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Volume Editor: Pim Valkenberg
A Companion to Comparative Theology offers a unique survey of a rapidly developing field of modern theology in 32 chapters coordinated by five editors. Its first part discusses some of the main historical developments in theology and religious studies before 1985 that are relevant for understanding contemporary approaches in comparative theology. The main part of the companion traces developments in five specific areas of comparative research, starting with classical approaches by Christian comparative theologians, and continuing with responses by scholars from Jewish, Islamic, Hindu, Buddhist and Chinese religious comparative perspectives. The final part of the companion highlights a number of new avenues in comparative theology, discussing new methods, new forms of awareness, new partnerships with other fields of study, and finally some preliminary conclusions.

Contributors are: Nadeen Mustafa A Alsulaimi, María Enid Barga, Bede Benjamin Bidlack, André van der Braak, Francis X. Clooney, Catherine Cornille, Jonathan Edelmann, Marianne Farina, James L. Fredericks, Rouyan Gu, Paul Hedges, Holly Hilgardner, Daniel Joslyn-Siemiatkoski, Louis Komjathy, Christian S. Krokus, LAI, Pan-chiu, Kristin Johnston Largen, John Makransky, Jerry L. Martin, Vahid Mahdavi Mehr, Marianne Moyaert, Emmanuel Nathan, Robert Cummings Neville, Hugh Nicholson, Jerusha Tanner Rhodes, Devorah Schoenfeld, Klaus von Stosch, Axel Marc Oaks Takacs, Pim Valkenberg, Maureen L. Walsh, Kijin James Wu
A Festschrift on the Occasion of the 50th Anniversary of BETH
During the past 50 years, theological libraries have confronted secularisation and religious pluralism, along with revolutionary technological developments that brought not only significant challenges but also unexpected opportunities to adopt new instruments for the transfer of knowledge through the automation and computerisation of libraries. This book shows how European theological libraries tackled these challenges; how they survived by redefining their task, by participating in the renewal of scholarly librarianship, and by networking internationally. Since 1972, BETH, the Association of European Theological Libraries, has stimulated this process by enabling contacts among a growing number of national library associations all over Europe.
The medieval dissenters known as ‘Waldenses’, named after their first founder, Valdes of Lyons, have long attracted careful scholarly study, especially from specialists writing in Italian, French and German. Waldenses were found across continental Europe, from Aragon to the Baltic and East-Central Europe. They were long-lived, resilient, and diverse. They lived in a special relationship with the prevailing Catholic culture, making use of the Church’s services but challenging its claims.

Many Waldenses are known mostly, or only, because of the punitive measures taken by inquisitors and the Church hierarchy against them. This volume brings for the first time a wide-ranging, multi-authored interpretation of the medieval Waldenses to an English-language readership, across Europe and over the four centuries until the Reformation.

Contributors include: Marina Benedetti, Peter Biller, Luciana Borghi Cedrini, Euan Cameron, Jacques Chiffoleau, Albert De Lange, Andrea Giraudo, Franck Mercier, Grado Giovanni Merlo, Georg Modestin, Martine Ostorero, Damian J. Smith, Claire Taylor, and Kathrin Utz Tremp.
Brill Research Perspectives in Theology covers state of the art analyses and critical studies in major and emerging fields in systematic, practical, historical, and intercultural theology. It provides the most up-to-date research written by a leading theologian in the field.
Each issue consists of 50 to 100 pages, including an annotated bibliography. Topics range from theologians and specific periods in the history of theology to recent trends and themes in contemporary theology, from confessional traditions to methodological debates, from classic doctrinal themes to current developments in theology and society. The Brill Research Perspectives in Theology is an invaluable resource for scholars wishing to draw on the latest theological research, as well as a dynamic resource for teaching and for students of theology and related fields.
The Editors of this series take 'Catholic Theology' to be theology that reflects on themes in systematic theology, moral theology and historical theology as these have presented or now present themselves in the Roman Catholic tradition. Moreover, Brill’s Studies in Catholic Theology includes studies that contribute to the theology of the one, holy, apostolic and Catholic Church as confessed in the Nicene Creed (as opposed to theologies of particular churches and traditions). Manuscripts published in the series will mainly be either studies on the history of Catholic theology that are relevant for the present time or constructive contributions to the articulation of Catholic theology for today. We aim at publishing high-quality academic monographs by established scholars, coherent volumes of essays and excellent PhD dissertations.

This is a new series with an average of 1,5 volumes per year.
Author: Sam Mickey
New Materialism and Theology reflects on questions of human embodiment, nonhuman agency, technological innovation, and what really matters now and in possible futures. Bringing theological inquiry together with the philosophical movement of new materialism, Sam Mickey points toward a variety of ways for thinking about matter and everything that materializes in human and more-than-human worlds. Mickey provides introductory definitions and historical context for understanding the relationship between various theological and materialist ideas and practices. He examines the self-declared novelty and materiality of new materialism, noting the limitations of those labels while articulating the very new and quite material challenges that new materialism does indeed pose, challenges of urgent existential importance that demand theological responses. New Materialism and Theology faces the theological implications and material possibilities facing humanity while ecological and technological realities seem to be pointing toward posthuman or transhuman futures or perhaps something else entirely.
Author: Sam Mickey

Abstract

This work articulates the main problems and questions that arise at the intersection of new materialism and theology. Rather than proffering a particular framework to resolve those problems and questions, the author points toward a variety of ways for engaging with them. The text is divided into three part. Part 1 provides some introductory definitions and historical context for understanding the relationship between new materialism and theology. Part 2 examines the novelty and materiality in new materialism, questioning both categories, while enumerating very new and quite material challenges that new materialism poses to theology. The concluding part considers the theological implications and material possibilities of technological developments for facilitating posthuman or transhuman futures.

In: New Materialism and Theology
Author: Sam Mickey

Abstract

This work articulates the main problems and questions that arise at the intersection of new materialism and theology. Rather than proffering a particular framework to resolve those problems and questions, the author points toward a variety of ways for engaging with them. The text is divided into three part. Part 1 provides some introductory definitions and historical context for understanding the relationship between new materialism and theology. Part 2 examines the novelty and materiality in new materialism, questioning both categories, while enumerating very new and quite material challenges that new materialism poses to theology. The concluding part considers the theological implications and material possibilities of technological developments for facilitating posthuman or transhuman futures.

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Theology
Editorial Board / Council Member: Jim Fodor and Susannah Ticciati
Brill’s Studies in Systematic Theology is a series in constructive theology, treating traditional doctrinal loci in the light of contemporary concerns. It has a strong interest in the theological engagement with Scripture, as well as the creative rereading of significant historical theologians. It includes monographs by both new and established scholars, as well as edited volumes.