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Author: Fred Orton
Fred Orton’s teaching and writing has always combined theoretical and formal – which to say structural - analysis with historical research and reflection. This collection of essays – rewritten studies of Paul Cézanne, Jasper Johns, the American cultural critic Harold Rosenberg and a new essay on Marx and Engels’ notion of ideology – brings together some of his most decisive contributions to thinking about fine art practice and rethinking the theory and methods of the social history of art. More than an anthology, it offers a vivid demonstration of how theory can work to generate new interpretations and unsettle old ones.
Politics, Economy and Society South of the Sahara in 2020
The Africa Yearbook covers major domestic political developments, the foreign policy and socio-economic trends in sub-Sahara Africa – all related to developments in one calendar year. The Yearbook contains articles on all sub-Saharan states, each of the four sub-regions (West, Central, Eastern, Southern Africa) focusing on major cross-border developments and sub-regional organizations as well as one article on continental developments and one on African-European relations. While the articles have thorough academic quality, the Yearbook is mainly oriented to the requirements of a large range of target groups: students, politicians, diplomats, administrators, journalists, teachers, practitioners in the field of development aid as well as business people.
The History, Theology, and Liturgy of the Eucharist in the Anglican Church of Australia
Author: Brian Douglas
In The Anglican Eucharist in Australia, Brian Douglas explores the History, Theology, and Liturgy of the Eucharist in the Anglican Church of Australia. The story begins with the first white settlement in 1788 and continues to the present day. The three eucharistic liturgies used in the ACA, and the debates that led to them, are examined in depth: The Book of Common Prayer (1662); An Australian Prayer Book (1978); and A Prayer Book for Australia (1995). The deep sacramentality of the Aboriginal people is acknowledged and modern issues such as liturgical development, lay presidency and virtual Eucharists are also explored. The book concludes with some suggestions for the further development of eucharistic liturgies within the ACA.
Author: Joseph Fracchia
In a seemingly offhand, often overlooked comment, Karl Marx deemed ‘human corporeal organisation’ the ‘first fact of human history’. Following Marx’s corporeal turn and pursuing the radical implications of his corporeal insight, this book undertakes a reconstruction of the corporeal foundations of historical materialism. Part I exposes the corporeal roots of Marx’s materialist conception of history and historical-materialist Wissenschaft. Part II attempts a historical-materialist mapping of human corporeal organisation. Suggesting how to approach human histories up from their corporeal foundations, Part III elaborates historical-materialism as ‘corporeal semiotics’. Part IV, a case study of Marx’s critique of capitalist socio-economic and cultural forms, reveals the corporeal foundations of that critique and the corporeal depth of his vision of human freedom and dignity.
Controversies about History, Development and Revolution in Brazil is a critical exploration of the history of Brazilian economic thought in the light of the country’s own historical and political development. Editors Maria Malta, Jaime León, Carla Curty and Bruno Borja present an analytical interpretation of the facts, which reveals the power of debates constructing a genuinely Brazilian contribution to world economic thought on development, democracy, history, dependency, and revolution.
Resulting from 10 years of collective research, this book incorporates a new methodological proposal stemming from the strength and resilience of public research financed by the Brazilian people in quest of their own formative interpretation.

Contributors are: Bruno Borja, Carla Curty, Filipe Leite, Jaime León, Maria Malta, Larissa Mazolli, Alfredo Saad-Filho, and Wilson Vieira.
The Continuing Relevance of Latin American Critical Thought
Author: Claudio Katz
Translator: Stanley Malinowitz
This book received the Libertador Prize for Critical Thought (2018), demonstrating a renewal of interest in Dependency Theory. That conception initially included distinct forms of Marxism, liberalism, and developmentalism that should be differentiated, despite sharing the same name. The later retreat of that approach contrasts with the growing present-day relevance of its postulates; Latin America bears the effects of dependency even more acutely than in the past, making it imperative to understand the logic of its peripheral subordination. Dependency Theory in its original form is insufficient for explaining contemporary reality; it must be updated to interpret the current modalities of dependent capitalism. This book offers analytical clues to that reinvention.
“Vergangenheitsbewältigung” as a Historical Quest. Free Ebrei Volume 3
Editor: Vincenzo Pinto
Remembering the Holocaust in Germany, Austria, Italy and Israel: “Vergangenheitsbewältigung” as a Historical Quest offers an account on post-war coming-to-terms with the Holocaust tragedy in some European countries, such as Germany, Austria, and Italy. The subject has attracted more attention in recent years, since the long transition to liberal democracy seems to have put an end to the main theme of the memory of the Second World War.

The main point of the volume is the making of a new generational memory after the “end of history”. What is to be done after the making of a globalised world? What about the memorialisation of the last century?
Author: David R. Cole
Human civilisation stands at an unimaginable precipice. The human past, leading up to today, has seen society develop under the conditions of the Holocene since 10000 BC. However – we are now in the Anthropocene, what Deleuze/Guattari term as the future rupturing the present. This book analyses the Anthropocene given four dimensions: ‘tool-enhancement’; ‘carbon trail’; ‘the phallocene’; and ‘atomic-time’. A mode of education and social change lies parallel to this mapping that tackles degrowth, changing consciousness, a Green Utopia, and building a critical-immanent model to realign current practices in the light of globalisation. This is the first book to put the philosophy of Deleuze/Guattari to work for the future, and our collective existence as a differentiated educational practice in the Anthropocene.
Conversations with Jewish Refugees from Germany and Austria
In Émigré Voices Lewkowicz and Grenville present twelve oral history interviews with men and women who came to Britain as Jewish refugees from Germany and Austria in the late 1930s. Many of the interviewees rose to great prominence in their chosen career, such as the author and illustrator Judith Kerr, the actor Andrew Sachs, the photographer and cameraman Wolf Suschitzky, the violinist Norbert Brainin, and the publisher Elly Miller. The narratives of the interviewees tell of their common struggles as child or young adult refugees who had to forge new lives in a foreign country and they illuminate how each interviewee dealt with the challenges of forced emigration and the Holocaust. The voices of the twelve interviewees provide the reader with a unique and original source, which gives direct access to the lived multifaceted experience of the interviewees and their contributions to British culture.