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This book develops a distinctive account of the structure of the human mind, integrating traditional theoretical tools of cognitive science with results on situated cognition. According to the resulting view, a wide variety of materials co-contribute to the production of virtually all forms of human behavior. The bag of co-contributors is so mixed that we must abandon the commitment to a largely autonomous, isolated mental arena – that of the conscious mind or of the personal level – and instead make sense of ourselves and our behavior as the activity of a more loosely structured collection of mechanisms, including a vast number of representations many of which are redundant in their content, that collaborate in overlapping subsets to produce intelligent behavior.
Author:
In this book, Michael Barlow describes ways in which corpus data can be used to provide insights into various aspects of grammar, taking a usage-based perspective. The book deals with both the practical and the theoretical aspects of using corpora for language analysis. Some of the topics covered include corpora and usage-based linguistics, collocations and constructions, categorisation in everyday language, blends, and discourse organisation. A couple of recurring themes in the volume are (i) the relationship between theory and data and (ii) the importance and consequences of looking at individual variation in language use.
Studies in Genesis, Job and Linguistics in Honor of Ellen van Wolde
Volume Editors: and
Nineteen friends and colleagues present this Festschrift to Ellen van Wolde, honouring her life-long contribution to the field of Biblical studies. The contributions focus on the major topics that define her research: the books of Genesis and of Job, and study of the Hebrew language. Profoundly inspired by the lasting legacy of the jubilarian, the articles present innovative and thought-provoking developments in the linguistic study of the Hebrew Bible, with a particular attention to cognitive linguistics, and in the research – literary as well as linguistic – of two of its most fascinating books.
The ‘face’ is the most identifiable feature of the human body, yet the way it is entrenched in language and cognition has not previously been explored cross-linguistically. This comparative volume continues the series on embodied cognition and conceptualization with a focus on the human ‘face’. Each contribution to this volume presents descriptions and analyses of how languages name the ‘face’ and utilize metonymy, metaphor, and polysemy to extend the ‘face’ to overlapping target domains. The contributions include primary and secondary data representing languages originating from around the world. The chapters represent multiple theoretical approaches to describing linguistic embodiment, including cultural, historical, descriptive, and cognitive frameworks. The findings from this diverse set of theoretical approaches and languages contribute to general research in cognitive linguistics, cultural linguistics, and onomastics.
Animacy influences the grammar of languages in different ways, although it often goes unnoticed. Did you know that in English there is a strong tendency towards using the Saxon genitive ’s with humans instead of the preposition of? Have you ever hear that some Chinantecan languages encode the animate/inanimate distinction in almost every word, and that in Hatam only human nouns distinguish plural number? This book offers for the first time a comprehensive cross-linguistic study of its effects on morphological systems. How do real data fit the theorethical definition of animacy? Do we observe different types of animacy? Which techniques are employed to encode it? Which categories and features are affected, and how? Data from more than 300 languages provide answers to these (and other) questions.
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This annotated commentary delineating Michel Pêcheux’s materialist discourse theory anticipates the formation of a real social science to supersede the metaphysical meanings ‘always-already-there’ instituted by empirical ideology. Structures of Language presents Pêcheux’s consequential work in respect of Ferdinand de Saussure’s epistemological breakthrough that founded the science of linguistics: the theoretical separation of sound from meaning.

Noam Chomsky’s generative grammar, John Searle’s philosophy of language, B.F. Skinner’s indwelling agents, J.L. Austin’s speech situations, Jacques Lacan’s symbolic order, and the influential theories of other linguistic researchers, are cited to explain imaginary semantic systems. The broader implications for structural metaphysics in language use are tacitly conveyed.
In: Structures of Language: Notes Towards a Systematic Investigation
In: Structures of Language: Notes Towards a Systematic Investigation
In: Structures of Language: Notes Towards a Systematic Investigation