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Illuminating Diversity in Rural Communities in the United States
Illuminating issues of diversity at the intersection of rural education and multilingual learners (ML) in the United States, this edited volume brings forth new research that captures the importance of place and rurality in the work of educators who serve multilingual learners and their families. The six chapters in this book demonstrate that education for teachers, leaders and staff, professional development programs, and government-funded projects aimed to improve rural education need to begin with three interrelated, multifaceted principles. The first principle is the need to center place and rurality as essential for all the educators, students, and families within a particular instructional context. Second, educators must humanize multilingual students, their families, and their cultures in ways that go beyond merely acknowledging their presence but that goes further–to deeply seeing and understanding the lives and (hi)stories of students and families in schools and communities. Finally, the third principle involves identifying multilingual resources for ML students and their families. Given the persistent inequities in access to resources and opportunities that rural ML students and families face, this last principle requires careful planning, networking, and advocating in ways that can truly effectuate change.

Contributors are: Jioanna Carjuzaa, Maria R. Coady, Paula Golombek, Shuzhan Li, Kristin Kline Liu, Nidza V. Marichal, Charity Funfe Tatah Mentan, Kym O’Donnell, Stephanie Oudghiri, Darrell Peterson, Sonja Phillips, Jenelle Reeves and Yi-Chen Wu.
Life-World Studies of Professionals in Education and Research
Exploring Practical Knowledge explores professional studies from the perspective of practical knowledge and related hermeneutic approaches in a broader sense, including studies of practical wisdom, tacit knowledge, and normativity from a life-world perspective. These contributions focus on both specific practices and more general questions concerning theories of practice and the studies of it.

This volume comes as the result of a cooperation of three centres for the study of professions in the Netherlands, Sweden, and Norway: The two Centres for Practical Knowledge, one in Bodø, Norway and the other in Södertörn, Sweden, as well as the Research Group Value-Oriented Professionalisation at the University of Applied Sciences in Utrecht, the Netherlands. It offers empirical studies and the underlying theories, approaches and methods of exploring practical knowledge, in addition to the limits in the articulation of these aspects of professional action. Each chapter presents central perspectives and possibilities represented by the common interest in interdisciplinary and Humanistic research on professions, in contrast to the objectivist paradigm that otherwise dominates professional studies. The professions explored also make the book broadly accessible to scholars as well practitioners; to those studying practices within these professions and for vocational studies in education, social work, health care, police work, journalism, etc.
Radical Collegiality and Relational Pedagogies of Care in Education
Author:
How can we manifest more relational care in education by harnessing joy in the school setting? Finding Joy suggests it is found in care-based pedagogies, radical collegiality and relational reading practices. Guided by philosophical conversations with educational thinkers whose works have informed the author’s own praxis over a twenty-year career in public education, at the end of each chapter the reader is given provocations for reflection through a series of questions.
The book charts the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the impact that it has had on the lives of young people and their communities, education systems, the teaching profession, and the responses by governments, NGOs, and donor organisations in Pakistan. Drawing on theories of postcolonialism, feminism, and neoliberal globalisation, the authors explore the development of Pakistan as a postcolonial nation-state, and examine the legacies of colonialism in education systems and policies, teacher education and development. The Pakistani authors bring extensive knowledge and experience to this case study of the ‘broken promise’ of education for sustainable development. This mix of theoretical insight and practical experience promises to produce significant policy and development impact in post-COVID-19 Pakistan, South Asia more broadly, and in other postcolonial development contexts around the world as it develops a critique of the UN SDGs as a global and more local framework for development.
Volume Editors: and
Teaching, born of the period of the ancient sages, developed as the moral art of living that introduced humanity to teaching as a moral pursuit, to the formation of value, to a moral and religious mode of being, and to a set of moral principles that have survived into the modern day. The idea that the ‘future of teaching’ represents a technological disruption of moral traditions of teaching and what teaching might become has become a serious concern for the current generation of philosophers in both China and the West.
Volume Editors: and
In an attempt to foster effective learning for the students, educators and researchers have been examining the complex relations between psychological, biological, sociological, and cultural aspects of the educative process. The common goal is to promote deep learning and maximize the potential of next-generation students in constructing knowledge, understanding, supporting, and advancing skills in their chosen fields. In the past decades, scientists and educational researchers are developing a new understanding of how the brain works and gaining knowledge of brain research that can transform how they teach in class. Recent discoveries in non-invasive brain imaging and cognitive neuroscience are providing fresh perspectives and mechanisms of learning. The chapters in this book will portray theoretical frameworks, thought-provoking ideas, and promising efforts in framing new science of learning.
Author:

Abstract

The broad constructs of learner control and independent/self-directed learning has been well researched in the learning sciences. This research has consistently revealed that under certain circumstances there can be negative consequences when learners are provided with high degrees of learner control. The role for feedback is linked to independent learning and is one of the most powerful influences on learner success. Specifically, as learner assessment is the de facto curriculum, feedback on progress is an essential driver. However, feedback is not discrete practice. Research in the learning sciences reveals that effective feedback involves a number of complex issues, including (a) the effective ‘type’ of feedback (immediate, delayed, knowledge of correct/incorrect response, etc.), (b) the kind of learning outcome (cognitive, intellectual, verbal or attitudinal) and (c) purposes (motivation, information, or contingent). Hence, feedback is an integral part of an instructional dialogue between instructors and learners and the effectiveness changes under different circumstances. The purpose of this chapter is to present a set of heuristics to guide effective strategies for course design based on what we know from the learning sciences on independent learning and feedback.

In: New Science of Learning

Abstract

In this chapter, we discuss the relationship between advances in neuroscience and learning in six sections. We first discuss the structural characteristics of the brain and the main contributions of neuroscience advances such as neural recycling, neuroplasticity, inhibition, Bayesian brain and brain imaging. We then analyse the types of learning and the stages of skill acquisition and their pedagogical implications.

We determine the neuromediators and neurophysiological mechanisms involved in learning processes. They ensure the control, regulation and orientation of the learner’s behaviour. Through these mechanisms, we present pedagogical recommendations to optimise learning.

We will show, on the one hand, the three main functions that actively participate in the acquisition process (attention, comprehension and memory), on the other hand, the factors that vary the effectiveness of learning.

This chapter ends with a discussion of the issues and limitations of neuroeducation.

In: New Science of Learning

Abstract

Educators and research centers worldwide are working to better understand about human learning afforded by the confluence of non-invasive brain imaging and cognitive neuroscience to translate research into educational practices and policies. In the process of relentless pursuit, many developments and discoveries on human learning have been reported in the literature. Leveraging on the recent findings in neuroscience, educational researchers are collaborating with scientists to find ways to provide intervention strategies for the optimum learning experience. With contributions from leading researchers in the field, this book features the most recent and advanced research in this area. This chapter synthesizes studies reported in this volume on mind, brain, and education that will shape the future of learning.

In: New Science of Learning

Abstract

Over the past decade, wisdom research has encountered a radical shift in discourse with respect to neurobiology. This has a profound impact on how wisdom is taught in schools. Educating for wisdom requires teaching students to enrich their values, produce a meaningful life, fulfilling a desired life, and understanding one’s relationship with themselves and others in the world. In this book chapter, we disseminate how educational neuroscience can provide a holistic understanding of wisdom in curriculum. We explore a neurocognitive model with interdependent wisdom components including salience detection, impulse control, reward evaluation, information integration, conflict detection, error evaluation, and self-referential processing, and its relationship to brain regions. Furthermore, these wisdom components entail interpersonal and intrapersonal processes that are foundational to student development. For a more cohesive working definition of wisdom in neuroscience, we propose an integrative model in which brain regions holistically interact in a hierarchical and scale-invariant manner. Small-world networks can enhance the capacity to show the neurodynamics of wisdom in the brain. Finally, we discuss wisdom-based curriculum with the goal to establish practices for cultivating wisdom in educational settings to provide longevity toward student’s well-being beyond the environment of a classroom. This requires the development of schools or curricula in public schools and informal settings that provide instruction for teaching wisdom across ages.

In: New Science of Learning