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Series:

Lucas F. Mateo-Seco

Abstract

Although the ‘Christological question’ is not the center of Contra Eunomium I, it is significantly present in the text, since the Trinitarian perspective directly affects Christology. As Gregory himself affirms: the generation of the Logos is the same question as that of Christ’s divine filiation (CE I 288–291 [GNO I, 111–112]). The present study focuses on the analysis of the Christological elements of CE I, emphasizing their convergence with the core of Gregory’s thought. Although the references to Christological and Soteriological issues are discreet and scarce in CE I, they are important. For Gregory, what is at stake in the debate with Eunomius is not only the Trinitarian faith but also the radical novelty of Christianity as opposed to Judaism, the mediation and the reign of Christ, and Christ as radiance that manifests the Father’s glory. It is also Gregory’s entire mystical theology that reacts against Eunomius: only if Christ is God is he deserving of that mystical love that converts the soul into spouse of the Word and leads one out of himself in a sobria ebrietas, in a tireless search without growing tired.

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Martien F.G. Parmentier

Abstract

This paper, presented originally in the 6th International Colloquium on Gregory of Nyssa, offers the transcription of the Syriac fragments of Contra Eunomium I, conserved in the manuscripts of the British Museum at the indication of Wright’s catalogue, which describes a large part of this collection. This paper includes, moreover, a list of the fragments of the other Contra Eunomium books that are conserved there. Most fragments may well belong to translations of the sixth century, since they are neither free nor precise.

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Translator Stuart George Hall

Abstract

In introducing his English version of Contra Eunomium I Stuart George Hall first describes the textual basis, and earlier editions and translations of Gregory’s text. He describes the text as edited by Jaeger, the known lacuna in the manuscripts and its recent partial filling from later fragments preserved in Syriac. He analyzes in detail the structure of the work, correcting and superseding the analysis published in the original Proceedings of the Pamplona Colloquium. Hall finally discusses the principles followed in translating, and some terminology of special theological significance. His English Version follows, where his notes to the Translation give details of a number of textual and exegetical points not otherwise observed.

Series:

Stuart George Hall

Abstract

In introducing his English version of Contra Eunomium I Stuart George Hall first describes the textual basis, and earlier editions and translations of Gregory’s text. He describes the text as edited by Jaeger, the known lacuna in the manuscripts and its recent partial filling from later fragments preserved in Syriac. He analyzes in detail the structure of the work, correcting and superseding the analysis published in the original Proceedings of the Pamplona Colloquium. Hall finally discusses the principles followed in translating, and some terminology of special theological significance. His English Version follows, where his notes to the Translation give details of a number of textual and exegetical points not otherwise observed.

Series:

Elias D. Moutsoulas

Résumé

Pneumatology occupies an important place in Gregory of Nyssa’s theology, not only because the faith in the divinity of the Holy Spirit is one of the fundamental dogmas of the Trinitarian faith, but also due to the particular circumstances of Gregory’s time and especially because of his debate with Eunomius. This article, presented originally in the 6th International Colloquium on Gregory of Nyssa and now re-edited, examines the Pneumatology of Contra Eunomium I centered on the idea that the Holy Spirit, just like the Son, does not belong to the sphere of created nature, but is uncreated. The texts of CE I show that Gregory’s Pneumatology stresses, more than that of Basil, the incomprehensibility of God and the unity of operation of the three Persons of the Trinity as well as their common energy. Lastly, this article analyzes the debate on Gregory’s theology concerning the procession of the Holy Spirit.

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Edited by Miguel Brugarolas

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Ilaria Vigorelli

Abstract

Penetrating to the heart of Eunomius’s misunderstanding of the initial formulation advanced by Basil, this article brings an analysis of the fact that the names of the “Father” and the “Son” refer to σχέσις.

If in Basil the revealed names “understood in and of themselves (καθ’ἑαυτὰ) only indicate reciprocal relation (πρὸς ἄλληλα σχέσιν)”, Eunomius doctrinal re-formulation does not allow him to include relation qua talis within the meaning of the relative names. Gregory of Nyssa’s correction of his interpretation is of particular interest not only for Trinitarian theology, but for the development of ontology that derives from it.

Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World

From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity

Series:

Edited by Anders Klostergaard Petersen and George H. van Kooten

This first volume of the new Brill series “Ancient Philosophy & Religion” is a collection of articles by scholars of Classics, Ancient Philosophy, and Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity. The articles are based on papers presented at two colloquia on the interface between Ancient Philosophy and Religion at the universities of Aarhus and Cambridge. They focus extensively on Platonic philosophy and piety and sketch an emerging religio-philosophical discourse in ancient Judaism (both in the Sibylline Oracles and 4 Maccabees). Furthermore, this volume studies Seneca’s religio-philosophical understanding of 'consolation', compares early depictions of Jesus with those of ancient philosophers, and, finally, reconsiders responses of pagan philosophers to Christianity from the second century to Late Antiquity.