Browse results

Ancient philosophy has from the outset inspired phenomenological philosophers in a special way. Phenomenological Interpretations of Ancient Philosophy offers fresh perspectives on the manner in which ancient Greek thought has influenced phenomenology and traces the history of this reception. Unlike various related treatments, the present volume offers a broad account of this topic that includes chapters on Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Jacob Klein, Hannah Arendt, Eugen Fink, Jan Patočka, Emmanuel Levinas, and Jacques Derrida.

This collection of essays, edited by Kristian Larsen and Pål Rykkja Gilbert, is addressed to students of ancient philosophy and the phenomenological tradition as well as to readers who have a general interest in the fascinating, yet complex, connection between ancient Greek thought and phenomenological philosophy.

Contributions by: Jussi Backman, Pål Rykkja Gilbert, Burt Hopkins, Filip Karfík, Alexander Kozin, Kristian Larsen, Arnaud Macé, Claudio Majolino, Hans Ruin, Thomas Schwarz Wentzer, Vigdis Songe-Møller, Tanja Staehler, Morten S. Thaning and Charlotta Weigelt.
Volume Editor: Jeremiah Morelock
How to Critique Authoritarian Populism: Methodologies of the Frankfurt School offers a comprehensive introduction to the techniques used by the early Frankfurt School to study and combat authoritarianism and authoritarian populism. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in the writings of the early Frankfurt School, at the same time as authoritarian populist movements are resurging in Europe and the Americas. This volume shows why and how Frankfurt School methodologies can and should be used to address the rise of authoritarianism today. Critical theory scholars are assembled from a variety of disciplines to discuss Frankfurt School approaches to dialectical philosophy, psychoanalytic theory, human subjects research, discourse analysis and media studies.

Contributors include: Robert J. Antonio, Stefanie Baumann, Christopher Craig Brittain, Dustin J. Byrd, Mariana Caldas Pinto Ferreira, Panayota Gounari, Peter-Erwin Jansen, Imaculada Kangussu, Douglas Kellner, Dan Krier, Lauren Langman, Claudia Leeb, Gregory Joseph Menillo, Jeremiah Morelock, Felipe Ziotti Narita, Michael R. Ott, Charles Reitz, Avery Schatz, Rudolf J. Siebert, William M. Sipling, David Norman Smith, Daniel Sullivan, and AK Thompson.
Author: Brian Harding

Abstract

Beginning with a brief discussion of Dominique Janicaud’s proposal for a minimalist phenomenology, I turn to the work G. van der Leeuw and argue that his work in the phenomenology of religion can be profitably read as a minimalist phenomenology. I do this by focusing mainly on his methodological remarks, but do occasionally refer to his analyses of particular religious phenomena. Finally, the paper closes with some suggestions about how to think of the relationship between minimalist phenomenology and religious belief.

In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion
Editor / Translator: David Healan
Metabolic form inverts itself into content. Highlighting Hegel's conceptual realism, Hoffmann focuses on an undervalued move in his dialectic: inversion (μεταβολή). From precursors in Kant the author validates the philosopher's claim in not supplying a completeness proof for his table of categories: it's easy! Hoffmann shows how his new approach works on Hegel's central terms–paradigmatically language and individuality–in detailed analytical work through the two great masterpieces: Phenomenology and Objective Logic. From consciousness inversion at the start of the former to the modalities and subjectivity of substance at the end of the latter, Hoffmann develops Hegel's epochal conceptual realism and metabolic dialectic as keys to substantiating the philosopher's claim for his Logic: it is indeed the science of absolute form!
Author: Onur Acaroglu
In Rethinking Marxist Theories of Transition, Onur Acaroglu traces the concept of transition across the tracts of Classical and Western Marxism. Rarely directly invoked, transition between different societies appears as an imminent social reality, and a useful conceptual tool for critical social theory.

Transitions as qualitative shifts between societies are often considered as eventual historical stages, or effaced altogether. Theorising transition in a new direction, Onur Acaroglu elaborates a theory of temporal dislocation. Considering transition through a framework of out-of-joint temporalities, the notion comes through as an undervalued tendency in social reproduction.

Abstract

Among the ancients, there was no proper conception of the I. Yet an I emerges in ancient Israel. I therefore inquire into the philosophical anthropology of ancient Israel. How did the I emerge? By interpreting the Song of Songs as political myth, from which a philosophical anthropology can be unearthed and reconstructed, I theorize that not only an I, but also a different kind of we emerged through gift-dynamics. Then I demonstrate that these gift-dynamics are compatible with the ancient Israelites’ religious-political institutions and manifest itself in their collective psyche.

In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion
In: Absolute Form: Modality, Individuality and the Principle of Philosophy in Kant and Hegel
In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion

Abstract

In this interview, Jean-Luc Marion recalls the intellectual world of Paris in 1970s, reflecting on how his engagement with the ubiquitous “death of God” question led to the sketches of God without Being first presented at this 1979 Colloquium, and discusses the criticism it provoked not only from Heideggerians but also from Thomists. He discusses the reception history of phenomenology in France the reasons for the particular power it gained among thinkers of his generation. Finally, he recounts how his work has led from the 1979 Colloquium through the “Theological Turn” and up to his forthcoming D’ ailleurs, la révélation (Grasset, 2020), which he briefly previews here. Marion closes with words on originality, criticism, and the particular challenges of the contemporary world that await philosophical thinking today.

In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion
In: Absolute Form: Modality, Individuality and the Principle of Philosophy in Kant and Hegel