Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 303 items for :

  • Literature & Culture x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
Investigating the Origins of Little People Myths in Taiwan and Beyond
Volume Editors: and
This volume, edited by Tobie Openshaw and Dean Karalekas, will guide you on a multidisciplinary journey through Indigenous peoples’ centuries-old lore of “little people” in Taiwan and the Pacific. Learn about the Taiwan SaiSiyat people’s paSta’ay ritual, still held to this day to commemorate the koko ta’ay. Follow the distribution of the legends, interspersed with original stories by modern Indigenous authors. Explore the archaeological find of small-statured negrito remains in Taiwan, and delve into the most current research on the topic by linguists, anthropologists, folklorists, and other specialists to unravel the mystery of what—or who—inspired these ancient legends.
Volume Editor:
Canvasing a range of materials that include early tales of exemplarity, medieval song lyrics, Ming-Qing poetry and plucked rhymes, twentieth century writings about revolutionaries, opera stars, missionaries, and contemporary fiction, this volume illustrates the discourse and representation of friendship in which women gain agency and participate in broader arguments about ethics, politics, and religious transcendence. Friendship prompts reflections on gender roles, becomes the venue of literary self-consciousness, and heightens the sense of literary community. Gender and community function in new ways through the public dimension of friendship, and most importantly, the intersections of gender and friendship enable us to rethink other relationships.
Author:
In what ways did Qing gentry women’s concern for gender and social propriety shape their assertions of female subjectivity and agency? How did they exploit the state promotion of female virtue and Confucian morality for self-fulfillment?
With a focus on three of the most widely acclaimed mid-Qing women authors, this book uses both synchronic and diachronic approaches to analyze writings on conjugal love, widowhood, women’s education, maternal teaching, boudoir objects, and history, illustrating their vibrant, gendered revision of literati poetic convention, thus proposing an alternative analytical framework that goes beyond the rigid dichotomy of compliance versus resistance.
Among the longest continuously performed dramatic forms in the world, nō and kyōgen have a wealth of connections to Japanese culture more broadly construed. The current book brings together under one cover the most important elements of the history and culture of the two arts, profiting from the research of both Japanese and non-Japanese scholars, and offering many new insights.
It takes a more ambitious view of nō and kyōgen than previous studies and represents the achievements of a diverse range of scholars from a broad range of disciplines.
Toward an Anthropological History of Emotion and Its Social Management
This multi-contributor volume examines the evolving relationship between fear, heterodoxy and crime in traditional China. It throws light on how these three variously interwoven elements shaped local policies and people’s perceptions of the religious, ethnic, and cultural “other.”
Authors depart from the assumption that “otherness” is constructed, stereotyped and formalized within the moral, political and legal institutions of Chinese society. The capacity of their findings to address questions about the emotional dimension of mass mobilization, the socio-political implications of heterodoxy, and attributions of crime is the result of integrating multiple sources of knowledge from history, religious studies and social science.
Contributors are Ágnes Birtalan, Ayumu Doi, Fabian Graham, Hung Tak Wai, Jing Li, Hang Lin, Tommaso Previato, and Noriko Unno.
Korean Sinitic Poetry from Ancient Times to 1945: Si in the East offers a ground-breaking introduction to the oral performative aspect of Korean Sinitic poetry (hansi 漢詩). The anthology introduces 51 representative works of Korean Sinitic poetry from the 9th to early 20th century including 9 by women poets.
Each poem is discussed with ample notes on allusions and expressions, sounds and verbal glossing (hyŏnt’o), and commentaries that look beyond the geographical boundary of Korea.
Overview essays offer cultural and literary history in a broader East Asian context, and detailed linguistic guides emphasize the musicality and orality of this treasured literary tradition.