Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • Philosophy, Theology & Science x
  • Jewish Studies x
  • Religious Studies x
Clear All Modify Search

Rabbinic Discourse as a System of Knowledge

"The Study of Torah is Equal to them All"

Series:

Hannah Hashkes

In Rabbinic Discourse as a System of Knowledge Hannah Hashkes employs contemporary philosophy in describing rabbinic reasoning as a rational response to experience. Hashkes combines insights from the philosophy of Quine and Davidson with the semiotics of Peirce to construe knowledge as systematic reasoning occurring within a community of inquiry. Her reading of the works of Emmanuel Levinas and Jean-Luc Marion allows her to create a philosophical bridge between a discourse of God and a discourse of reason. This synthesis of pragmatism, hermeneutics and theology provides Hashkes with a sophisticated tool to understand Rabbinic Judaism. It also makes this study both unique and pathbreaking in contemporary Jewish philosophy and Rabbinic thought.

Abraham Bar Hiyya on Time, History, Exile and Redemption

An Analysis of Megillat ha-Megalleh

Series:

Hannu Töyrylä

An analysis of Megillat ha-Megalleh by Abraham Bar Hiyya (12th c.) as a complete text in its historical and cultural context, showing that the work - written at a time when Jews increasingly came under Christian influence and dominance – presents a coherent argument for the continuing validity of the Jewish hope for redemption. In his argument, Bar Hiyya presents a view of history, the course of which was planted by God in creation, which runs inevitably towards the future redemption of the Jews. Bar Hiyya uses philosophical, scientific, biblical and astrological material to support his argument, and several times makes use of originally Christian ideas, which he inverts to suit his argument.

Series:

Edited by Wim Hofstee and A. van der Kooij

The volume Religion beyond its Private Role in Modern Society aims at contributing to the debate on the distinction between public and private spheres with regard to the role of religion in modern societies. This issue which is inherent to many conceptions regarding social order, modernity, freedom of conscience, and the changing role and function of religion is discussed not only from a social scientific but also from a historical and philosophical point of view. The articles dwell on several aspects of the role of religion in different societies in modern times, and the overall theme is explored from the perspective of various religious traditions and groups, both institutional and non-institutional. It turns out that the distinction made is difficult to maintain.

Francis Mercury van Helmont's Sketch of Christian Kabbalism

Translated and Edited by Sheila A. Spector

Series:

Edited by Sheila Spector

Sheila A. Spector’s translation of the Sketch of Christian Kabbalism, by Francis Mercury van Helmont (1614-98), is the first English version of the foundational seventeenth-century treatise appended to Knorr von Rosenroth’s compendium, the Kabbala Denudata. After a survey of the historical context in general, Jewish and Christian Kabbalah in particular, and a brief biography of van Helmont, Spector’s introduction explains how the author adapted the original Jewish myth for Christian purposes. The bilingual text contains a facsimile of the original Latin on one side, facing the English translation on the other, with Van Helmont’s footnotes supplemented by the translator’s endnotes. The edition is essential for scholars, though of interest to the general reader as well.
The idea and practice of public theology has recently emerged as a distinct field of scholarship that proactively engages theology with contemporary public issues. The global project of public theology has expanded the western idea of three audiences - the church, the academy and the public domain – and their inter-relationship to multiple publics. It has now become a global discipline that intersects with the emergence of a world Christianity. Now, in the Anthropocene, those three audiences should be viewed in the light of a concern for the whole of creation, including those other creatures with whom we share life and upon whom we depend.
A public theology seeks to be in creative dialogue with different academic disciplines, including politics, economics, law and security studies, cultural studies, religion, spirituality, the natural science and the social sciences and the study of globalization. It is sensitive to the emergence of new publics that arise out of theology’s engagement with other new disciplines – like astrobiology – which redefines understandings of what is space and what is public. It is also a discipline that welcomes the expertise of practitioners reflecting on public policy.

The International Journal of Public Theology, affiliated with the Global Network for Public Theology, is a platform for original inter/transdisciplinary research in this field. Manuscripts submitted for publication must exhibit clear and sustained engagement between theology, broadly construed, and a matter or matters of public significance.
All articles undergo rigorous peer review, based on initial editor screening and blind refereeing by two anonymous referees.

Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help.
NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in the International Journal of Public Theology can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

Review of Rabbinic Judaism

Ancient, Medieval, and Modern (Formerly: The Annual of Rabbinic Judaism)

Editor-in-Chief Alan Avery-Peck

The Review of Rabbinic Judaism, the first and only journal to focus upon Rabbinic Judaism in particular, will publish principal articles, essays on method and criticism, systematic debates ( Auseinandersetzungen), occasional notes, long book reviews, reviews of issues of scholarly journals, assessments of textbooks and instructional materials, and other media of academic discourse, scholarly and educational alike.
The Review of Rabbinic Judaism fills the gap in the study of Judaism, which is left by the prevailing division of Rabbinic Judaism among the standard historical periods (ancient, medieval, modern) that in fact do not apply; and by the common treatment of the Judaism in bits and pieces (philosophy, mysticism, law homiletics, institutional history, for example). No journal in "Jewish studies" focuses upon the study of religion, let alone upon the single most important Judaism of all time.

Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help.
NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in the Review of Rabbinic Judaism can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.