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Author: Andrew Oberg
The question of the self, of what the self is (or even if there is a self), has been one that has grown alongside humanity – has haunted humanity – throughout our history. Blurred: Selves Made & Selves Making guides the reader down these dark corridors, shining light on the specters of theories past and unveiling a new self-view to hover afresh, beckoning to roadways beyond.

In this remarkably interdisciplinary study, philosophy of mind joins with contemporary neuroscience and cutting-edge psychology to lay bare the how of identity formation, judgment, and behavior generation. Drawing on thinkers from both the Continental and Analytic traditions, consciousness is explored and a uniquely realist self concept presented that, if adopted, offers a life lived otherwise.
Buddhist Philosophy of Consciousness brings Buddhist voices to the study of consciousness. This book explores a variety of different Buddhist approaches to consciousness that developed out of the Buddhist theory of non-self. Topics taken up in these investigations include: how we are able to cognize our own cognitions; whether all conscious states involve conceptualization; whether distinct forms of cognition can operate simultaneously in a single mental stream; whether non-existent entities can serve as intentional objects; and does consciousness have an intrinsic nature, or can it only be characterized functionally? These questions have all featured in recent debates in consciousness studies. The answers that Buddhist philosophers developed to such questions are worth examining just because they may represent novel approaches to questions about consciousness.
Concept and Judgment in Brentano's Logic Lectures is concerned with a crucial aspect of Brentano's philosophy as it was developed in his logic lectures from c. 1870 to c. 1885. The first part of the volume is an analysis of his theory of concept and judgment. The second part consists of materials, including a German edition and English translation of notes that a student took from a lecture course that Brentano gave. A short book by this student on Brentano is also translated in the materials.

The access to Brentano's philosophy is enhanced by this volume not only with regard to his logic as a theory of deductive inference, but also to his descriptive psychology, metaphysics, and philosophy of language.
Author: Jacob Boas
In Cultural Criticism in the Netherlands, 1933-40, Jacob Boas offers a broad selection of the newspaper columns of legendary Dutch cultural critic Menno ter Braak. Ter Braak’s columns are noteworthy not only for their distinctive treatment of disparate cultural components ranging from literature to the social sciences, but also for the light they throw on the extent to which politics intruded on the cultural sphere in the years prior to the outbreak of war.
Ter Braak set a standard for literary criticism of surpassing quality. Moreover, a staunch advocate of democracy, the critic joined the battle against fascism, urging fellow intellectuals to rise to the occasion. The ‘conscience of Dutch letters’ killed himself on the eve of the German occupation, May 1940.
What is video game culture and video games as culture? Culture at Play avoids easy answers and deceitful single definitions. Instead, the collected essays included here navigate the messy and exciting waters of video games, of culture, and of the meeting of video games and culture, and do so from four perspectives: Players: Types and Identities; The Human/The Machine: Agents, Ethics, and Affect; Compassion, Recognition, and the Interpersonal; and Learning through Play. As a form of play, video games can greatly affect our lives. As digital objects, they participate in our digital lives. As both, they have a noticeable impact on our relationships with others, with society, and with ourselves, and this is the scope of this book.
Vous ne lisez pas les notes en bas de page ? Vous avez tort. Rien de plus passionnant qu’une note infrapaginale, ou marginale, ou finale car il est vrai que nos dispositifs d’annotation sont divers. Souvent c’est la note qui contient l’essentiel. C’est alors par elle qu’il faut commencer. Nous distinguons entre le texte et le paratexte mais le paratexte est aussi une autre sorte de texte. Une « frange d’incertitude » (Genette) nous permet de passer d’un régime à l’autre. Les choses deviennent intéressantes à ce moment. Imaginez la note à la place du texte, le texte à la place de la note. Votre univers bascule, vous entrez dans un monde parallèle. La littérature est le lieu où la frontière entre le texte et les notes devient indécidable. Le présent volume passe en revue les pratiques d’annotation en contexte européen et ailleurs. Il offre au lecteur une riche série « d’études de cas » où le geste de l’annotateur est observé in actu. Parmi les auteurs étudiés : Balzac, Chateaubriand, Eliot, Mallarmé, Nabokov, Proust, Rimbaud, Oliver Rolin, et bien d’autres.

You don’t read footnotes? You are mistaken. There’s nothing more passionate than a footnote, a sidenote, or an endnote. The essential part of the message is the footnote. Narratologists distinguish between texte and paratexte, but the paratexte is just a different kind of texte. A frange d’incertitude (Genette) allows one to switch from one system to another. Imagine the note in the position of the text and the text in the position of the note. Your universe switches: you enter into a parallel world. Literature is the place where the border between the text and the notes becomes undecidable. The current volume reviews annotation practices in and outside of the European context. It offers a substantial series of “case studies” to the reader, where the actions of the annotateur are observed in actu. Among the studied authors: Balzac, Chateaubriand, Eliot, Mallarmé, Nabokov, Proust, Rimbaud, Oliver Rolin, and many others.

Avec des contributions de / With contributions from Anikó Ádám, Emmanuel Bouju, Maria de Jesus Cabral, Riccardo Campi, Ana Paula Coutinho, Andrea Del Lungo, Karen Haddad, Vincent Jouve, Fatima Outereirinhou, Claude Perez, Marika Piva, Nathalie Roelens, Franc Schuerewegen.