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Series:

H.A.G. Houghton, C.M. Kreinecker, R.F. MacLachlan and C.J. Smith

Series:

H.A.G. Houghton, C.M. Kreinecker, R.F. MacLachlan and C.J. Smith

Series:

H.A.G. Houghton, C.M. Kreinecker, R.F. MacLachlan and C.J. Smith

Series:

H.A.G. Houghton, C.M. Kreinecker, R.F. MacLachlan and C.J. Smith

Series:

Albert Rijksbaron

Edited by Rutger J. Allan, Evert van Emde Boas and Luuk Huitink

Abstract

This chapter examines the syntactic function and semantic value of the particle combination καὶ … δέ. It defends the view of Denniston and Kühner-Gerth that the combination consists of connective καί and adverbial δέ (meaning something like ‘and, on the other hand’) against the more common view that it is the other way round (yielding a meaning ‘and also’). It is shown that καὶ … δέ either connects single nouns, adjectives or verbs, or clauses and sentences. In the former case καί cannot be omitted, while in the latter case the existence of correlative constructions (e.g. τε … καί …) demonstrates that here, too, καί is the connector. It is argued that the function of adverbial δέ is a pragmatic one; it sets the word or phrase which it modifies apart as an item to be considered in its own right.

Series:

Albert Rijksbaron

Edited by Rutger J. Allan, Evert van Emde Boas and Luuk Huitink

Abstract

This chapter takes up the vexed question of the coherence of the proem of Hesiod’s Theogony (1–115). It makes more precise, and at the same time modifies, Verdenius’ view that the unity of the proem lies more in the continuity of its progress than in the interdependency of its parts. In a line by line commentary on relevant items it establishes the sequence of actions, started off by the imperfect στεῖχον (10). It is also shown, however, that unity is created by the fact that the imperfect verb forms, which refer to sights and sounds, presuppose a human observer, and that this observer can be identified with the poet himself, who experienced these events in the past. Further unity is created by the recurrent references to Hesiod as a servant (θεράπων) of the Muses.