Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 24,323 items for :

  • Search level: Chapters/Articles x
Clear All

Abstract

This article highlights the key differences between two approaches to Buddhism adopted worldwide, ‘Buddhism(s) for this World’ and ‘Engaged Buddhism.’ Although these two terms seem interchangeable, the article presents some differences arising from specific historical circumstances. While the former originated in a reform movement within Chinese Buddhism at the beginning of the twentieth century, the second one, which emerged later, encompasses a much wider variety of Buddhist movements. While ‘Buddhism(s) for this world’ started as a reformist movement, it has become in some cases the vehicle of nationalism. Meanwhile, ‘Engaged Buddhism,’ a somewhat more diverse movement indirectly inspired by his predecessor, has embraced many social justice causes but struggles to institutionalize. The article presents the geopolitical context of international rivalry in which these two trends seek to affirm their respective perspectives.

Open Access
In: Journal of Social Innovation and Knowledge

Abstract

Previous studies suggested that long-term Chinese residents living in Japan, instead of identifying as Japanese or Chinese, may have a “superordinate orientation” not characterized by nationality. This study developed a scale to measure cultural awareness of border crossers and evaluated its reliability and validity. To confirm the scale’s reliability, we conducted two online surveys of adult Chinese who had lived in Japan for at least three years at the time of the survey. A 45-item scale was created based on the interview results. The same items were used in both surveys. An exploratory factor analysis (maximum likelihood method, promax rotation) was performed on the valid responses to the first survey. A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted on the valid responses to the second survey. The results showed that the Cultural Awareness Scale for Border Crossers has acceptable reliability and validity.

Open Access
In: Journal of Social Innovation and Knowledge

Abstract

Dr. Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar, renowned as the chief architect of the Indian Constitution and a tireless advocate for social justice, has left an enduring impact on India’s socio-political landscape. This research essay delves into the multifaceted spirit of Ambedkar, emphasizing his profound engagement with Buddhism and the emergence of Neo-Buddhism as a potent catalyst for social transformation. His conversion to Buddhism symbolized a resolute renunciation of the entrenched caste hierarchy, heralding an embrace of the Buddha’s teachings that exalted the fundamental interconnectedness of all sentient beings. This underlines his steadfast belief in Buddhism as an antidote to the deeply ingrained caste system, marking his unwavering dedication to bestow a renewed spiritual identity upon the marginalized. Ambedkar’s profound reinterpretation of Buddhist philosophy, with a focus on its social dimensions and ethical code, exemplifies his spirit of adapting Buddhism to the contemporary struggles of the oppressed.

Open Access
In: Journal of Social Innovation and Knowledge

Abstract

This data paper presents Arkas 2.0, a national research database and research infrastructure containing data on all archaeological sites and monuments in Slovenia. The new database is a hybrid cloud microservice built on low-code platforms (Caspio and ArcGIS Experience builder) and augmented by generative ai (ChatGPT-3.5). The data paper describes the Arkas 2.0 dataset and how it fits into the research context by discussing the challenges archaeologists face in setting up and curating datasets and the associated digital infrastructure. In response to these challenges, the data paper highlights the benefits of low-code platforms and ai-augmented code for archaeological research. It also describes the Arkas 2.0 development workflow, its new data structure, and its archiving process. The data paper concludes by suggesting that the use of low-code platforms combined with generative ai can democratise access to cutting-edge digital research infrastructure, bringing positive disruption to archaeology and the humanities.

Open Access
In: Research Data Journal for the Humanities and Social Sciences
In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
Author:

Abstract

This essay examines the medieval presentation of emotions and selfhood through the lens of romantic love in Marie de France’s Chevrefoil and Thomas of Britain’s Tristran, as well as their Middle High German and Old Norse translations. The focus is on the alteration or destruction of a discrete self through the experience of romantic love. By drawing on both modern scientific understandings and medieval conceptualisations of love, the essay explores how an altered sense of self is central to experiencing and portraying the emotion. However, the exact degree and nature of this alteration varies in the different texts presented here, ranging from complete fusion in Gottfried von Strassburg’s Tristan to mutually supportive entwining in the Old Norse Geitarlauf and Tristrams saga ok Ísöndar.

Open Access
In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
Author:

Abstract

Jambudvīpa is embedded with and surrounded by perennial water sources from the Great Himalayan hills. The visual remains and literary pieces of evidence show that people in the hoary past were conscious of water sources from the great hills. The Buddha has advised the corporeal use of water in many suttas. Buddhism has vast philosophical dimensions for five elements (water is one of them. It played an essential role in forming the cosmological and corporeal views of hills and water sources. Because of the rising population, monopolization, and monetization of water, a shortage of water is felt in some regions. The paper will examine the Buddhist view on the ecological dimensions of water issues and its engaged traditions.

Open Access
In: Journal of Social Innovation and Knowledge