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Author: Sigrun Haude
At its core, Coping with Life during the Thirty Years’ War (1618–1648) explores how people tried to survive the Thirty Years’ War, on what resources they drew, and how they attempted to make sense of it. A rich tapestry of stories brings to light contemporaries’ trauma as well as women and men’s unrelenting initiatives to stem the war’s negative consequences. Through these close-ups, Sigrun Haude shows that experiences during the Thirty Years’ War were much more diverse and often more perplexing than a straightforward story line of violence and destruction can capture. Life during the Thirty Years’ War was not a homogenous vale of gloom and doom, but a multifaceted story that was often heartbreaking, yet, at times, also uplifting.
In: Coping with Life during the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648)
In: Coping with Life during the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648)
In: Coping with Life during the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648)
In: Coping with Life during the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648)
In: Coping with Life during the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648)
In Sources of Slavic Pre-Christian Religion Juan Antonio Álvarez-Pedrosa presents the original texts as well as English translations of all known medieval sources that inform us about the religion practiced by the Slavs before their Christianization. Since the Slavs did not have a written culture before their conversion to Christianity, all the texts were authored by people who were involved in this long process or in contact with the Slavs. For this reason, the texts come from a lengthy period from the ninth to the fifteenth century. Since the texts were originally written in seven different ancient languages, the present book is the result of the work of a large team of specialists.

Abstract

This chapter includes those texts which contain references to Slavic Pre-Christian Religion, which are extremely doubtful, either because they are very old (and, therefore, the Slavs had not completed their process of ethnogenesis), because they may not refer to the Slavs but to another people, because they are based on a highly questionable interpretation, or simply because they probably constitute a fanciful account.

In: Sources of Slavic Pre-Christian Religion

Abstract

The introduction clarifies the objectives of the book, the methodology used, the structure of the book and gives explanations about the selection of the texts in the anthology.

In: Sources of Slavic Pre-Christian Religion

Abstract

In this chapter we find Arabic texts written by Arab travelers that give us information about the religious practices of Slavs (and Scandinavians) settled in the area of the Great Rivers of Rus’, with particular interest for the description of funeral rituals.

In: Sources of Slavic Pre-Christian Religion