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The EU Party Democracy and the Challenge of National Populism
The volume aims to provide consolidated analyses of the 2019 European elections and explanations about the future of the European party system, in a context in which the EU has to face many challenges, including the erosion of electoral support for mainstream parties and the increasing success of populist parties. Its structure is designed to combine the overall view on the role of elections in shaping the future European project with relevant case studies.

The book gives the reader a perspective not only on the results of the European Parliament elections as such, but also on how these results are related to national trends which pre-exists and what kind of collateral effects on the quality of democracy they could have.

Contributors include: Jan Bíba, Sorin Bocancea, Dóra Bókay, Radu Carp, József Dúró, Tomáš Dvořák, Alexandra Alina Iancu, Ruxandra Ivan, Petra Jankovská, Małgorzata Madej, Cristina Matiuța, Sergiu Mișcoiu, Valentin Naumescu, Gianluca Piccolino, Leonardo Puleo, Alexandru Radu, Mihai Sebe, Sorina Soare, Tobias Spöri, Jeremias Stadlmair, Martin Štefek, Piotr Sula, and Jaroslav Ušiak.
In Biomedical Hegemony and Democracy in South Africa Ngambouk Vitalis Pemunta and Tabi Chama-James Tabenyang unpack the contentious South African government’s post-apartheid policy framework of the ‘‘return to tradition policy’’. The conjuncture between deep sociopolitical crises, witchcraft, the ravaging HIV/AIDS pandemic and the government’s initial reluctance to adopt antiretroviral therapy turned away desperate HIV/AIDS patients to traditional healers.

Drawing on historical sources, policy documents and ethnographic interviews, Pemunta and Tabenyang convincingly demonstrate that despite biomedical hegemony, patients and members of their therapy seeking group often shuttle between modern and traditional medicine thereby making both systems of healthcare complementary rather than alternatives. They draw the attention of policy-makers to the need to be aware of ‘‘subaltern health narratives’’ in designing health policy.
This reference book provides the reader with an exhaustive array of epistemological, theoretical, and empirical explorations related to the field of cosmopolitanism studies. It considers the cosmopolitan perspective rather as a relevant approach to the understanding of some major issues related to globalization than as a subfield of global studies. In this unique contribution to conceptualizing, establishing, experiencing, and challenging cosmopolitanism, each chapter seizes the paradoxical dialectic of opening up and closing up, of enlightenment and counter-enlightenment, of hope and despair at work in the global world, while the volume as a whole insists on the moral, intellectual, structural, and historical resources that still make cosmopolitanism a real possibility—and not just wishful thinking—even in these hard times.

Contributors include: John Agnew, Daniele Archibugi, Paul Bagguley, Esperança Bielsa, Estevão Bosco, Stéphane Chauvier, Daniel Chernilo, Vincenzo Cicchelli, Vittorio Cotesta, Stéphane Dufoix, David Held, Robert Holton, Yasmin Hussain, David Inglis, Lauren Langman, Pietro Maffettone, Sylvie Mesure, Magdalena Nowicka, Sylvie Octobre, Delphine Pagès-El Karaoui, Massimo Pendenza, Alain Policar, Frédéric Ramel, Laurence Roulleau-Berger, Hiro Saito, Camille Schmoll, Bryan S. Turner, Clive Walker, Daniel J. Whelan.
The Cultural Political Economy of the Construction Industry in Turkey analyses the growth of the popularity of the AKP, the Turkish president Erdogan’s political party, through the lens of the construction sector. It provides a comprehensive analysis of the question of hegemony and the electoral success of the AKP – despite frequent economic downturns and ferocious political conflicts including a coup attempt and rekindled armed struggle against the Kurdish movement. In this book, Karatepe critically examines the party’s ability to satisfy the needs and wishes of different classes. Erdogan’s status in the political landscape and his party’s popularity are discussed from different perspectives. By taking the construction sector as an example, the book also offers an analysis on the change in the urban landscape of modern Turkey.
In Education in China, ca. 1840–present Meimei Wang, Bas van Leeuwen and Jieli Li offer a description of the transformation of the Chinese education system from the traditional Confucian teaching system to a modern mode. In doing so, they touch on various debates about education such as the speed of the educational modernization around 1900, the role of female education, and the economic efficiency of education. This description is combined with relevant data stretching from the second half of 19th century to present collected mainly from statistical archives and contemporary investigations.
This volume critically examines gender inequality, its origins, and its social and economic implications in Latin America, with a particular focus on Ecuador. For that purpose, Pablo Quiñonez and Claudia Maldonado-Erazo bring together a collection of articles that provide insights from different disciplines, including political economy, history, development studies, political science, microeconomics, and macroeconomics.

In Ecuador, as in Latin America as a whole, women dedicate more time than men to unpaid activities while being discriminated against in multiple areas, including labor markets, politics, and access to high-ranking positions. Furthermore, these problems are even greater for women from rural areas and ethnic minorities.

Contributors include: Rafael Alvarado, María Anchundia Places, Esteban Arévalo, Diana Cabrera Montecé, Edwin Espinoza Piguave, Gabriela Gallardo, Danny Granda, Claudia Maldonado-Erazo, Wendy Mora, Diana Morán Chiquito, Sayonara Morejón, Carlos Moreno-Hurtado, María Moreno Zea, Ana Oña Macías, Pablo Ponce, Pablo Quiñonez, Valeria Recalde, Josefina Rosales, Ximena Songor-Jaramillo, and Daniel Zea
Growth and Change in Neoliberal Capitalism brings together selected essays written by Alfredo Saad-Filho, one of the most prominent Marxist political economists today. This book offers a rich analysis of long-term economic development in the current stage of capitalism, the new relations of dependence between countries, the prospects for poor countries, and the progressive alternatives to neoliberalism. The volume also provides a detailed set of studies of the political economy of Brazil, tracking its achievements, tragedies, contradictions and limitations from the economic transition to from import-substituting industrialisation to neoliberalism, and from military dictatorship to democracy, in order to explain the catastrophes currently unfolding in that country.
Author: Henryk Grossman
Editor: Rick Kuhn
Henryk Grossman is best-known as a Marxist economist but he also wrote valuable political texts as a leader of the revolutionary organisation of Jewish workers in the Polish province of Austria, before the First World War, as a member of the Communist Workers Party of Poland, during the early 1920s, and as a Marxist academic during the early 1930s. These writings dealt with the political situation, tactics and strategy of Jewish Social Democratic Party of Galicia, the initial reception of Marxism in Poland and then substantial entries on left wing movements, organisations and individuals in a multi-volume reference work.
The German Social Democratic Party was the world’s first million-strong political party and was the main force pushing for the democratisation of Imperial Germany before the First World War. This book examines the themes around which the party organized its mainly working-class membership, and analyses the experiences and outlook of rank-and-file party members as well as the party’s press and publications. Key themes include: the Lassalle cult and leadership, nationalism and internationalism, attitudes to work, the politics of subsistence, the effects of military service, reading and the diffusion of Marx’s ideas, cultural organisations, and socialism and republicanism under the Imperial German state. Before 1914, the party successfully simultaneously addressed workers’ everyday concerns while offering the prospect of a better future.
Marine Insurance in Renaissance Florence
Risky Markets explores a crucial moment in the history of insurance, when tools designed to tackle sea risks were in their first making. Renaissance Florence is the setting for one of the first attempts to develop a market specialized in protecting maritime trade. Drawing on a unique collection of sources, the book provides a wide ranging account about the players, institutions, business practices and organizations of the insurance business, shedding light on the forecasting techniques underwriters used. Ceccarelli shows that the market was a small club where trust relations and shared codes of conduct prevail over competition. In a world without probability this was the way by which a business community managed transforming uncertainty into a calculable risk.