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Series:

Naomi S.S. Jacobs

In Delicious Prose: Reading the Tale of Tobit with Food and Drink, Naomi S.S. Jacobs explores how the numerous references to food, drink, and their consumption within The Book of Tobit help tell its story, promote righteous deeds and encourage resistance against a hostile dominant culture. Jacobs’ commentary includes up-to-date analyses of issues of translation, text-criticism, source criticism, redaction criticism, and issues of class and gender. Jacobs situates Tobit within a wide range of ancient writings sacred to Jews and Christians as well as writings and customs from the Ancient Near East, Ugarit, Greece, Rome, including a treasure trove of information about ancient foodways and medicine.

Sibyls, Scriptures, and Scrolls

John Collins at Seventy

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Edited by Joel Baden, Hindy Najman and Eibert J.C. Tigchelaar

This volume, a tribute to John J. Collins by his friends, colleagues, and students, includes essays on the wide range of interests that have occupied John Collins’s distinguished career. Topics range from the ancient Near East and the Hebrew Bible to the Dead Sea Scrolls and Second Temple Judaism and beyond into early Christianity and rabbinic Judaism. The contributions deal with issues of text and interpretation, history and historiography, philology and archaeology, and more. The breadth of the volume is matched only by the breadth of John Collins’s own work.

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Edited by Armin Lange and Emanuel Tov

The Textual History of the Bible (THB) brings together for the first time all available information regarding the manuscripts, textual history and character of each book of the Hebrew Bible and its translations as well as the deuterocanonical scriptures. In addition, THB covers the history of research, the editorial history of the Hebrew Bible, as well as other aspects of text-critical research and its subsidiary fields, such as papyrology, codicology, and the related discipline of linguistics. The THB will consist of 4 volumes.

Volume 1B provides detailed entries on the different primary translations (Greek, Aramaic, Syriac, Latin) and uniquely the secondary translations as well (Latin, Coptic, Ethiopic, Syriac, Armenian, Georgian, Christian Palestinian Aramaic, Old Slavonic, and Arabic) most of which were sourced from the Greek.

The THB 1 print volumes will comprise a total of 353 articles, approximately 2,000 pages, presented in three volumes. For each textual version 15 area editors, who are highly recognized specialists in their field, have invited contributions from 120 authors.

See the Table of Contents here.

The Textual History of the Bible is also available online.

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Edited by Claire Clivaz, Paul Dilley and David Hamidović

The volume presents a selection of research projects in Digital Humanities applied to the “Biblical Studies” in the widest sense and context, including Early Jewish and Christian studies, hence the title “Ancient Worlds”. Taken as a whole, the volume explores the emergent Digital Culture at the beginning of the 21st century. It also offers many examples which attest to a change of paradigm in the textual scholarship of “Ancient Worlds”: categories are reshaped; textuality is (re-) investigated according to its relationships with orality and visualization; methods, approaches and practices are no longer a fixed conglomeration but are mobilized according to their contexts and newly available digital tools.

Series:

Edited by Armin Lange and Emanuel Tov

The Textual History of the Bible (THB) brings together for the first time all available information regarding the manuscripts, textual history and character of each book of the Hebrew Bible and its translations as well as the deuterocanonical scriptures. In addition, THB covers the history of research, the editorial history of the Hebrew Bible, as well as other aspects of text-critical research and its subsidiary fields, such as papyrology, codicology, and the related discipline of linguistics. The THB will consist of 4 volumes.

Volumes 1A, 1B and 1C: The Hebrew Bible
Volume 1A consists of a series of overview articles and can already be considered as the first standalone introduction to the texts of the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament.

The THB 1 print volumes will comprise a total of 353 articles, approximately 2,000 pages, presented in three volumes. For each textual version 15 area editors, who are highly recognized specialists in their field, have invited contributions from 120 authors.

See the Table of Contents here.

The Textual History of the Bible is also available online.

Mapping Galilee in Josephus, Luke, and John

Critical Geography and the Construction of an Ancient Space

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John Vonder Bruegge

The study of 1st century CE Galilee has become an important subfield within the broader disciplines of Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity. In Mapping Galilee, John M. Vonder Bruegge examines how Galilee is portrayed, both in ancient writings and current scholarship, as a variously mapped space using insights from critical geography as an evaluative lens. Conventional approaches to Galilee treat it as a static backdrop for a deliberate and dynamic historical drama. By reasserting geography as a creative process rather than a passive description, Vonder Bruegge also reasserts ancient Galilee as an interpreted space—a series of conceptualized "maps"—laden with meaning, significance, and purpose for each individual author.

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André Villeneuve

In Nuptial Symbolism in Second Temple Writings, the New Testament and Rabbinic Literature, André Villeneuve examines the ancient Jewish concept of the covenant between God and Israel, portrayed as a marriage dynamically moving through salvation history. This nuptial covenant was established in Eden but damaged by sin; it was restored at the Sinai theophany, perpetuated in the Temple liturgy, and expected to reach its final consummation at the end of days.

The authors of the New Testament adopted the same key moments of salvation history to describe the spousal relationship between Christ and the Church. In their typological treatment of these motifs, they established an exegetical framework that would anticipate the four senses of Scripture later adopted by patristic and medieval commentators.

Edited by Emanuel Tov

The Dead Sea Scrolls represents perhaps the most significant historical manuscript discovery in recent history. Brill’s Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Non-Biblical Texts offers a unique opportunity to study state of the art photographs of these ancient scripts, and understand their meaning using the translations of text and interpretations for missing fragments.

The Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Non-Biblical Texts provides users with a comprehensive tool for the study of the non-biblical texts from the Judean Desert (the “Dead Sea Scrolls”). It contains high resolution images of the Non-Biblical Dead Sea Scroll fragments and all the texts, in the original languages and in translation. It enables content searching using a sophisticated inventory, and examining finer details of the original texts through search options and zoom possibilities for the images. Never before has such comprehensive information been available in one place.

The complete collection consists of the Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Non-Biblical Texts and the Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Biblical Texts. Used side by side, these databases offer the user access to all the Dead Sea Scrolls texts.

This online product is based on The Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library CD-ROM, published by Brill and Brigham Young University, 1999.

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Edited by Sidnie White Crawford and Cecilia Wassen

The Dead Sea Scrolls at Qumran and the Concept of a Library presents twelve articles by renowned experts in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Qumran studies. These articles explore from various angles the question of whether or not the collection of manuscripts found in the eleven caves in the vicinity of Khirbet Qumran can be characterized as a “library,” and, if so, what the relation of that library is to the ruins of Qumran and the group of Jews that inhabited them. The essays fall into the following categories: the collection as a whole, subcollections within the overall corpus, and the implications of identifying the Qumran collection as a library.

Tetragrammaton: Western Christians and the Hebrew Name of God

From the Beginnings to the Seventeenth Century

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Robert J. Wilkinson

The Christian Reception of the Hebrew name of God has not previously been described in such detail and over such an extended period. This work places that varied reception within the context of early Jewish and Christian texts; Patristic Studies; Jewish-Christian relationships; Mediaeval thought; the Renaissance and Reformation; the History of Printing; and the development of Christian Hebraism.
The contribution of notions of the Tetragrammaton to orthodox doctrines and debates is exposed, as is the contribution its study made to non-orthodox imaginative constructs and theologies. Gnostic, Kabbalistic, Hermetic and magical texts are given equally detailed consideration.
There emerge from this sustained and detailed examination several recurring themes concerning the difficulty of naming God, his being and his providence.