Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 453 items for :

  • Social Sciences x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Chapters/Articles x
Clear All

Abstract

In the context of the covid-19 pandemic, teleworking has largely become a useful model of work for many employees, managers and employers. This new style of working can be easily distinguished from traditional telework habits, especially by its imposed character. For this reason, this paper attempts to develop the term “imposed telework,” which has deeply changed the established habitual routines of employees who have never or rarely ever engaged in telework, in order to test the possibility of quasi-permanent teleworking instead of the full-time office-bound work style. Therefore, a generalization of a quasi-permanent teleworking method would be that it is a new, more environmentally-compatible professional mode; however, are employees ready for such change? This research, comprising 73 participants from France, Italy, and Turkey, clearly showed that it is too soon to generalize such a new professional model, owing to the difficulties that the participants faced, such as isolation, absenteeism, work/life conflicts, etc., even if their productivity increment was recorded.

In: Journal of Labor and Society

Abstract

Latin American labor markets are remarked on for their structural heterogeneity, which, over the years, has been the result of a growing labor surplus. Thus, the digital labor platforms in delivery services that have emerged are breaking into a complex labor landscape, imposing new challenges. We intend to describe what forms the workers’ collective actions take and how these collective actions and their forms are linked with the labor institutions’ settings. We use three case studies with a comparative perspective of both national labor institutions and the history of collective action, particularly in the urban labor context. We collected secondary information from news media and academic bibliographies and primary information through interviews with collectives’ representatives. Our results show how the logic of digital platforms challenges collective action, and how the history of labor institutions might contribute to the rise of new forms of organization.

In: Journal of Labor and Society
Author: Torkil Lauesen

Abstract

This article tells the story of an organization based in Copenhagen, Denmark, which supported the Liberation struggle in the Third World from 1969 until April 1989. It focus on the support to the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (pflp). The story is told in a historical and global context. The text explains the strategy and tactic behind the support-work. It explains how the different forms of solidarity work developed over two decades (for a more detailed account of the history of the group, see ). Finally, the article offers an evaluation of the past and a perspective on the future struggle for a socialist Palestine.

In: Journal of Labor and Society

Abstract

Recently in Latin America, numerous mobilizations of workers against the precariousness of work in delivery platforms have been developed. In this study, we argue that consolidation into strong organizations for defending platform workers’ interests is strongly related to the socio-political and institutional contexts they are involved in. Drawn upon the understanding of solidarity among workers as a phenomenon rooted in the labor process, as well as the relevance of socio-political and institutional context for the organizing processes among precarious workers, this study addresses the cases of self-organization of platforms deliverers in Chile and Peru. Based on ethnographic research, the results show common characteristics of workers’ self-organization, which are related to similar labor processes in delivery platforms. In addition, results shed light on the relevance of the socio-political and institutional context in providing resources for the consolidation of grassroots organizations, especially after platform counter-actions.

In: Journal of Labor and Society
In: Journal of Labor and Society

Abstract

Platform works are swiftly turning into a big, perhaps game-changing force in the labor market. From low-skilled, low-paid services (like passenger transport) to high-skilled, high-paying project-based labor (like developing artificial intelligence algorithms), digital platforms can handle a wide range of tasks. Our paper discusses the platform-based content, working conditions, employment status, and advocacy problems. Terminological and methodological problems are dealt with in-depth in the course of the literature review, together with the ‘gray areas’ of work and employment regulation. To examine some of the complex dynamics of this fast-evolving arena, we focus on the unsuccessful market entry of the digital platform company Uber in Hungary 2016 and the relationship to institutional-regulatory platform-based work standards. Dilemmas about the enforcement of labor law regarding platform-based work are also paid special attention to the study. Employing a digital workforce is a challenge not only for labor law regulation but also for stakeholder advocacy.

In: Journal of Labor and Society

Abstract

It has been five years since the first strikes of Deliveroo workers in London in 2016. Since then, workers have continued to organise. The campaigns have involved five different aspects: first, wildcat strike action; second, networks and internationalisation; third, union organising with the Independent Workers Union of Great Britain (iwgb); fourth, legal campaigning; and fifth, wider leverage campaigns. What is less understood so far is the different strengths and weaknesses of these aspects, and how they have contributed to the build of workers’ self-organisation and power at Deliveroo. This article explores the different aspects and considers the effectiveness of each. It concludes by considering what can be learned from these struggles for the understanding of platform work and trade union organising today.

In: Journal of Labor and Society