Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 799 items for :

  • Translation Studies x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
This volume tells the story of the Arabic translations of the Church Fathers. By tracing the history of major translation centres, such as Palestine, Sinai, and Antioch, it describes how Middle Eastern Christians translated into Arabic, preserved, and engaged with their Patristic heritage. In addition to well known authors, such as Gregory of Nazianzus, Ephrem the Syrian, and Dionysius the Areopagite, the volume presents a Patristic treatise written in Greek but preserved only in Arabic: the Noetic Paradise. Finally, by reconstructing a lost Arabic Dionysian paraphrase used by the Muslim theologian al-Ghazali, the volume explores Patristic influences on Islamic thought.
English Translation of the Thirteenth-Century Cookbook Anwāʿ al-Ṣaydala fī Alwān al-Aṭʿima with Introduction and Glosssary
Author:
The medieval cookbook Anwāʿ al-ṣaydala fī alwān al-aṭʿima, with its remarkable collection of over 460 recipes, is a tangible testimony to the richness and sophistication of the cuisine of Muslim Sapin. Its diverse recipes reflect a pluralistic society of ethnic and religious communities that found a common ground for a collective culture. It further displays a rich regional vocabulary and the material culture it represents.
This text has been a culinary diamond in the rough ever since its first publication in the early 1960s, based on a single damaged and titleless manuscript with misplaced folios. In this new translation, Anwāʿ al-ṣaydala is now a polished gem. It is based on a recently discovered manuscript that is in good condition. For the first time in any language, this translation is the closest representation of the original text that the author/compiler constructed.
Supplemented with an extensive introduction and glossaries, and enlivened with over 270 color illustrations depicting medieval life.
Also includes are modern adaptations of twenty-five recipes.
Dive into the future of language education with our guide, blending innovation with practical application. Unlock the power of gamification, digital storytelling, and AI to make learning more engaging and effective. Transform classes into dynamic, interactive experiences that captivate students. Master classroom response systems and utilize social networks to enhance educational outcomes. This book is a must-have for educators seeking to revolutionize their teaching methods and bring languages to life. Get ready to elevate your teaching strategies and inspire your students. Embrace the change and lead the way in modern language education.
Semiotics: Signs of the Times is Brill’s new series devoted to the study of semiotics across disciplines. This book series starts from the general idea of semiotic signs, divided into icons, indexes, and symbols. Semiotics gives meaning to signs, sign functions, and sign processes. It is also concerned with sign-users (senders and receivers) and how signs are transmitted from one organism to another. To give meaning happens in everyday experience as well as experimentation. Semiotics seeks to discover how the signs of language, gestures, visual images, music, dance, theater, as well as medical and psychological symptoms, architecture, and political theory embark with a theory of signs to give belief, values, and techniques which serve for theoretical foundations and interdisciplinary method in sciences and humanities.
Semiotics: Signs of the Times invites contributions on the newest trend of cultural research in linguistics, literature, fine arts, philosophy, biology, anthropology, folklore, technology, and other fields. The series is open to new synthesis of techniques of research, experiences, memories, and myth with new meanings.

Proposals for single-authored monographs and edited volumes are equally welcome.
All submissions are subject to a double anonymous peer-review process prior to publication.
Authors are equally invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.
Please advise our Guidelines for a Book Proposal.
BRILL strongly recommends the use of the MLA Handbook of Style or the Chicago Manual of Style for this series.
Thinking with Stephanos Stephanides
Volume Editor:
The book captures key moments in the critical and creative dialogue of literary scholars, poets and artists with poet, author, documentary film-maker and literary scholar Stephanos Stephanides. Employing a polyphonic and cross-disciplinary perspective, the twenty-three essays and creative pieces flow together in cycles of continuities and discontinuities, emulating Stephanides’s fluid and transgressive universe. Drawing on the broad topic of borders and crossings, Shifting Horizons and Crossing Borders offers critical material on themes such as space and place, dislocation and migration, journeys and bridges, movement and fluidity, the aesthetics and the politics of the sea, time, nostalgia and (trans)cultural memory, identity and poetics, translation and translatability, home and homecoming. An invaluable reference for anyone interested in the crosscurrents between the poetic, the cultural and the political.
Approaches to Translation Studies is an international series promoting the scholarly study of translation. The notion of plural ‘approaches’ to translation and its study calls up images of scholarly explorers following untrodden paths to translation, or more cautiously (re)tracing the familiar routes. Either way, it indicates a refusal to be tied to dogma or prejudice, a curiosity about possible new vistas, and an awareness that the observer’s view depends on where s/he comes from. But a recognition of the plurality of possible approaches does not necessarily mean passive acquiescence to relativism and scepticism. The idea of ‘approaching’ translation also implies a sense of purpose and direction.

In the context of today’s globalised and pluralised world, this metaphorically suggested perspective is perhaps more relevant than ever before. The series therefore remains fully committed to it, while trying to respond to the rapid changes of our digital age. Ready to travel between genres, media and technologies, willing to span centuries and continents, and always keeping an open mind about the various oppositions that have too often needlessly divided researchers (e.g. high culture versus popular culture, linguistics versus literary studies versus cultural studies, translation ‘proper’ versus ‘adaptation’), the series Approaches to Translation Studies will continue to accommodate all translation-oriented books that match high-quality scholarship with an equal concern for reader-friendly communication.

Approaches to Translation Studies is open to a wide range of scholarly publications in the field of Translation Studies (monographs, collective volumes…). Dissertations are welcome but will obviously need to be thoroughly adapted to their new function and readership. Conference proceedings and collections of articles will only be considered if they show strong thematic unity and tight editorial control. For practical reasons, the series intends to continue its tradition of publishing English-language research. While students, teachers and scholars in the various schools and branches of Translation Studies make up its primary readership, the series also aims to promote a dialogue with readers and authors from various neighbouring disciplines.

Approaches to Translation Studies was launched in 1970 by James S Holmes (1924-1986), who was also one of the ‘founding fathers’ of Translation Studies as an academic discipline. At later stages the series’ editorship passed into the hands of Raymond van den Broeck, Kitty M. van Leuven-Zwart and Ton Naaijkens. Being the very first international series specifically catering for the needs of the fledgling discipline in the 1970s, Approaches to Translation Studies has played a significant historical role in providing it with a much needed platform as well as giving it greater visibility in the academic marketplace.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

Volumes 2, 4, and 5 were published by Van Gorcum (Assen, The Netherlands), but orders should be directed to Brill | Rodopi.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Winner of the 2021 Sheikh Hamad Award for Translation and International Understanding (category: translation from Arabic into English)

This is an unabridged, annotated, translation of the great Damascene savant and saint Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya’s (d. 751/1350) Madārij al-Sālikīn. Conceived as a critical commentary on an earlier Sufi classic by the great Hanbalite scholar Abū Ismāʿīl of Herat, Madārij aims to rejuvenate Sufism’s Qurʾanic foundations. The original work was a key text for the Sufi initiates, composed in terse, rhyming prose as a master’s instruction to the aspiring seeker on the path to God, in a journey of a hundred stations whose ultimate purpose was to be lost to one’s self (fanāʾ) and subsist (baqāʾ) in God. The translator, Ovamir (ʿUwaymir) Anjum, provides an extensive introduction and annotation to this English-Arabic face-to-face presentation of this masterpiece of Islamic psychology.
Author:
This monograph offers the first-ever, full-length analysis of the most irreverent book of Italian Futurism: L’anguria lirica, printed in 1934 on tin metal sheets, with design and poetic text by Tullio d’Albisola and illustrations by Bruno Munari. This study, which features the unabridged reproduction of the pages of the tin book, accompanied by the first English translation of the poem, aims to disentangle the complex relationship between text and image in this total artwork. It shows how the endless series of material transformations at its core – of woman into food, of love into desecrating religion, of man into machine, of poetry into matter – fostered a radical change in poetry-writing, thus breaking away from a stagnant lyrical past.
In: Italian Futurism and the Poetry of Materiality