Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 4,012 items for :

  • Religion & Society x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author: Sam Mickey
New Materialism and Theology reflects on questions of human embodiment, nonhuman agency, technological innovation, and what really matters now and in possible futures. Bringing theological inquiry together with the philosophical movement of new materialism, Sam Mickey points toward a variety of ways for thinking about matter and everything that materializes in human and more-than-human worlds. Mickey provides introductory definitions and historical context for understanding the relationship between various theological and materialist ideas and practices. He examines the self-declared novelty and materiality of new materialism, noting the limitations of those labels while articulating the very new and quite material challenges that new materialism does indeed pose, challenges of urgent existential importance that demand theological responses. New Materialism and Theology faces the theological implications and material possibilities facing humanity while ecological and technological realities seem to be pointing toward posthuman or transhuman futures or perhaps something else entirely.
Author: Sam Mickey

Abstract

This work articulates the main problems and questions that arise at the intersection of new materialism and theology. Rather than proffering a particular framework to resolve those problems and questions, the author points toward a variety of ways for engaging with them. The text is divided into three part. Part 1 provides some introductory definitions and historical context for understanding the relationship between new materialism and theology. Part 2 examines the novelty and materiality in new materialism, questioning both categories, while enumerating very new and quite material challenges that new materialism poses to theology. The concluding part considers the theological implications and material possibilities of technological developments for facilitating posthuman or transhuman futures.

In: New Materialism and Theology

Abstract

Place shapes people (who will in turn shape it); it reveals the contextual nature of religions and their theologies, implying that certain phenomena can have a disruptive impact on the theological domain, rendering it an on-going reflective enterprise. In this article I seek to construct a public theology that responds to the disruption of displacement. To this end, I rehearse some of the theoretical considerations on the precarious nature of the human condition of displacement in order to appraise its disruptive potential. Then I draw on Gregory of Nyssa’s homilies on almsgiving to generate a theological account of public mercy that addresses itself to this condition of displacement. Finally, I will accentuate the desirability of mercy as a public virtue, arguing that its decline in contemporary public life and the diminishing consensus on its meaning in current scholarly discourses is disastrous.

In: International Journal of Public Theology
Author: Clive Pearson

From its inception it has been a practice of the International Journal of Public Theology to publish selected articles out of the triennial consultation of the Global Network of Public Theology. The locations for these consultations have alternated in a deliberate fashion between the northern and southern hemisphere: they have striven as such to reflect the glocalized nature of this discipline. The host institution for the consultation is encouraged to set the theme for the papers to be presented. The 2019 consultation was held in Bamberg, Germany. Its theme had to do with ‘space and place’.

On this

Free access
In: International Journal of Public Theology
Free access
In: International Journal of Public Theology

The articles in this special issue originate from the consultation of the Global Network for Public Theology at the Dietrich-Bonhoeffer-Research-Centre for Public Theology at Bamberg University in 2019. The selected papers reflect the geographically and theologically diverse discussion of the consultation. Other parts of the consultation will be published separately in the anthology Space and Place as a Topic for Public Theology, edited by Thomas Wabel et al.

The Bamberg consultation addressed many dimensions of the topic space and place: space / place to live, sacred space, space and speech, politics of space, God and space. In the

Free access
In: International Journal of Public Theology

Abstract

This article has been generated from observations to do with public theology being exercised in an ecumenical space: that context was the World Council of Churches Assembly in 2013. Some participants sought to create an inclusive safe space for conversation on LGBTQI+ exclusion; they wished to voice the concerns, hurts, gifts and joys of living in the hyphenated queer-Christian experience. When the topic of human sexuality arose in business sessions, Orthodox Church representatives raised ‘blue cards’ which indicated their dissent. Looking behind the ‘blue cards’ there is a mismatch of Orthodox approaches to understanding liberation theology as the basis of those seeking to engage a public theology response to sexuality in the WCC ecumenical space.

In: International Journal of Public Theology
Katharina Eberlein-Braun

is Assistant Professor at Bamberg University (Germany) and the managing director of the Dietrich Bonhoeffer Research Centre for Public Theology. Her research fields are the embeddedness of religion in culture and society, aesthetics, habits and ethics, critical theory and Karl Barth.

Tony Franklin-Ross

is an ordained presbyter-theologian in the Methodist Church of New Zealand, and has served in parish, regional and national leadership in the church. He has practical and academic involvement in ecumenism; he has a particular interest in queer theology. He has undergraduate and post-graduate honours degrees in commerce and theology (Auckland), and is a post-graduate

In: International Journal of Public Theology
Author: Kathrin Winkler

Abstract

Post-migrant societies in Europe are characterized by political, cultural, religious, and social changes. Where people meet under the conditions of migration and globalization, new places and spaces of negotiating are arising. They are formed by provocative questions, dynamic reorientation, and social transformation, in particular regarding religious affiliations, contexts and experiences. This article will consider challenges and the resources of religion in terms of coping with ambiguity and building up post-migrant community relations. In this context, the concept of the ‘contact zone’ as a post-migrant place or space provides an insight to social spaces where cultures and religions meet, clash and grapple with each other, often in emotionally charged contexts of highly asymmetrical relations of power, like displacement and their aftermaths. These contact zones offer a place of discussing power, oppression, and religious diversities, but also find innovative perspectives for post-migrant identities. With reference to this, three case studies based on experiences of refugees in Europe with contact zones in refugee centers, schools and educational institutions allow for an understanding of the significance of places, the feeling of rootlessness and the findings of new places of religious identity, of ‘embodied’ habitation and participation. Finally, this article emphasizes the meaning of public speech in post-migrant societies from a Christian perspective.

In: International Journal of Public Theology
Author: David Thang Moe

Bonnie Miriam Jacob, ed, Public Theology: Exploring Expressions of the Christian Faith (Bengaluru, Primalogue & TRACI, 2020), pp. xi–415, ISBN 978-93-82759-37-9 (pbk).

This Festschrift is an expression of deep appreciation to the pioneering life and prophetic work of C. K. Samuel. It is published by the TRACI community and its friends who have all been inspired in one way or another by Samuel’s contributions to the distinctive nature of an Indian public theology. Samuel was significant for leading Theological Research and Communication Institute (TRACI). Not surprisingly the volume

In: International Journal of Public Theology