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This is a supplement book series for the Journal of Eastern Christian Studies. The series aims to publish peer-reviewed essays and monographs covering the world of Eastern and Oriental Christianity. Their major interest is in historical-contextual studies and in all types of interaction in past and present between various Christian denominations and with non-Christian religious traditions (inter- and intra-religious dialogue and conflict, “World Orthodoxy”, Christianity in the Islamicate world). Within this perspective, the journal and the series welcome contributions of a (religious-)historical, social scientific, and philological nature or combinations of these and other relevant approaches.
This book solves the long-standing mystery of a Christian monastery near Samarkand, seen and described by two Arab travellers in the tenth century. Despite several attempts made since the 1890s, its precise location had never been established. The first part covers the quest, the find, and the archaeological excavations’ results. Then the author proceeds to search for a mediaeval Christian enclave near modern Tashkent, which appears to have been washed away by a river that changed its course over centuries.
Apart from the Christians, the book also touches upon the Manichaeans, Buddhists, Zoroastrians and other Sogdians, their languages, faiths, and material remnants.
Volume Editor: Pim Valkenberg
A Companion to Comparative Theology offers a unique survey of a rapidly developing field of modern theology in 32 chapters coordinated by five editors. Its first part discusses some of the main historical developments in theology and religious studies before 1985 that are relevant for understanding contemporary approaches in comparative theology. The main part of the companion traces developments in five specific areas of comparative research, starting with classical approaches by Christian comparative theologians, and continuing with responses by scholars from Jewish, Islamic, Hindu, Buddhist and Chinese religious comparative perspectives. The final part of the companion highlights a number of new avenues in comparative theology, discussing new methods, new forms of awareness, new partnerships with other fields of study, and finally some preliminary conclusions.

Contributors are: Nadeen Mustafa A Alsulaimi, María Enid Barga, Bede Benjamin Bidlack, André van der Braak, Francis X. Clooney, Catherine Cornille, Jonathan Edelmann, Marianne Farina, James L. Fredericks, Rouyan Gu, Paul Hedges, Holly Hilgardner, Daniel Joslyn-Siemiatkoski, Louis Komjathy, Christian S. Krokus, LAI, Pan-chiu, Kristin Johnston Largen, John Makransky, Jerry L. Martin, Vahid Mahdavi Mehr, Marianne Moyaert, Emmanuel Nathan, Robert Cummings Neville, Hugh Nicholson, Jerusha Tanner Rhodes, Devorah Schoenfeld, Klaus von Stosch, Axel Marc Oaks Takacs, Pim Valkenberg, Maureen L. Walsh, Kijin James Wu
A Festschrift on the Occasion of the 50th Anniversary of BETH
During the past 50 years, theological libraries have confronted secularisation and religious pluralism, along with revolutionary technological developments that brought not only significant challenges but also unexpected opportunities to adopt new instruments for the transfer of knowledge through the automation and computerisation of libraries. This book shows how European theological libraries tackled these challenges; how they survived by redefining their task, by participating in the renewal of scholarly librarianship, and by networking internationally. Since 1972, BETH, the Association of European Theological Libraries, has stimulated this process by enabling contacts among a growing number of national library associations all over Europe.

Abstract

This article centres on the emblem book Jesus en de Ziel, Een Geestelycke Spiegel voor ’t Gemoed, first published in Amsterdam in 1678, with texts and images composed by Jan Luyken. From the time of its first publication, the book was part of the literary devotional life of the Dutch Republic, undergoing numerous editions and reprints, at least until the final decades of the eighteenth century. Using the information provided by Book Sales Catalogues, the article explores different modes in which Jesus en de Ziel was consumed, paying attention to the material conditions under which the object was provided and acquired by the consumer. The emblem book, as a religious object, was constantly reconfigured and mobilized by their manufacturers, their providers, and by the consumers themselves. I argue that these patterns of consumption, elucidated by the catalogues, can make a fundamental contribution for historical and cultural research on religious practices.

Open Access
In: Church History and Religious Culture
In: Church History and Religious Culture
Author: Johannes Tromp

Abstract

“A Brief Sketch of the Christian Faith,” published in 1632, was written by Conradus Vorstius in 1620, at the request of Johannes Uytenbogaert. Uytenbogaert needed a Confession for the Remonstrant Society he had just founded, and asked Vorstius to assist the committee that was established for its production. Vorstius, who at the time lived in difficult conditions, was unable to deliver a full text, but managed to provide this Sketch, which was subsequently used by Simon Episcopius to compose his famous Remonstrant Confession. Vorstius’s sketch was never intended for publication.

Open Access
In: Church History and Religious Culture

Abstract

Everard appears frequently in studies of English antinomianism. His sermons, printed posthumously in 1653, reveal a startling array of influences, from Maimonides to Nicholas of Cusa, and a propensity for extravagant glosses on scripture. Notably, Everard saw the gospel as an allegory for the spiritual regeneration of the reader. The literal or ‘living’ sense of scripture played out in the annihilation and resurrection of the individual conscience-as-script. Starting with those few divines who chose to celebrate rather than disparage him, this article considers Everard’s work as a particularly colorful, but not altogether unrepresentative, sample in the thorny history of sixteenth and seventeenth century Protestant hermeneutics. Specially, Everard’s work constitutes a unique merger of an older spiritual tradition with Protestant discourse on the literal sense which not only addressed long-standing issues in Puritan thought but had a real claim to the mainstream in Cromwell’s England.

In: Church History and Religious Culture