Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 2,071 items for :

  • Literature and Cultural Studies x
  • Primary Language: English x
  • Search level: Chapters/Articles x
Clear All
In: Castaway Bodies in the Eighteenth–Century English Robinsonade
In: Castaway Bodies in the Eighteenth–Century English Robinsonade
In: Castaway Bodies in the Eighteenth–Century English Robinsonade
In: Castaway Bodies in the Eighteenth–Century English Robinsonade
In: Castaway Bodies in the Eighteenth–Century English Robinsonade

Abstract

This paper examines how Dada reinterpreted the figures of androids, cyborgs, Dandies, robots and automatons first conceived of within the Decadent imagination of the fin-de-siècle. First and foremost, however, it looks at how these literary and artistic figures became increasingly provocative within avant-garde production, especially from the point of view of gender. Works that transgressed conventional boundaries of gender and that interrogated power relations took on a subversive cast within Dada, forming as it were a prelude to the postmodern and post-humanist variations on these themes that have come to dominate recent and current discourse. The essay begins with Western examples before offering an overview of the Hungarian avant-garde as a case study. The Hungarian avant-garde, like other modernist experiments in the region, did not commit itself to Dada exclusively. Rather, it incorporated certain techniques drawn from Dada into its artistic practice, often blending Dada with other artistic movements, for example Constructivism. Accordingly, the puppets, robots and machines of Hungarian Dada differ from the Dada humanoids of Western art history.

In: Cannibalizing the Canon
Author:

Abstract

This article seeks to trace the complicated itinerary of Dadaist influence over the Romanian avant-garde against the backdrop of the centre-periphery dichotomy. To this end, I will argue that, albeit that one of the leaders of the international Dada movement was Tristan Tzara, a Jewish Romanian émigré, the impact of the movement on the Romanian avant-garde is not exclusively due to the unmediated contact through one of its co-founders, but also to the international connections developed throughout the East-Central European avant-garde network. A central element illustrating this two-pronged connection is to be found in the Dadaist techniques assimilated by Romanian Avant-gardists during the 1920s. Such artistic devices permeated Romanian culture largely through a network built on Constructivist affinities shared with other regional avant-gardes (such as the Hungarian, Czech, and Polish groups) than through direct association with leading Dada artists. In demonstrating this lateral assimilation of the Dada movement, I will set out to identify traces of inter-peripheral influence manifest through Romanian Dadaist collages and manifestos found in Constructivist magazines such as Contimporanul or 75 HP .

In: Cannibalizing the Canon
Author:

Abstract

The present article has two primary aims: first, to reintegrate Céline Arnauld into our memory of the avant-gardes by reconstructing the local histories in which she participated and which were shaped by her work and her activities. The second priority is to analyze the existing histories of the avant-gardes in order to show the limits of their national frameworks as well as the shortcomings of the concepts of ‘transnationalism’ and ‘internationalism’ used in avant-garde scholarship during the last few decades. By doing so, I argue for a new, more integrative concept of transnational avant-garde movements in the first half of the twentieth-century.

In: Cannibalizing the Canon
Author:

Abstract

By tracing the life and work of the Hungarian writer, painter, editor and art critic Emil Szittya through its shifting geographic, linguistic and artistic contexts, this paper seeks to portray the Dadaist outlook par excellence, as described by Tristan Tzara. Moreover, the paper connects this outlook to Szittya’s strategy of artistic self-realisation based on transgression: on crossing borders as much as breaking professional codes and norms. The first part of the paper lays out Szittya’s praxis as such that was prone to be channelled into the international avant-garde movement of the time. It shows how he cultivates a vagrant persona set out to devour all the streets and all the lives, and distil the acquired experiences on the road into his art. The second part narrows the focus to Szittya’s writings that can be directly tied to the Zurich phase of the Dada movement.

In: Cannibalizing the Canon