Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 4,177 items for :

  • Comparative Studies & World Literature x
  • Criticism & Theory x
  • Primary Language: English x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Representing the Shadows of the City of Light
Volume Editors: and
This volume invites you to wander in the shadows of the city of light and discover another, often invisible and silent, Paris. Its chapters explore Parisian margins, including various populations, spaces and practices, as represented in French literature and cinema since 1800. You will get a pick at the Parisians’ criminal activities and nocturnal lives in the 19th-century. You will witness how industrialization and capitalism between the 1850s and the 1970s reshaped the socioeconomic map of Paris by creating or reinforcing spaces of social inequity. You will also meet marginalized groups that are often ignored or neglected in today’s Paris—and the French society—, including the LGBTQ+, black and immigrant communities.
Early 20th-century literary critics Joseph Collins, Hermann Hesse, and Percy Lubbock concluded that the pages of a book present a succession of moments that the reader visualizes and reinterprets. They feared that few would actually commit themselves to memory, and that most were likely to soon disappear. As you turn these pages, you will (re)discover the value of the literary canon through the Self. My objective is to examine how the Self is formed, lost, and regained through creative strategies that confront and define its shapes and distortions on nearly every page of a canonical work. You can consider Confronting / Defining the Self: Formation and Dissolution of the ‘I’ from La Fayette to Grass as offering an apology for the study of literature and the humanities in an era when technology and commerce dominate our consciousness, drive our daily expectations, and shape our career goals.
Re-appropriating the Victorian and Medieval Pasts
Volume Editors: and
Bringing together neo-Victorian and medievalism scholars in dialogue with each other for the first time, this collection of essays foregrounds issues common to both fields. The Victorians reimagined the medieval era and post-Victorian medievalism repurposes received nineteenth century tropes, as do neo-Victorian texts. For example, aesthetic movements such as Arts and Crafts, which looked for inspiration in the medieval era, are echoed by steampunk in its return to Victorian dress and technology. Issues of gender identity, sexuality, imperialism and nostalgia arise in both neo-Victorianism and medievalism, and analysis of such texts is enriched and expanded by the interconnections between the two fields represented in this groundbreaking collection.
Author:

Abstract

This article maps the nodes of the far-right ecosystem as it intersects with the touchstones of the medieval past—both real and imagined. In particular, I examine how the visual and textual rhetoric of the medieval past (and its various reincarnations) is re-deployed in contemporary white terrorism, especially from Charlottesville, Virginia in 2017 and Christchurch, New Zealand in 2019.

In: Neo-Victorianism and Medievalism

Abstract

William Morris’s News from Nowhere (1890) was a retrofuturist fantasy in which a Utopian England created after a revolution looks suspiciously like an idealized vision of an agrarian Medieval past. Morris looked back to the Medieval period to imagine how Victorian society might be reformed. Steampunk similarly looks back to the Victorian Era to create a retrofuturist vision of an alternative history. Both Morris and steampunk use “fake” histories to critique present values. These strategies echo postmodern critiques of history. The recent prevalence of “fake news” raises troubling questions about such alternative histories as another way in which contemporary digital media can be used to distort reality. Whilst steampunk looks to the Victorian Era as a point of stability in the face of social upheaval caused by new digital media, the recourse to fake history also contributes to the subversion of references to a shared reality.

In: Neo-Victorianism and Medievalism
In: Neo-Victorianism and Medievalism

Abstract

This introduction situates the fields of neo-Victorianism and medievalism in the broader category of the neo-historical, and then argues that these two fields are particularly suited to be brought into conversation with one another. It addresses issues of presentism, and attitudes of exoticism, familiarity, commodification, and nostalgia—all of which have the potential to shape neo-Victorian and medievalism’s recourses to the past. It then introduces key areas of discussion for the collection as a whole (race and place, gender and sexuality, steampunk and retrofuturism) and provides an overview of the essays that follow.

In: Neo-Victorianism and Medievalism
Author:

Abstract

Emma Donoghue’s novel The Wonder (2016) provides a modern day, fictional entry into Ireland’s traumatic history, through the narrative of Anna O’Donnell, an eleven-year-old “fasting girl” living in post-Famine Ireland. The lingering detail on Anna’s body presents a reflection on the Famine, but the novel also evaluates contemporary notions of anorexia as a consequence of Anna’s rejection of food. The management of Anna’s sexually abused body through medical observation (Foucault’s clinical gaze) also provides a reflection on her identity as a pre-pubescent girl heading toward sexual maturity, whilst the logic of this surveillance is also mapped onto the landscape and body politic (through the tourist gaze). The novel therefore identifies broader themes and concerns specific to Ireland, nationhood and Catholicism, as well as how sexual ethics and body image have been imposed on women both in the nineteenth century and the present day.

In: Neo-Victorianism and Medievalism

Abstract

This chapter explores how John Logan’s Gothic television series Penny Dreadful (2014–2016) deploys various medieval motifs to reimagine the nineteenth-century fin-de-siècle on screen. Adapting Andrew B. R. Elliott’s analysis of the repurposing of the Middle Ages in mass media, I trace the ideological implications of the amalgamation of the neo-Victorian and neomedieval in a postmodern product for mass consumption. On the basis of the show’s encoded medievalism, introduced through tropes of witchcraft and spiritualism, monster-avengers, and allusions to female mysticism, I argue that both “the medieval” and “the Victorian” as specific historical referents mutate into amorphous floating signifiers of generalized attitudes toward the past as barbaric and backward. Penny Dreadful draws not only on the Middle Ages but also on nineteenth-century remediations of the earlier period, thus accentuating the show’s Gothic narrative and constructing the Victorian fin-de-siècle as a new “Dark Age”, particularly inimical to women.

In: Neo-Victorianism and Medievalism
Author:

Abstract

After situating Charlotte M. Yonge’s The Heir of Redclyffe (1853), Rodman Philbrick’s Freak the Mighty (1993), and the latter’s film adaptation, The Mighty (1998) in the context of young people’s literature and culture, this essay traces the knight as figure of ideal masculinity in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, arguing that this figure blurs the boundaries of medievalism and neo-Victorianism. These texts depict characters’ recourse to medievalism to argue for the figure of the knight as a viable model of masculinity for young men as they seek to become constructive participants in society. The essay concludes by reflecting on the implications of this knightly model for spiritual or secular salvation and for the legacy of Victorian medievalism in young people’s literature.

In: Neo-Victorianism and Medievalism