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Urbanisation and (Neo-)Colonialism in Transatlantic Context
Author:
What do struggles over pipelines in Canada, housing estates in France, and shantytowns in Martinique have in common? In Urban Revolutions, Stefan Kipfer shows how these struggles force us to understand the (neo-)colonial aspects of capitalist urbanization in a comparatively and historically nuanced fashion. In so doing, he demonstrates that urban research can offer a rich, if uneven, terrain upon which to develop the relationship between Marxist and anti-colonial intellectual traditions. After a detailed dialogue between Henri Lefebvre and Frantz Fanon, Kipfer engages creole literature in the French Antilles, Indigenous radicalism in North America and political anti-racism in mainland France.
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Why are some people free to move around the world while others are constrained for crossing borders? This book challenges this crucial injustice that creates inequalities in the face of global issues such as climate change, wars, diseases and other local risk factors. The main theme of this collective work is to consider the representation of human displacement as a moral barrier between expatriates and migrants, with the former being seen as 'unproblematic' and 'desirable' while the latter is portrayed as 'problematic' and 'undesirable'. Surveys show that this binary categorization subsists on at least four continents, stigmatizing different categories of people.

Contributors are: Julia Büchele, Clio Chaveneau, Milos Debnar, Karine Duplan, Abdoulaye Gueye, Omar Lizarraga, and Chie Sakai.
This book discusses five cases of hatred politics on the margins of global capital: Turkey under Erdogan (assumed office in 2003), Hungary under Orbán (assumed office in 2010), India under Modi (assumed office in 2014); the Philippines under Duterte (assumed office in 2016) and Brazil under Bolsonaro (assumed office in 2019). How did they come to power? What strategies of legitimation do they employ? What resistances do they face? Country case studies lay the foundation for a systematic comparison that illuminates the key dynamics of this novel political form. Analyses of their responses to the Covid-19 pandemic further shed light on their methods in a time of crisis and a chapter that considers the Trump presidency indicates how we can understand these leaderships given their pronounced counterpart in the Global North – and vice-versa. This is not a mere collection of texts commissioned from specialists, but the result of a two-year-long collective endeavor: an international taskforce to respond to a global phenomenon.

Contributors are: Fabio Luis Barbosa dos Santos, Daniel Feldmann, Ágnes Gagyi, Daniel Geary, Tamás Gerőcs, Sefika Kumral, Cecilia Lero, Devika Misra, Ilhan Can Ozen and Aparna Sundar.