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A Critique of the Sinocentric Paradigm
Devised to legitimize the Republic of China’s claim over Inner Asia, the Sinocentric paradigm stems from the Open Door Policy and Chinese nationalism. Advanced against the conquest theory, and rationalized as the pathfinding ecological theory, it is an evolutionary materialist scheme that became the vision of history.
Exposing the initial agenda of this paradigm and revealing its fundamental contradictions, The Nomadic Leviathan debunks it as a myth. Resurrecting the conquest theory, and reinforcing it with the idea of extrahuman transportation, this book places pastoralism at the origin of the state and civilization, and the Eurasian steppe at the center of human history; the political emerges as the primary and fundamental order defining the social and economic.
The stone monuments of Mongolia’s Altai Mountains trace the web of ancient cultures across that remote land. This study breaks new ground by seeking their cultural significance from within their physical locations and viewsheds.
It is the first study to join the mute stone monuments to the vivid petroglyphic rock art of that region. In that and in the examination of a monument’s individualizing details, I seek to recover the impulse of original intention, the way in which monument and location fix cultural memory, and the way in which memory finally gives way to the cultural development of myth.
Texts, Traditions and Practices, 10th-21st Centuries
Memory and Commemoration across Central Asia: Texts, Traditions and Practices, 10th-21st Centuries is a collection of fourteen studies by a group of scholars active in the field of Central Asian Studies, presenting new research into various aspects of the rich cultural heritage of Central Asia (including Afghanistan). By mapping and exploring the interaction between political, ideological, literary and artistic production in Central Asia, the contributors offer a wide range of perspectives on the practice and usage of historical and religious commemoration in different contexts and timeframes. Making use of different approaches – historical, literary, anthropological, or critical heritage studies, the contributors show how memory functions as a fundamental constituent of identity formation in both past and present, and how this has informed perceptions in and outside Central Asia today.
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One of the most important landslides in recent World History has been the fall of the Soviet Union. Though its consequences are felt everywhere, once again in its long history Central or Inner Asia, given its many religious, economical, and historical backgrounds and identities, will play an important role in the formation of a new balance in Asia. It is exactly the history, literature, religion, arts, economy and politics of these Inner Asian cultures and societies that Brill's Inner Asian Library series will be dedicated to.
The peer-reviewed series aims at furthering our understanding of Inner Asia and enabling us to better cope with the problems past, present and future connected with this region.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
The Inner Asia book series is published in association with the Mongolia and Inner Asia Studies Unit (MIASU), Cambridge. MIASU was founded in 1986 as a group within the Department of Social Anthropology to promote research and teaching relating to Mongolia and Inner Asia on an interdisciplinary basis. The unit aims to promote and encourage study of this important region within and without the University of Cambridge, and to provide training and support for research to all those concerned with its understanding.
Together with the Inner Asia journal, the book series provides a research-oriented forum in which scholars can address the contemporary and historical problems of the region.

Thirty years after the fall of Soviet power, we are beginning to understand that the experience of Muslims in the USSR continued patterns of adaptation and negotiation known from Muslim history in the lands that became the Soviet Union, and in other regions as well; we can also now understand that the long history of Muslims situating religious authority locally, in the various regions that came under Soviet rule, in fact continued through the Soviet era into post-Soviet times.
The present volume is intended to historicize the question of religious authority in Muslim Central Eurasia, through historical and anthropological case studies about the exercise, negotiation, or institutionalization of authority, from the nineteenth to the early twenty-first century; it thus seeks to frame Islamic religious history in the areas shaped by Russian and Soviet rule in terms of issues relevant to Muslims themselves, as Muslims, rather than solely in terms of questions of colonial rule.

Contributors are Sergei Abashin, Ulfat Abdurasulov, Bakhtiyar Babajanov, Devin DeWeese, Allen J. Frank, Benjamin Gatling, Agnès Kefeli, Paolo Sartori, Wendell Schwab, Pavel Shabley, Shamil Shikhaliev, and William A. Wood.
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This first and only English translation of Rong Xinjiang’s The Silk Road and Cultural Exchanges Between East and West is a collection of 28 papers on the history of the Silk Road and the interactions among the peoples and cultures of East and Central Asia, including the so-called Western Regions in modern-day Xinjiang. Each paper is a masterly study that combines information obtained from historical records with excavated materials, such as manuscripts, inscriptions and artefacts. The new materials primarily come from north-western China, including sites in the regions of Dunhuang, Turfan, Kucha, and Khotan. The book contains a wealth of original insights into nearly every aspect of the complex history of this region.
In A Dictionary of Early Middle Turkic Hendrik Boeschoten describes the lexical material contained in works written in different varieties of Eastern Turkic in and around the fourteenth century, e.g. before the classical age of Chaghatay Turkic; late Karakhanid, Khwarezmian Turkic, Golden Horde Turkic, Mamluk Turkic, and early Azeri. As the existing, previously published dictionaries are now antiquated and hardly cover this period (most relevant works were not yet known at their time of writing), A Dictionary of Early Middle Turkic is a most welcome addition to the field.
A Festschrift in Honor of Peter G. Riddell
This volume is a collection of essays on transregional aspects of Malay-Indonesian Islam and Islamic Studies, based on Peter G. Riddell’s broad interest and expertise. Particular attention is paid to rare manuscripts, unique inscriptions, Qurʾān commentaries and translations, textbooks, and personal and public archives. This book invites readers to reconstruct the ways in which Malay-Indonesian Islam and Islamic studies have been structured.

Contributors are Khairudin Aljunied, Majid Daneshgar, R. Michael Feener, Annabel Teh Gallop, Mulaika Hijjas, Andrew Peacock, Johanna Pink, Gregorius Dwi Kuswanta, Michael Laffan, Han Hsien Liew, Julian Millie, Ervan Nurtawab, Masykur Syafruddin, Edwin P. Wieringa and Farouk Yahya.