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Volume Editor: Michiel Meeusen
This volume provides a set of in-depth case studies about the role of questions and answers (Q&A) in ancient Greek medical writing from its Hippocratic beginnings up to, and including, Late Antiquity. The use of Q&A formulas is widely attested in ancient Greek medical texts, casting an intriguing light on its relevance for the medical art at large, and for ancient medical practice, education, and research in specific (diagnostics, didactics, dialectics). The book aims to break new grounds by exploring, for the first time, the wide complexity of this phenomenon while introducing a coherent approach. In so doing, it not only covers highly specialized medical treatises but also non-canonical authors and texts, including anonymous papyrus fragments and collections of problems.
Author: Moshe Sharon
Aramaic, South Arabian, Coptic, Arabic and Judeo-Arabic Documents
The renaissance of Arabic Papyrology has become obvious by the founding of the International Society for Arabic Papyrology (ISAP) at the Cairo conference (2002), and by its subsequent conferences in Granada (2004), Alexandria (2006), Vienna (2009), Tunis/Carthage (2012), Munich (2014), and Berlin (2018). This volume collects papers given at the Munich conference, including editions of previously unpublished Coptic, Arabic and Judeo-Arabic documents, as well as historical studies based on documentary evidence from Achaemenid Bactria, Ancient South-Arabia, and Early Islamic, Fāṭimid and Mamlūk Egypt.

Contributors: Anne Boud'hors; Ursula Bsees; Peter T. Daniels; Maher A. Eissa; Andreas Kaplony; W. Matt Malczycki; Craig Perry; Daniel Potthast; Peter Stein; Naïm Vanthieghem; Oded Zinger 
Papers in Memory of Sara B. Aleshire from the Second North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy
In Greek Epigraphy and Religion Emily Mackil and Nikolaos Papazarkadas bring together a series of papers first presented at a special session of the Second North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy (Berkeley 2016). That session was dedicated to the memory of Sara B. Aleshire, one of the leading Greek epigraphists of the twentieth century. The volume at hand includes a combination of previously unpublished inscriptions, overlooked epigraphical documents, and well known inscribed texts that are reexamined with fresh eyes and approaches. The relevant documents cover a wide geographical range, including Athens and Attica, the Peloponnese, Epirus, Thessaly, the Aegean islands, and Egypt. This collection ultimately explores the insights provided by epigraphical texts into the religious beliefs and practices of the ancient Greeks, but also revisits critically some entrenched doctrines in the field of Greek religion.
Author: Gaëlle Tallet
Que viennent faire les rayons solaires du dieu grec Hélios sur le front d’un dieu crocodile égyptien ? Cette question est au point de départ d’une enquête au cœur de la plasticité du système polythéiste de l’Égypte gréco-romaine. Parcourant le labyrinthe des diverses communautés et croyances grecques et égyptiennes, Gaëlle Tallet utilise le fil d’Ariane de la production des images religieuses, réponses à de nouveaux besoins et de nouvelles perceptions du divin, et ouvre les portes des ateliers où elles ont été conçues, commandées et façonnées. La Splendeur des dieux propose une réévaluation du rôle des clergés et des artistes indigènes dans l’élaboration d’un hellénisme proprement égyptien, qui leur a permis de promouvoir et préserver des traditions millénaires.

Why are the rays of the Greek god Helios on the forehead of a crocodile-headed Egyptian deity? Navigating the maze of Greek and Egyptian communities and creeds, Gaëlle Tallet investigates the plasticity of material culture in the polytheistic context of Graeco-Roman Egypt. Using the Ariadne’s thread of the manufacturing of new images, suitable to new needs and new understandings of the divine, La Splendeur des dieux opens the doors of the workshops where these images were designed, ordered and crafted. Tallet offers a full re-appraisal of the cultural balance of powers in Graeco-Roman Egypt, depicting the indigenous clergies and artists as integratedactors of an Egyptian Hellenicity that helped promote and preserve their millenaries-old traditions.
Volume Editors: Nicole Belayche and Francesco Massa
Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity aims to fill a gap in the study of mystery cults in Graeco-Roman Antiquity by focusing on images for investigating their ritual praxis. Nicole Belayche and Francesco Massa have gathered experts on visual language in order to illuminate cultic rituals renowned for both their “mysteries” and their images. This book tackles three interrelated questions. Focusing on the cult of Dionysus, it analyses whether, and how, images are used to depict mystery cults. The relationship between historiography and images of mystery cults is considered with a focus on the Mithraic and Isiac cults. Finally, turning to the cults of Dionysus and the Mother of the Gods, this work shows how depictions of specific cultic objects succeed in expressing mystery cults.
Der Kaiser war der Bevölkerung im Römischen Reich auf vielfältige Weise präsent, durch Statuen auf öffentlichen Plätzen, sein Bildnis auf Münzen oder seinen Namen in Inschriften. Dabei waren seine Untertanen nicht nur Rezipienten kaiserlicher Selbstdarstellung, sondern beteiligten sich auch aktiv an der Ausgestaltung der kaiserlichen Repräsentation mit ihren eigenen Vorstellungen und Erwartungen. Dieses Thema wird in Dialogangebote. Die Anrede des Kaisers jenseits der offiziellen Titulatur erstmals am Beispiel der sog. inoffiziellen Titulaturen auf breiter Quellenbasis untersucht. Dabei werden diese ehrenden Epitheta in ihrer diachronen Entwicklung von Augustus bis Severus Alexander (27 v. Chr. – 235 n. Chr.) und ihren thematischen, medialen, funktionalen und sozialen Kontexten analysiert. Die Untersuchung arbeitet die wichtige Rolle der Untertanen für die Herrscherrepräsentation heraus und bietet neue Einblicke in die Bedeutung dieses Phänomens für die reziproke Kommunikation zwischen Kaiser und Untertanen.

The people of the Roman Empire encountered the emperor in many different ways, such as through statues in public places, his portrait on coins or his name in inscriptions. In these encounters, his subjects were not merely recipients of imperial self-expression, but also expressed their own ideas and expectations. Dialogangebote. Die Anrede des Kaisers jenseits der offiziellen Titulatur is the first study of this dynamic to make use of the rich Latin and Greek source material for the so-called unofficial titulature. These honorific epithets are analysed in their diachronic development from Augustus to Severus Alexander (27 BCE – 235 CE) and discussed in their thematic, media, functional and social contexts. The study fleshes out the important role played by the subjects in the representation of rulers and offers new insights into the importance of this phenomenon for the reciprocal communication between emperors and subjects.
Epistolary Literature, Circulation, and The Gospels for All Christians
Author: David Smith
In The Epistles for All Christians, David Smith argues that epistolary literature offers analogous evidence of circulation to the Gospels. Since Richard Bauckham’s edited volume The Gospels for All Christians was published in 1998, debate over the validity of the contributors’ claims that the Gospels were written for “all Christians” has revolved around interpretation. Smith brings circulation to bear on the conversation.
Studying ancient media practices of publication and circulation and using social network theory, Smith makes a compelling case that if the evangelists did not expect their texts to circulate they would be atypical.
In The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus Thomas R. Henderson provides a new history of the Athenian ephebeia, a system of military, athletic, and moral instruction for new Athenian citizens. Characterized as a system of hoplite training with roots in ancient initiation rituals, the institution appears here as a later Lykourgan creation with the aim of reinvigorating Athenian civic culture. This book also presents a re-evaluation of the Hellenistic phase of the ephebeia, which has been commonly regarded as an institution in decline. Utilizing new epigraphic material, the author demonstrates that, in addition to rigorous military training, the ephebeia remained an important institution and played a vital and vibrant part of Athenian civic life.
Author: Sara Saba
The diplomatic tool known as isopolity is a testament to Greek ingenuity and is attested all over the Mediterranean from the 4th to 1st century B.C., mainly epigraphically. “Isopoliteia” was a popular way to establish new relashionships, reinforce old ones or to regulate difficult situations among communities in the Hellenistic Period. This book offers close scrutiny of potential citizenship between communities as well as a fresh examination of new evidence which has emerged since the publication of the only monograph written on the topic by Wilfried Gawantka in 1975. The book brings together all the evidence for isopolity in the Hellenistic world and demonstrates that communities used this diplomatic tool across different kinds of agreements and through a range of different ways.