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Abstract

One Health seeks the optimal health of people, animals, and the environment through an integrated approach to the treatment and prevention of disease. While cats and other animals can be vectors of zoonotic diseases, the “moral panic” over free-roaming cats should be viewed with great skepticism. We should instead manage our relationship to cats, wildlife, and their environments with an eye to preventative measures that manage risk while respecting the well-being of individual cats and wildlife.

In: Society & Animals

Abstract

Hand in hand with policy developments, educational practices are constantly looking for how teachers can be (better) supported and professionalized in dealing with pupils with specific educational needs in regular education. Supporting and strengthening the competences of teachers in dealing with diverse needs is closely related to the question of connective collaboration within inclusive learning environments. But when is collaboration connective?

In this ethnographic study, we set out using research material that succeeds in giving form and substance to connective collaboration within Alex’s inclusion process. By means of a diffractive analysis, four helpful and necessary developments emerge: four doing words that emphasize a process that is never complete. ‘Purposefully encountering’, ‘exchanging’, ‘negotiating’ and ‘affirming’ encourage a continuous development towards connection in the interaction between Alex, his individually adapted curriculum (iac), the classroom environment, his family and all education and welfare actors involved.

Open Access
In: Journal of Disability Studies in Education
Authors: Yibo Fan and Stacy Lindshield

Abstract

This paper reports the social-cultural findings from building an artificial canopy bridge for mantled howler monkeys (Alouatta palliata) and other arboreal mammals in Puerto Viejo, Costa Rica. We analyzed participatory observation results from participatory designing and building, and camera trap data from monitoring the bridge. This article also discusses how local perceptions towards monkeys, regional developments, and bridge functions inform primate conservation in that region. It examines a broader primate conservation strategy that addresses entangled values and bridge design in a human-centered, peri-urban, and coastal evergreen forest. We found that artificial canopy bridge design is a complex problem related to humans and targeted species. Connecting habitat with artificial canopy bridges in this context is part of a more significant urban planning problem. Bridge material and design are related to animal usage and existing infrastructure and can shape public views that build or jeopardize public trust.

In: Folia Primatologica

Abstract

This article outlines the emergence and development of human-animal studies in Israel (HASI). It sketches the changes the field has undergone and its accomplishments to date, identifying key challenges and opportunities. The article highlights two major shifts that HASI has undergone throughout the years: the first, an initial focus on animal-assisted therapy (AAT) that eventually gave way to a multidisciplinary approach to human-animal relations; and the second, a transition from a humanistic perspective to growing critical involvement in HAS and partial post-humanistic epistemology. The past and current institutional state of human-animal studies in Israel is traced, characterized by ongoing infrastructure changes, alongside a growing group of scholars that aim to develop the field. We conclude with a contemplation of future directions and prospects for HASI.

In: Society & Animals

Abstract

Esther is unique in the degree to which its early translations differ from one another. Although this poses difficulties for traditional text critical goals, it also provides unique opportunities for the study of the literature and society of the Second Temple Period. Because the versions differ so much, each ‘translation’ represents an essentially original retelling of the same story. These versions developed over the course of the Second Temple period, and so offer a series of perspectives on the same story, from different times and places. One example of this is how these versions treat Esth 8:17. In Masoretic Esth 8:17, the inhabitants of the empire ‘Judaise’ (‮מתיהדים‬‎). However, as the text was received in translation throughout the second temple period, multiple different views arose among the different versions as to what the nature of this event was. The different ways that the highly divergent versions of Esther handle this part of the narrative reflect transformations in Jewish–gentile relationships throughout this period.

In: Textus
Author: Denis Bertet

Abstract

Tikuna (isolate, western Amazonia) features a system of five nominal agreement classes: Feminine, Masculine, Neuter, Salientive, and Non-Salientive. Like in well-known Indo-European gender languages, the targets of class agreement (nominal modifiers and pronominal morphemes, essentially) obligatorily agree in class with the participant they relate to. Tikuna, however, usually offers several options of class assignment to given participants in discourse, and even allows participants to change class over the course of a single discourse performance. A participant designated by means of the noun kŏwǘ ‘deer’ may thus be assigned to any class except Neuter, suggesting that lexical properties of nouns cannot fully account for class assignment. I argue that the primary factor underlying class assignment (and reassignment) in Tikuna are the inherent semantic and pragmatic values of each class. Lexical properties and, occasionally, the class assignment of other participants in the immediate context, do come into play, but as secondary factors. Flexibility and secondary reliance on lexical information are the most visibly divergent characteristics of class assignment in Tikuna relative to typical Indo-European gender systems.

In: Faits de Langues