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Volume Editor: Marzena Żakowska
The book offers a comprehensive overview of social security in the Balkan states. Social security is presented from a broad perspective as a mechanism that addresses human needs, provides protection against social risks, reduces social tensions and secures peace. Various sectors of social policy, pension systems, health care systems, disability insurance, labor policy as well as social risks, such as poverty and unemployment have been analyzed from historical, economic, political, sociological and security perspective. The book also offers recommendations for improving the level of social security in the region.

Contributors are: Dritero Arifi, Ngadhnjim Brovina, Pëllumb Çollaku, Dorota Domalewska, Besnik Fetahu, Remzije Istrefi, Maja Jandrić, Gordana Matković, Ruzhdi Morina, Artan Mustafa, Katarina Stanić, and Marzena Żakowska.
Volume Editors: Jana Schultz and James Wilberding
Sosipatra, Hypatia, Macrina: some of the most famous female philosophers of antiquity were connected to Neoplatonism. But what does it mean to be a woman philosopher in late antiquity? How is the inclusive nature of the Neoplatonic schools connected to their ethical, political, and metaphysical ideas? What role does the religious dimension of late Neoplatonism and the role of women as priestesses play in understanding Neoplatonic women philosophers?
This book offers thirteen essays that examine women and the female in Neoplatonism from a variety of perspectives, paying particular attention to the interactions between the metaphysics, psychology, and ethics.
The Eastern Himalaya holds perhaps the highest levels of ethnolinguistic diversity in all Eurasia, with over 300 languages spoken by as many distinct cultural groups. What factors can explain such diversity? How did it evolve, and what can its analysis teach us about the prehistory of its wider region?
This pioneering interdisciplinary volume brings together a diverse group of linguists and anthropologists, all of whom seek to reconstruct aspects of Eastern Himalayan ethnolinguistic prehistory from an empirical standpoint, on the basis of primary fieldwork-derived data from a diverse range of Himalayan Indigenous languages and cultural practices.
Contributors are: David Bradley, Scott DeLancey, Toni Huber, Gwendolyn Hyslop, Linda Konnerth, Ismael Lieberherr, Yankee Modi, Stephen Morey, Mark W. Post, Uta Reinöhl, Alban Stockhausen, Amos Teo, and Marion Wettstein .
Karl Rahner and the Contemporary Exploration for Meaning
In Theology, Empowerment, and Prison Ministry Meins G.S. Coetsier offers a new scholarly account of Karl Rahner’s theological anthropology and the prison pastorate with a contemporary expansion for meaning, seeking an antidote to the suffering and isolation of those incarcerated with a “theology of empowerment.” Drawing on prison ministry theorists and practitioners, and on the experiences of Viktor Frankl, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and Etty Hillesum, the book argues that Rahner’s views on prison ministry are significant and encouraging but limited regarding the needs and demands of 21st-century prison ministry. In a convincing, perceptive, and groundbreaking study, Coetsier goes beyond Rahner with ecumenical and interreligious perspectives, reminding us all of our human dignity, of meaning and transformation, of our liberation, creativity, hope and community.
The present volume sets Swahili religious tracts available in Kenya and Tanzania in their context. The book starts with an overview of tracts in Swahili from the 19th century to the present day, an examination of Swahili as a religious language, and an introduction to Swahili versions of the Bible and Qurʾān. Chesworth then introduces the range of tracts currently available, examining eight in detail. In particular he considers how they present scripture in order to promote their own faith, Islam or Christianity, whilst denigrating the ‘other’. Finally, the volume discusses the impact from modern media on these tracts.
Series Editors: Tyrus Miller and Erik M. Bachmann
The image of György Lukács’s work, especially in the English-speaking world, has been limited by the absence of translations of some of the most significant writing. The Lukács Library seeks to fill out the picture of Lukács’s massively productive and diverse writing and to correct the reception of Lukács through the nearly exclusive emphasis of Western Marxism and the New Left on Lukács’s early work. In particular, the Lukács Library translations will offer a much richer view of Lukács’s long-evolving engagement with the changing contexts of modern European culture over the eight decades of his life, with the shifts in the socialist and communist movement, and with the dominant and emerging philosophical paradigms of the twentieth century. The Lukács Library’s major expansion of the corpus of English-language translations of Lukács’s writings will especially train new attention on writings that span Lukács’s advocacy of an anti-fascist cultural front policy, a new democratic popular front following the fall of fascism, and an anti-Stalinist socialist democracy in a global environment of coexistence following the 20th Congress in 1956 in which Khrushschev initiated the post-Stalin thaw. In addition, it will provide new material for understanding the genesis of the major, influential, and much-discussed works that have previously appeared in English translations.
Series Editor: Laurence Roulleau-Berger
Reflection in the social sciences is linked to the development of the Western society which saw its birth. The social sciences and humanities have developed very considerably in the last decades in different Asian countries, where both theoretical approaches and theoretical methodologies have been constantly changing. As a result of the circulation and globalisation of knowledge, new centres and new peripheral areas have been formed and new hierarchies have quietly emerged, giving rise in turn to new competitive environments in which innovative knowledge is being produced. The centres in which knowledge in the social sciences and humanities is produced have moved towards Asia. We are entering a new phase of global intellectual life after Western hegemony. The aim of this series is to produce a post-Western space in which knowledge is produced that is both specific and shared and in which theories and methodologies are gathered together on the basis of very different histories and traditions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Athina Dimitriou.

Submissions of an interdisciplinary nature are strongly encouraged.
Studies in Central European Histories is a peer-reviewed book series that presents original work and translations of the histories of the German-speaking and closely related peoples of Central Europe between the Middle Ages and the present. It aims to bring forward new and neglected perspectives on important subjects and issues in the histories of these peoples. The series is designed for advanced students and scholars of German and European history in the early modern and modern periods.

General Editors: David M. Luebke and Celia Applegate.

Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the Brill Open webpage.

The series published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
The Lives of Modern Japanese Silk Mill Workers in Their Own Words
Author: Sandra Schaal
At a time when concern with the exploitation of young women in the assembly plants of developing countries is still a major social issue for gender and development specialists, Discovering Women's Voices. The Lives of Modern Japanese Silk Mill Workers in Their Own Words, offers a vivid account of the lives of women who formed modern Japan’s ‘reserve army’ for textile mills.

By analyzing works songs and oral testimonies of former silk-reeling operatives about their lives in the factory and in their native countryside, it challenges the long-standing assumption describing their history as merely exploitative, convincingly showing that factory life could appear as a window of opportunity or at least a lesser evil to workers born in rural underprivileged families.
This quantitative study of Piotrków Trybunalski traces the evolution of the population in the typical early modern semi-agrarian town in which the majority of activity was concentrated in the Jewish suburbs into a provincial capital in Congress Poland. Through the use of longitudinal aggregations and family reconstruction it explores fertility, mortality, and marriage patterns from the early nineteenth century, when civil records were introduced, until the Holocaust, revealing key differences as well as striking similarities between local Jews and non-Jews. The example of Piotrków set in a broader European context highlights variations in the pre-transitional demography of Ashkenazi Jewry and lack of universal model describing the “traditional” or “eastern European” Jewish family.