Fragments of the Sixteenth-Century Nahuatl Census from the Jagiellonian Library: A Lost Manuscript provides a missing chunk of the sixteenth century Marquesado census—one of the earliest known texts in Nahuatl. In the critical edition of this manuscript, Julia Madajczak, Katarzyna Granicka, Szymon Gruda, Monika Jaglarz, and José Luis de Rojas reveal how it traveled across the Atlantic only to be lost during World War II and then rediscovered at the Jagiellonian Library, Poland. When connected to other surviving fragments of the Marquesado census, now held in Mexico and France, the Jagiellonian Library manuscript sheds new light on pre-contact and early colonial Nahua society. The authors use it to discuss the concept of calpolli, family life, and the production of administrative documentation in the early colonial Tepoztlan of today’s Morelos.
Language and Cultural Contact in the Caribbean
Volume Editors: Glenda-Alicia Leung and Miki Loschky
Volume Editors: Terressa A. Benz and Graham Cassano
This volume places the Flint, Michigan, water contamination disaster in the context of a broader crisis of neoliberal governance in the United States. Authors from a range of disciplines (including sociology, criminal justice, anthropology, history, communications, and jurisprudence) examine the failures in Flint, but with an emphasis upon comparison, calling attention to similar trajectories for cities like Detroit and Pontiac, in Michigan, and Stockton, in California. While the studies collected here emphasize policy failures, class conflict, and racial oppression, they also attend to the resistance undertaken by Flint residents, Michiganders, and U.S. activists, as they fought for environmental and social justice.

Contributors include: Terressa A. Benz, Jon Carroll, Graham Cassano, Daniel J. Clark, Katrinell M. Davis, Michael Doan, David Fasenfest, A.E. Garrison, Peter J. Hammer, Ami Harbin, Shea Howell, Jacob Lederman, Raoul S. Lievanos, Benjamin J. Pauli, and Julie Sze.
England’s Early Africa Companies and their Traders, 1618-1672
This book directs its main focus to the Guinea Company and its members, aiming to understand the genealogy of several major changes taking place in the English Atlantic and in the Anglo-Africa trade in the 17th century and beyond. Little focus has been directed at the companies that preceded the Royal African Company, launched in 1672, and through presenting the Guinea Company - the earliest of England’s chartered Africa companies, and its relationship with the influential men who became its members, the book questions the inevitability of the Atlantic reality of the later seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Through its members, the Guinea Company emerged as a purpose-built structure with the ability to weather a volatile trade undergoing fundamental change.
Author: Beth L. Hewett
In A Scholarly Edition of Samuel P. Newman’s A Practical System of Rhetoric, Beth L. Hewett argues that Newman, an American nineteenth-century rhetorician, has been unfairly judged by criteria disconnected from his goals and accomplishments. His exceptionally popular textbook is important for how he engaged received theory, fit practice to the era, struggled with age-old questions of thought and language, and spoke to his readers. He operationalized the concept of taste, giving it functionality for invention, and inflected Belletrism with American illustrations suited to the nascent, uniquely American communicative requirements of a democracy. Hewett’s modern scholarly edition contextualizes this book as the serious work of a scholar-educator, demonstrating its values in the context of nineteenth-century American rhetorical and textbook history.
Views of the Cuban Communist Party on the Collapse of Soviet and Eastern European Socialism
In Cuba Was Different, Even Sandvik Underlid explores the views of Cuban authorities, official press, and Party members as they reflect back on the collapse of Soviet and Eastern European socialism. In so doing, he contributes to a better understanding as to why the Cuban system – often associated with Fidel Castro’s leadership – did not itself collapse. Despite the loss of its most important allies, key ideological referents, and even most of its foreign trade, Cuba did not embrace capitalism.

The author critically examines and analyzes the collapse of the USSR and Eastern Europe as reported in the Cuban Communist Party newspaper Granma, both as they unfolded and subsequently through the lens of additional interviews with individual Party members. This focus on Cuba’s Communist Party provides new perspectives on how these events were seen from Cuba and on the notable resilience of many party members.
Economic Interests and Political Decision Making in the History of Dutch Brazil, 1621–1656
In Lobbying in Company, Joris van den Tol argues that people made a difference in the Dutch West India Company colony in Brazil (1630–1654). Through a combination of petitions, personal relations, and public opinion, individuals were able to exercise influence on the decision-making process regarding Dutch Brazil. His thorough analysis of these different elements offers a new perspective on the Atlantic and the Dutch Republic in the seventeenth century as well as a better understanding of lobbying in the early modern period.
Personality, Persona, and the U.S. President
The turbulent and unpredictable presidency of Donald Trump has intensified public and scholarly attention to the personalities of presidents. Profiles in Power approaches the presidency as a personal affair that is shaped, in part, by the character of the occupants of the Oval Office and their attempts to craft public personas. In ten biographical essays that focus on individual presidents and on one First Lady, the authors in this volume build on a renewed interest in presidential studies that emphasizes individual agency. As such, the book seeks to bring the personal aspect of the presidency back into U.S. political history.