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The Leningrad Codex

A Facsimile Edition

Edited by Astrid B. Beck, David Noel Freedman and James A. Sanders

The oldest complete Hebrew Bible in the world is the Leningrad Codex. Housed in the Saltykov-Shchedrin State Public Library in St. Petersburg, Russia, and dating to 1009 C.E., the Leningrad Codex stands as the single most important extant manuscript for establishing the text of the Hebrew Bible and is the basis for virtually all critical editions of the Hebrew Bible.
In a landmark publishing event in biblical scholarship, the Leningrad Codex is now available for the first time in a facsimile edition. This beautiful scholar's edition of the Leningrad Codex, produced under the auspices of the University of Michigan in cooperation and consultation with the Ancient Biblical Manuscript Center and West Semitic Research Project, features a high quality 25,4 x 30,5 cm. hardcover format that includes sixteen full-color illuminated carpet pages that capture in precise detail the Codex's lovely medieval artwork.

Koehler and Baumgartner

To accommodate a new generation of scholars, we are reissuing the complete set of Ludwig Koehler and Walter Baumgartner's famous Lexicon in a two-volume edition. This new two-volume set will include a new 100-page introduction and an additional listing of abbreviations. It will have more than 1,900 two-column pages.

Edited by Johannes de Moor

The bilingual (Aramaic-Hebrew) concordance to the Targum of the Prophets is the product of an international project based in the Theological University of the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands, Kampen (ThUK) and supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). With this publication a major research tool becomes available to those engaged in research in Biblical and Jewish studies.
For the first time meaningful quotations from the Targum and the Masoretic Hebrew text of the Bible are set out in parallel so that the user of the concordance can study the translation technique of the Targum in much greater detail than was hitherto possible. For comparative purposes the concordance is published per book of the Prophets. Eventually a complete concordance will become available in electronic form.
The concordance makes a wealth of largely unknown material accessible to researchers. The discovery of the presumed-lost Song of the Lamb, referred to in Rev. 15:3, by members of the editorial team vividly illustrates the importance of such a concordance to both Judaic and New Testament studies. The concordance will also be an indispensable tool for the textual criticism and the history of interpretation of the Hebrew Bible.
To facilitate consultation on the basis of the Hebrew, every concordance per book contains a Hebrew-Aramaic index. The final volume will contain a cumulative Hebrew-Aramaic index.
Publication is envisaged in a total of 21 volumes of 400-450 pages each, over a five to six-year period, as follows:
Joshua, ed. Johannes C. de Moor (Kampen University) (1 vol.) January 1995 (AVAILABLE)
Judges, ed. Willem Smelik (Kampen University) (1 vol.), July 1995 (AVAILABLE)
1 & 2 Samuel, ed. Eveline van Staalduine-Sulman (Kampen University) (3 vols.), November 1995
Ezekiel, ed. Thomas J. Finley (Talbot School of Theology, Biola University, La Mirada, USA) (3 vols.), 1996
Isaiah, ed. Johannes C. de Moor (Kampen University) (3 vols.), 1997
Jeremiah, ed. Floris Sepmeijer (Kampen University) (3 vols.), 1997
1 & 2 Kings, ed. Bernard Grossfeld (The University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, USA) (3 vols.), 1998
The Twelve, ed. Johannes C. de Moor (Kampen University) (3 vols.), 1999
Index (1 vol.), 2000