Browse results

Reading Islam

Life and Politics of Brotherhood in Modern Turkey

Series:

Fabio Vicini

In Reading Islam Fabio Vicini offers a journey within the intimate relations, reading practices, and forms of intellectual engagement that regulate Muslim life in two enclosed religious communities in Istanbul. Combining anthropological observation with textual and genealogical analysis, he illustrates how the modes of thought and social engagement promoted by these two communities are the outcome of complex intellectual entanglements with modern discourses about science, education, the self, and Muslims’ place and responsibility in society. In this way, Reading Islam sheds light on the formation of new generations of faithful and socially active Muslims over the last thirty years and on their impact on the turn of Turkey from an assertive secularist Republic to an Islamic-oriented form of governance.

Muslims at the Margins of Europe

Finland, Greece, Ireland and Portugal

Series:

Edited by Tuomas Martikainen, José Mapril and Adil Hussain Khan

This volume focuses on Muslims in Finland, Greece, Ireland and Portugal, representing the four corners of the European Union today. It highlights how Muslim experiences can be understood in relation to a country’s particular historical routes, political economies, colonial and post-colonial legacies, as well as other factors, such as church-state relations, the role of secularism(s), and urbanisation. This volume also reveals the incongruous nature of the fact that national particularities shaping European Muslim experiences cannot be understood independently of European and indeed global dynamics. This makes it even more important to consider every national context when analysing patterns in European Islam, especially those that have yet to be fully elaborated. The chapters in this volume demonstrate the contradictory dynamics of European Muslim contexts that are simultaneously distinct yet similar to the now familiar ones of Western Europe’s most populous countries.

Constance Arminjon

Abstract

In a comparative perspective, this article analyses the doctrinal debates that arose in Sunni and Shi’ite Islam after the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. During a couple of decades this text hardly brought about any response in Islam. From the 1980s onwards, an increasing number of prominent thinkers started confronting their legal tradition to that from which human rights derive. While comparing both legal systems, they contribute to major and contrasting developments in contemporary Islamic legal thought.