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From a survivor parent to the next generation
Known for its breathtaking scenery, the central-east African country of Rwanda lived through one of the worst episodes of violence of the late 20th century, known as the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, in which over a million people were brutally murdered in 100 days.This book recounts the personal story of Claver Irakoze who survived the genocide as an eleven-year-old child and, like other Rwandans of his generation, is now grappling with the heavy responsibility of raising children in the post-genocide context.Tracing the various stages of Irakoze’s life experiences, each chapter teases out issues surrounding childhood, parenting and the transmission of memories between generations. The final chapter draws on Irakoze’s personal and professional experience to provide some reflections on managing memories of genocide within the family.
We are currently experiencing an unprecedented era in the history of the planet. Our addiction to fossil fuels and powerful technologies is dangerously altering the Earth’s natural systems, giving rise to well-documented global crises of climate change, plastic pollution of the oceans, and tragic loss of biocultural diversity.

These crises have created a unique challenge for STEM educators, given that STEM disciplinary knowledge and skills are often viewed as the panacea to the world’s economic and environmental problems. This popular view tends to focus narrowly, however, on students learning scientific, technological, engineering and mathematical concepts about the world out there, thereby ignoring the crucial role education must play in shaping students’ attitudes and values – their inner worlds – that drive moral agency to live and work in sustainable ways. It is moral agency that empowers socially and environmentally responsible citizens to tackle global crises.

In this timely book you will read inspiring stories of how professional educators in STEM-related fields have embraced transformative learning and arts education to develop and implement integrated STEAM education programs and practices that are preparing young people with special capabilities and values to actively contribute to the sustainable development of a world in crisis.
Volume Editor: Amani Khalaf Alghamdi
In March 2020, as the world was still baffled with the unknowns of the COVID-19 pandemic, Alghamdi began documenting how teaching and learning in higher education changed its face as a result of the global health outbreak. The outbreak of the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) was first reported from Wuhan, China, and soon swept the world over. Teachers across the globe, including Saudi Arabia, began undertaking a plethora of on-the-ground work to combat and alleviate the impact of the pandemic.

Teaching in the Pandemic Era in Saudi Arabia presents to educators, parents, and other interested readers a variety of perspectives, challenges, and highlights of the teaching methods that could be useful in the era of COVID-19. Its purposes are to not only document an important time of human history, education, and the outbreak of unknown pandemics but also outline strategies to serve as insights into and predictions of the unknown future of humanity, diseases, and human learning.
Series Editors: Paul R. Carr and Gina Thésée
This book series aims to develop a field of overlapping research that crosses and integrates the domains, disciplines, subjects and themes of cultural pluralism, democracy and social justice. Each theme is taken up individually in many debates but our focus is to bring together advanced and critical analyses that transcend boundaries, languages, disciplines and theoretical and conceptual approaches. We are interested in books that can problematize cultural pluralism in relation to, with and around democracy and socio-environmental justice, especially in relation to education. Our focus on cultural pluralism is intentional, and we aim to move the debate on identity, difference and lived experience forward within a critical lens, seeking to create new, varied and meaningful discussions that go beyond the normative labels of multiculturalism and interculturalism. The literature around education for democracy that underscores political literacy, critical engagement and transformative education is also highly relevant here as is the field of social justice, which examines power relations, laws and policies, structures and experiences at myriad levels. The guiding principles for books in this series include: critical analysis; interdisciplinary; nuanced and complexified thinking; epistemological interrogation; varied research approaches; innovation; openness to international and comparative studies. The books in this series will include case studies, comparative analyses, and collaborations across linguistic, social, ethnic, racial, national, religious and gender boundaries, which may include empirical, conceptual and theoretical frameworks and analysis.
While not an exhaustive or exclusive list, some of the areas that will be of interest for this book series include: Migration, immigration and displacement; Identity and power; Globalization, neoliberalism and cultural pluralism; Critical epistemology; Democracy and diversity; Social justice and environmental justice; Media analyses and studies; Macro-sociological studies; Political ecology; Cultural diversity; Educational change.

For more information about this series or contribution, contact the editors: Paul R. Carr (pcarr@gmail.com), Gina Thésée (ginathesee@hotmail.com) or Aquisitions Editor John Bennett.

If you are interested in submitting a proposal please submit the following: a 500-word summary of your book proposal, including the title; focus and research questions; the connection to the book series; the theoretical and/or conceptual framework; the major themes to be explored; a draft table of contents; type of book: single author, edited, etc.; 10 keywords; a 150-word biography for each author/editor; confirmation that the contents of the book have not been published elsewhere; also include your CV.v

Abstract

This article reviews collaborative partnerships in the field of education investigating four different models of partnership: (1) The School-Community Partnership Model; (2.) The Public-Private Partnership Model (ppp); (3) Transnational Strategic Collaborative Partnerships; and, (4) The Model of Partnership as Collaboration and Social Innovation in the new digital economy.

In: Beijing International Review of Education

Abstract

International student education in China is an important aspect of the Belt and Road Initiative (bri) construction, as well as a beginning point for enhancing the internationalization level of education. China has become the world’s top ten recipients of international students, and its worldwide influence on education is increasing. This research investigates the factors that influence the scale of international students in China and the impact of the bri on education by employing the “Push-Pull Theory”. In particular, we find that joining the bri will significantly increase a country’s student scale in China, both for degree and non-degree education. This effect is especially noticeable in the African region, as well as in middle- and low-income countries. These empirical findings support policy implications for international student education in China.

In: Beijing International Review of Education

Abstract

This paper is focused on a variety of approaches and paths to increase and advance international education partnerships. It studies methods in general considering their theoretical frameworks as well as their aspirations, goals, and outcomes. It also presents exemplary models currently used in Eastern and Western higher education that are largely applicable to most universities. The paper also notes areas of impact that international education partnerships can have on teaching, learning, and research because of national educational differences, multi-cultural perspectives, and global interconnectedness. In addition, it highlights two exemplary models of international education partnerships at Beijing Normal University. Throughout, the paper references essays included in this special issue as well as elsewhere. The underlying theme in this essay and the special issue is that universities contribute to the integrity of education as well as global peace by increasing, updating, and assessing international education partnerships that facilitate meaningful global interactions and shared learning among faculty, students, and universities.

Free access
In: Beijing International Review of Education
Author: Hangyin Qin

Abstract

A humanistic approach to education has been central in the field of international education. China has positively responded to the international action of the United Nations plan in Education 2030 with a concrete strategic plan. Although challenges remain, China’s development of a modern lifelong learning system involving all levels of education in formal and non-formal education aims at ensuring the right of all people to an education; and it lays the foundation for educational equity. Traditional Chinese education philosophy and teaching/learning practice containing the spirit of humanism should be treasured both by China and the world. A humanistic approach to education reflects the convergence between China and the world, and modernity and tradition. Supporting the education of developing countries reflects a positive attitude and responsible action contributing to the common destiny of humanity.

In: Beijing International Review of Education

Abstract

This article describes international educational partnerships developed in the intellectual tradition of John Dewey’s philosophies of pragmatism and progressive education. In his international work in China and Japan, Dewey sought what might be called “collective intelligence” via cross-cultural experiences fostering democracy through international understanding of the multiple “truths” endemic to different cultures. These partnerships provide models for consideration at a time of growing global unease in the wake of contemporary international tensions somewhat reminiscent of what was described in the United States after World War ii as the Cold War. If anything, current tensions are more complex, intractable, and dangerous because they are driven not only by “superpower” rivalries, but also by regional conflicts involving religious ideologies, mass human migrations, urgent environmental problems, and widespread terrorism and violence. Created primarily during the 1970s and 1980s, the described educational partnerships were intended to foster international understanding through exchanges that paralleled the citizen “people to people” movements of the time that provided critical popular support enabling leaders in the United States, Europe, and the Soviet Union to bring an end to the Cold War and, for a time, collaborate in the optimistic expectation of creating a new world order of cooperation, understanding, and stability.

In: Beijing International Review of Education
In: Beijing International Review of Education