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Usable Pasts addresses projects dating to two periods in the United States that saw increased financial support from the state for socially engaged culture. By analysing artworks dating to the 1990s by Suzanne Lacy, Rick Lowe and Martha Rosler in relation to experimental theatre, modern dance, and photography produced within the leftist Cultural Front of the 1930s, this book unpicks the mythic and material afterlives of the New Deal in American cultural politics in order to write a new history of social practice art in the United States. From teenage mothers organising exhibitions that challenged welfare reform, to communist dance troupes choreographing their struggles as domestic workers, Usable Pasts addresses the aesthetics and politics of these attempts to transform society through art in relation to questions of state formation.
Author: Rana Abu-Mounes
On 9 July 1860 CE, an outbreak of violence in the inner-city Christian quarter of Damascus created shock waves locally and internationally. This book provides a step-by-step presentation and reproduction of the facts to assess the true role of all the players and shapers of events. It critically examines the internal and external politico-socio-economic factors involved and argues that economic interests rather than religious fanaticism were the main causes for the riot of 1860. Furthermore, it argues that the riot was not a sudden eruption but rather a planned and organised affair.
The African cities of Bata and Al-Hoceima were created during the Spanish colonial rule of Equatorial Guinea and Morocco. This book constructs their local history to analyse how Spanish colonialism worked, what its legacies were and the imprints it left on their national histories. The work explains the revision of collective memories of the past in the present as a form of decolonisation that seeks to build different foundations for the future in a transnational and glocal framework. The result is an exciting puzzle of individual and collective memories in which Africans contest their colonial cultural heritage and shape their identities at a global level.
The Continuing Relevance of Latin American Critical Thought
Author: Claudio Katz
Translator: Stanley Malinowitz
This book received the Libertador Prize for Critical Thought (2018), demonstrating a renewal of interest in Dependency Theory. That conception initially included distinct forms of Marxism, liberalism, and developmentalism that should be differentiated, despite sharing the same name. The later retreat of that approach contrasts with the growing present-day relevance of its postulates; Latin America bears the effects of dependency even more acutely than in the past, making it imperative to understand the logic of its peripheral subordination. Dependency Theory in its original form is insufficient for explaining contemporary reality; it must be updated to interpret the current modalities of dependent capitalism. This book offers analytical clues to that reinvention.
Author: Fred Orton
Fred Orton’s teaching and writing has always combined theoretical and formal – which to say structural - analysis with historical research and reflection. This collection of essays – rewritten studies of Paul Cézanne, Jasper Johns, the American cultural critic Harold Rosenberg and a new essay on Marx and Engels’ notion of ideology – brings together some of his most decisive contributions to thinking about fine art practice and rethinking the theory and methods of the social history of art. More than an anthology, it offers a vivid demonstration of how theory can work to generate new interpretations and unsettle old ones.
Author: Joseph Fracchia
In a seemingly offhand, often overlooked comment, Karl Marx deemed ‘human corporeal organisation’ the ‘first fact of human history’. Following Marx’s corporeal turn and pursuing the radical implications of his corporeal insight, this book undertakes a reconstruction of the corporeal foundations of historical materialism. Part I exposes the corporeal roots of Marx’s materialist conception of history and historical-materialist Wissenschaft. Part II attempts a historical-materialist mapping of human corporeal organisation. Suggesting how to approach human histories up from their corporeal foundations, Part III elaborates historical-materialism as ‘corporeal semiotics’. Part IV, a case study of Marx’s critique of capitalist socio-economic and cultural forms, reveals the corporeal foundations of that critique and the corporeal depth of his vision of human freedom and dignity.
Controversies about History, Development and Revolution in Brazil is a critical exploration of the history of Brazilian economic thought in the light of the country’s own historical and political development. Editors Maria Malta, Jaime León, Carla Curty and Bruno Borja present an analytical interpretation of the facts, which reveals the power of debates constructing a genuinely Brazilian contribution to world economic thought on development, democracy, history, dependency, and revolution.
Resulting from 10 years of collective research, this book incorporates a new methodological proposal stemming from the strength and resilience of public research financed by the Brazilian people in quest of their own formative interpretation.

Contributors are: Bruno Borja, Carla Curty, Filipe Leite, Jaime León, Maria Malta, Larissa Mazolli, Alfredo Saad-Filho, and Wilson Vieira.
Conversations with Jewish Refugees from Germany and Austria
In Émigré Voices Lewkowicz and Grenville present twelve oral history interviews with men and women who came to Britain as Jewish refugees from Germany and Austria in the late 1930s. Many of the interviewees rose to great prominence in their chosen career, such as the author and illustrator Judith Kerr, the actor Andrew Sachs, the photographer and cameraman Wolf Suschitzky, the violinist Norbert Brainin, and the publisher Elly Miller. The narratives of the interviewees tell of their common struggles as child or young adult refugees who had to forge new lives in a foreign country and they illuminate how each interviewee dealt with the challenges of forced emigration and the Holocaust. The voices of the twelve interviewees provide the reader with a unique and original source, which gives direct access to the lived multifaceted experience of the interviewees and their contributions to British culture.
“Vergangenheitsbewältigung” as a Historical Quest. Free Ebrei Volume 3
Editor: Vincenzo Pinto
Remembering the Holocaust in Germany, Austria, Italy and Israel: “Vergangenheitsbewältigung” as a Historical Quest offers an account on post-war coming-to-terms with the Holocaust tragedy in some European countries, such as Germany, Austria, and Italy. The subject has attracted more attention in recent years, since the long transition to liberal democracy seems to have put an end to the main theme of the memory of the Second World War.

The main point of the volume is the making of a new generational memory after the “end of history”. What is to be done after the making of a globalised world? What about the memorialisation of the last century?
Author: David R. Cole
Human civilisation stands at an unimaginable precipice. The human past, leading up to today, has seen society develop under the conditions of the Holocene since 10000 BC. However – we are now in the Anthropocene, what Deleuze/Guattari term as the future rupturing the present. This book analyses the Anthropocene given four dimensions: ‘tool-enhancement’; ‘carbon trail’; ‘the phallocene’; and ‘atomic-time’. A mode of education and social change lies parallel to this mapping that tackles degrowth, changing consciousness, a Green Utopia, and building a critical-immanent model to realign current practices in the light of globalisation. This is the first book to put the philosophy of Deleuze/Guattari to work for the future, and our collective existence as a differentiated educational practice in the Anthropocene.