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The Modern Remaking of Dutch-Chinese Relations, 1927–1950
In this meticulously researched volume, Vincent Chang resurrects a near forgotten yet pivotal chapter of Dutch-Chinese ties to narrate how World War II, the civil war in China, and Indonesia’s decolonization redefined and remade this age-old bilateral relationship.
Drawing on a unique range of hitherto unexplored archives, the book explains how China’s nascent rise on the global scene and the Netherlands’ simultaneous decline as a colonial power shaped events in Dutch-controlled Indonesia (and vice versa) and prompted a recalibration of their mutual ties, culminating in the Netherlands’ recognition of the People’s Republic and laying the foundations for Dutch and Chinese policies through to the present.
Offering insightful analyses of power dynamics and international law at the close of empire, this book is a critical resource for historians and China specialists as well as scholars of international relations.
In this new book on Africa-China relations, Ngonlardje Kabra Mbaidjol strongly engages in the heated debates on African cooperation with China, an increassingly rich and powerful partner. The current dominant view highlights the neo-colonial and exploitative nature of these relations with a denial of any positive results for African people. However, the growing China-Africa partnership took its roots at Bandung 1955 conference, to culminate with an overt competition between China and other nations over African resources. For many, "a new scramble for Africa" emerges. The author argues there is rather a "global scramble for China," a fierce battle to get the PRC's kind attention. Africa is right to engage the struggle to access China's development funding. Africa may wish to avoid being distracted by rival voices, but to endeavor doing its own homework and rehearse for the global competiton, in the only interest of African people. Mbaidjol's book unpacks Africa's preparedness and rehearsal strategy.
Author: NIU Jun
In The Cold War and the Origin of Diplomacy of People’s Republic of China, Niu Jun offers a new analytical framework for understanding the Cold War and PRC’s diplomacy from 1949 to 1955. He sees it as an interactive historical process between the Cold War, China’s domestic transition from revolution to nation-building, and the revolutionary ideology in the minds of Chinese leaders and Chinese people.

Niu Jun’s analytical framework sheds fresh light on the widely studied events of PRC’s diplomacy such as China’s alliance with the Soviet Union and confrontation with the U.S., military actions on the Korean Peninsula and in Indochina, settlement of the first Taiwan Strait crisis, development of nuclear weapons, and so on.
In China, East Asia and the European Union specialist authors from both Europe and Asia reflect on the dynamic relationship between the three actors from an International Relations perspective. The book is a testimony to China’s seemingly unstoppable rise, both in the East Asian region and in the relationship with the EU and its member states. The authors investigate why the economic links between the European Union and East Asia have become so firmly established, while in comparison the political bond has remained underdeveloped. They conclude that the crises the EU is currently facing seriously affect its manoeuvring space vis-a-vis China and its neighbours, both economically and politically.


Contributors are: Ding Chun, Neil Duggan, Enrico Fardella, Frank Gaenssmantel, Tjalling Halbertsma, Daniel R Hammond, Jan van der Harst, Elisa Hörhager, Jing Jing, Werner Pascha, Sanne Kamerling, David Kerr, Silja Keva, Christopher K. Lamont, Li Junyang, Feng Liu, Maaike Okano-Heijmans, Nadya Stoynova, and Herman Voogsgeerd.
Its Economic Challenges and Foreign Policy Initiatives
Editor: SHAO Binhong
“How will China develop under Xi Jinping’s rule? Is Xi Jinping, and by extension the Chinese state, now acting from a position of strength or weakness? In other words, do his policies appear to be the actions of a strong leader of an increasingly powerful nation? Or, are they the actions of an insecure one, uncertain of how legitimate the state is in the eyes of the population over which it rules? As with each of the preceding volumes in this series, this book is so valuable because it provides English language translations of the most prominent recent writings on these issues by China’s leading scholars in the fields of international relations and political economy. This volume is an invaluable resource to all those looking to gain a deeper and more nuanced understanding of where China is headed during the Xi Jinping era.” – Allen Carlson, Cornell University
Chinese Foreign Policy Elites Discuss Emerging Trends in International Politics
Editor: SHAO Binhong
Where do we see China’s changes? What are the guiding principles behind these changes? Are China’s diplomatic policies and international strategies more reflective of its own national conditions or international trends? How will China balance its ideology with national interests? How does China see the current international order and its new position within the existing order? Besides answering these basic questions, this volume considers two other important issues: First, the future of China after its era of continuous high-speed growth; and second, (the all-important question in China’s foreign affairs) the future of Sino-US relations?

2013 was China’s first year under new leadership, and there is a consensus amongst researchers of China’s international affairs that the diplomatic practices China undertook to a great extent demonstrated new characteristics, perspectives, and requirements of the new leadership.
Balance, Imbalance and Rebalance
Editor: SHAO Binhong
What is China's rightful place on the world stage? Will the world remain unipolar as signs of American decline appear to be mounting? How can China maintain a harmonious relationship with its neighbors? What does China intend to do with the new power and influence that appears to be at its disposal? In light of emergent post-2008 economic realities, how should China adjust its foreign economic relations? This volume, the first of its kind, gathers a collection of translations of influential essays, talks, and papers on Chinese foreign policy, national security, and foreign economic relations written by Chinese elites. Many papers have also served as propositions for policy prescriptions to China's leaders, the vast majority of which have to date only been available in Chinese.