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Series Editor:
Anglican-Episcopal Theology and History covers aspects of the Anglican-Episcopal tradition from the Reformation to the present, in both its historical and theological forms, including historical theology. The volumes in the series comprise monographs, themed collected studies and rigorously revised doctoral dissertations. All proposed works will be peer-reviewed. Publications are in paperback and electronic format.

This series has published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
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The Global Pentecostal and Charismatic Studies cover the Pentecostal and Charismatic movements from a variety of perspectives. The series will focus on large cultural zones so as to display contextual influences upon the Pentecostal and charismatic movements and on broad cross-cultural themes, whether these influences arise from history or from theology. The volumes within the series will treat different themes within the Pentecostal-Charismatic movements with a combination of historical, social scientific, and theological approaches.

This series has published an average of 3 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
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Studies in Reformed Theology is an international triennial series that offers thematic volumes with articles on current issues and in-depth monographs in the field of Systematic, Historical and Biblical theology.

Studies in Reformed Theology is edited by the International Reformed Theological Institute (IRTI). Established in 1995, IRTI comprises a world-wide network of scholars involved in Reformed theology. ‘Reformed’ refers to a theology in the tradition of the sixteenth-century reformation in Strasbourg, Zurich and Geneva, as an expression of Christian faith of all times and in all places.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
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In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion

Abstract

This article aims to reconsider some previous explanations, and to propose new reflections on the genesis and function of the hagiographical text known as the Apparitio Sancti Michaelis in Monte Gargano. After a brief consideration of the narrative’s environmental setting, the sections of the legend are presented and analysed. The analysis focuses on selected topics: the hagiographer’s intention to convey the idea of a cultic substitution in the Gargano, the hagiographical topos of the animal uncovering the divinity, and the symbolic value of the characters involved. The date of the work’s composition, its intent, and issues of authorship are therefore examined.

In: Religion and Theology

Abstract

This article examines how the names of “church fathers” were compiled into lists from the end of the fourth century to the middle of the sixth century. Although not as common as biblical canon lists, these lists of church fathers attempt to vest ecclesiastical authority in the figures listed. Surveying Greek and Latin Christian literature, it finds that there are two overarching strategies for listing church fathers: (1) linking individual fathers’ authority to their involvement in authoritative church councils; (2) compiling lists of names that are meant to be representative of the church’s antiquity and catholicity.

In: Religion and Theology
Free access
In: Religion and Theology

Abstract

The following study takes its cue from a body of literature that seeks to challenge the academic discourse on “religion” as transcendent, irreducible, and unique – sui generis. Naturally, a sui generis conception of religion also views religion’s objects through a lens of transcendence and divine authority. These objects possess immense meaning potential and act as social mediators in particular social contexts. In both ancient and modern times, early Christian manuscripts are examples of such religious objects. They are evidence of the literary practices of early Christians and are windows into their social contexts, reflecting how these believers navigated their socio-cultural realities. Modern scholars often use these manuscripts as evidence to postulate the existence of homogeneous Christian communities who created these texts for their theological upliftment. However, are such postulations supported by the material evidence? This paper examines one case study where 𝔓72 has been propped up as a witness to the presence of a coherent unified proto-orthodox Christian community in the fourth century CE in Egypt. The following research concludes that extant evidence points to a socio-religious context in Egypt during this period that was remarkably complex; as such, the existence of such a community cannot be supported.

In: Religion and Theology
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Abstract

The article argues that just as religion is manufactured or invented, so is tradition and history. This starting point is worked out with reference to history as a discursive construction, the past as fictioned in the present. The past does not exist independently of historical practice. History is a tool for ideological persuasion and ideological criticism in the chaotic, disputed and contested present. This understanding of historiography is brought to bear on the scholarly discourse on Christian origins, highlighting the performativity or mythic character of conventional reconstructions of the historical Jesus and the formation of early Christianity, in which sacred apologetic texts are employed as ethnographic sources. What is called for is to take leave of the “stance of the faithful,” and to reorient the study of the history of Christian origins away from a “protectionist doxa” towards a critical historiography that understands early Christian history as invented or manufactured.

In: Religion and Theology