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This book examines the interrelationships between trauma, time, and narrative in the novel “The Journey” (1962) by the scholar, novelist, poet, and Holocaust survivor H. G. Adler. Drawing on Paul Ricœur’s philosophy of time and studies of time in literature, Julia Menzel analyzes how Adler’s novel depicts the experience of time as a dimension of Holocaust victims’ trauma. She explores the aesthetic temporality of “The Journey” and presents a new interpretation of the literary text, which she conceives of as a modern “Zeit-Roman” (time novel).

Die Studie untersucht die Wechselbeziehungen zwischen Trauma, Zeit und Erzählung in dem Roman „Eine Reise“ (1962) des Wissenschaftlers, Schriftstellers, Dichters und Holocaust-Überlebenden H. G. Adler. Unter Bezugnahme auf Paul Ricœurs Zeitphilosophie und die literaturwissenschaftliche Zeitforschung analysiert Julia Menzel, wie Adlers Roman traumatische Zeiterfahrungen der Opfer des Holocaust zur Darstellung bringt. Sie erkundet die ästhetische Eigenzeit von „Eine Reise“ und eröffnet eine neue Lesart des literarischen Texts, den sie als modernen Zeit-Roman begreift.
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This monograph spotlights women writers’ contributions to the philosophy of German Romanticism. Dorothea Mendelssohn Veit Schlegel, Rahel Levin Varnhagen, Karoline von Günderrode, and Bettina Brentano von Arnim suggested a new vision for an emancipated community of women that develops through philosophical discourse of Progressive Universal Poetry. Their personal, fictionalized, and literary letters reinvent and retheorize the Romantic notions of sociability, symphilosophy, and sympoetry, as theorized by men, and retheorize the concepts of love. They provided a model for shaping intellectual and cultural life in the modern world while challenging rigid dichotomies of classs, gender, and ethnicity.
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Against the backdrop of an insurgent far right and numerous deadly neo-Nazi attacks, various cultural practitioners have written far-right violence into Germany’s collective memory and imagined more inclusive futures in its wake. This volume explores contemporary examples from literature, music, theatre, film, television and art that respond to this situation. They demonstrate that, alongside the ways in which art expands the public sphere in terms of what is said and who is heard, aesthetic questions of how artistic works are presented are a crucial part of how they open up new perspectives.
Early 20th-century literary critics Joseph Collins, Hermann Hesse, and Percy Lubbock concluded that the pages of a book present a succession of moments that the reader visualizes and reinterprets. They feared that few would actually commit themselves to memory, and that most were likely to soon disappear. As you turn these pages, you will (re)discover the value of the literary canon through the Self. My objective is to examine how the Self is formed, lost, and regained through creative strategies that confront and define its shapes and distortions on nearly every page of a canonical work. You can consider Confronting / Defining the Self: Formation and Dissolution of the ‘I’ from La Fayette to Grass as offering an apology for the study of literature and the humanities in an era when technology and commerce dominate our consciousness, drive our daily expectations, and shape our career goals.
The bestselling, contemporary Swiss author Christian Kracht is as widely celebrated as he is a source of controversy. This introduction to his work suggests locating his writings in discourses that range beyond the labels that have been traditionally assigned to them, namely “postmodernism,” camp,” and “Popliteratur.” Instead, this volume considers Kracht’s work through the lenses of “authorship,” “irony,” and “globalism.” This volume argues that there is no fixed or uniform author represented in Kracht’s corpus, explores the ironic strategies involved in Kracht’s various authorial representations, and engages the cultural exchange inherent in Kracht’s work.
Civic virtues were central to early modern Nürnberg’s visual culture. These essays in this volume explore Nürnberg as a location from which to study the intersection of art and power. The imperial city was awash in emblems, and they informed most aspects of everyday life. The intent of this collection is to focus new attention on the town hall emblems, while simultaneously expanding the purview of emblem studies, moving from strict iconological approaches to collaborations across methodologies and disciplines.
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How did German composers brand their music as Venetian? How did the Other fare in other languages, when Cabeza’s Relación of colonial Americas appeared in translations? How did Altdorf emblems travel to colonial America and Sweden? What does Virtue look like in a library collection? And what was Boccaccio’s Decameron doing in the Ethica section? From representations of Sophie Charlotte, the first queen in Prussia, to the Ottoman Turks, from German wedding music to Till Eulenspiegel, from the translation of Horatian Odes and encyclopedias of heraldry, these essays by leading scholars explore the transmission, translation, and organization of knowledge in early modern Germany, contributing sophisticated insights to the history of the early modern book and its contents.