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This book attends to the most essential, lucrative, and overlooked business activity of early modern Europe: the trade of paper. Despite the well-known fact that paper was crucial to the success of printing and record-keeping alike, paper remains one of the least studied areas of early modern history. Organised into three sections, ‘Hotspots and Trade Routes’, ‘Usual Dealings’, and ‘Recycling Economies’, the chapters in the collection shed light on the practices, materials, and networks of the paper trade. Altogether, the collection uncovers the actors involved in the networks of paper production, transportation, purchase, and reuse, between the thirteenth and nineteenth centuries and across the central and peripheral papermaking regions of Europe.
Author: Robert Forgács
Situating the close relationship between Latin and music within its historical context, this volume presents an overview of Latin and music in the educational system of the time – schools, choir schools and universities – and the development and pervasive influence of musical humanism. This influence is seen primarily in the writings of music theorists, the documents of dedication found in music publications and above all in the settings of classical and Neo-Latin texts as well as in some liturgical and extra-liturgical ones. Discussion of this repertoire forms the centre of the volume. The emphasis is on practical matters: the study of Latin and music, and the music’s composition, performance and reception.
Author: Ardeshir Atai
Since the 1979 Islamic Revolution, Iran has implemented Sharia-compliant banking and finance which makes it one of the few countries that has adopted Islamic banking. The post-war liberalization and privatization of the economy and subsequent deregulation had paved the ground for emergence of private banks and financial institutions which had been subject to strict government control and ownership of banks. Further reform of the banking sector included authorization for the establishment and operations of foreign-owned banks in Iran and ratification of international treaties for the reciprocal protection and promotion of capital investments. The most recent government reform plan concerning adoption of a comprehensive banking law aims to create a single regulator for the prudential regulation and supervision of banks and financial institutions. The implementation of the aforesaid banking reform will be instrumental for achieving a sound and safe banking system and restoring investor confidence in the Iranian banking and money markets.
The Eastern Samaria Shoulder, from Nahal Tirzah (Wadi Far'ah) to Ma’ale Ephraim Junction
Authors: Shay Bar and Adam Zertal
The book presents the results of a complete detailed survey of the eastern region of Samaria, mainly the Eastern Samaria Shoulder, from Nahal Tirzah (Wadi Far'ah) to Ma’ale Ephraim Junction within the territory of Israel/Palestine. It is Volume 6 of the Manasseh Hill Country Survey publications. This project, in progress since 1978, and covering 2500 sq. km, is a thorough, metre-by-metre mapping of the archaeological-historical area between the River Jordan and the Sharon Plain, and between Nahal 'Iron and the north-eastern point of the Dead Sea. This territory is one of the most important in the country from the Biblical and archaeological view; and the survey is a valuable tool for scholars of the Bible, archaeology, Near Eastern history and other aspects of the Holy Land.
Author: Changyu Liu
In The Ur III Administrative Texts from Puzrish-Dagan Kept in the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East Changyu Liu offers an edition of a collection of 689 cuneiform clay tablets kept in the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East (HMANE, formerly Harvard Semitic Museum), Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. These administrative documents date to the Third Dynasty of Ur (Ur III, ca. 2112–2004 BCE) of Mesopotamian history and are from Puzrish-Dagan (modern Drehem in southern Iraq).

The editions of the 689 Ur III texts, arranged by their catalogue numbers, are significant for further study of how the Puzrish-Dagan organization functioned. New evidence has been gleaned and new conclusions can be drawn from texts in this book.

The Harvard Semitic Studies series publishes volumes from the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East. Other series offered by Brill that publish volumes from the Museum include Studies in the Archaeology and History of the Levant and Harvard Semitic Monographs, https://hmane.harvard.edu/publications.
In The “God of Israel” in History and Tradition, Michael Stahl provides a foundational study of the formulaic title “god of Israel” ( ’elohe yisra’el) in the Hebrew Bible. Employing critical theory on social power and identity, and through close literary and historical analysis, Dr. Stahl shows how the epithet “god of Israel” evolved to serve different social and political agendas throughout the course of ancient Israel and Judah’s histories. Reaching beyond the field of Biblical Studies, Dr. Stahl’s treatment of the historical and ideological significances of the title “god of Israel” in the Hebrew Bible offers a fruitful case study into the larger issue of the ways in which religion may shape—and be shaped by—social and political structures.
Author: Fredrik Hagen
In Ostraca from the Temple of Millions of Years of Thutmose III, Fredrik Hagen publishes a range of texts from recent excavations at Thebes. Although fragmentary, it is one of the richest corpora that have come to light for a generation, in terms of both the number of ostraca and the different types of texts represented, and provides essential new data for anyone interested in ancient Egyptian temples, religion, priests, and social history.

The texts shed light on many aspects of life in an Egyptian temple, including the building of the temple, the daily operations of its cult, the organisation and size of the priesthood, types and quantities of offerings, as well as the broader cultural issues of literacy and the transmission of literature.
Baghdadi Jewish Networks in the Age of Nationalism traces the participation of Baghdadi Jews in Jewish transnational networks from the mid-nineteenth century until the mass exodus of Jews from Iraq between 1948 and 1951. Each chapter explores different components of how Jews in Iraq participated in global Jewish civil society through the modernization of communal leadership, Baghdadi satellite communities, transnational Jewish philanthropy and secular Jewish education. The final chapter presents three case studies that demonstrate the interconnectivity between different iterations of transnational Jewish networks. This work significantly expands our understanding of modern Iraqi Jewish society by going beyond its engagement with Arab/Iraqi nationalism or Zionism/anti-Zionism to explore Baghdadi participation within Jewish transnational networks.
Author: Zachary Moon
Zachary Moon explores the rich traditions of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in relationship to the field of pastoral theology. Firstly, he explores the significance of metaphor in influencing the pastoral theological imagination. This includes revisiting Seward Hiltner’s classic ‘shepherding perspective.’ Moon secondly utilizes the works of Jim Corbett in animating an alternative pastoral metaphor and claims a ‘goatwalking perspective.’ Finally, he broadly traverses the terrain of Quaker traditions, particularly those practices that pertain to compassionate care and support of spiritual wellbeing, acknowledging that the concepts of ‘pastoral theology’ and ‘pastoral care’ are largely unfamiliar within Quaker theological understanding yet asserting that Quaker traditions provide resources that aid broader pastoral theological discourse and support the healthy living out of Quaker faith in community.

In a foreword, Jim Higginbotham explores a complementary metaphor of sanctuary for pastoral theology. Inspired by Corbett's role as one of the founders of the Sanctuary Movement, sanctuary is understood as a sacred liminal space of radical hospitality connecting the pastoral and prophetic.
Author: Alessandro Arbo
What do we mean when we talk about the identity of a musical work and what does such an identity involve? What in fact are the properties that make it something worth protecting and preserving? These issues are not only of legal relevance; they are central to a philosophical discipline that has seen considerable advances over the last few decades: musical ontology. Taking into account its main theoretical models, this essay argues that an understanding of the ontological status of musical works should acknowledge the irreducible ambivalence of music as an “art of the trace” and as a “performative art.” It advocates a theory of the musical work as a “social object” and, more specifically, as a sound artefact that functions aesthetically and which is based on a trace informed by a normative value. Such a normativity is further explored in relation to three primary ways of conceiving and fixing the trace: orality, notation and phonography.