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Author: Paul Hammond
Are we free agents? This perennial question is addressed by tragedy when it dramatizes the struggle of individuals with supernatural forces, or maps the inner conflict of a mind divided against itself.

The first part of this book follows the adaptations of four myths as they migrate from classical Greek tragedy to Seneca and on to seventeenth-century France: the stories of Agamemnon, Oedipus, Medea, and Phaedra. Detailed linguistic analysis charts the playwrights’ contrasting assumptions about agency and autonomy. In the second part, six plays by Corneille and Racine are discussed to show how the problem of agency and free will is explored in scenarios which show protagonists who are in thrall to their past, to their rulers, or to their own ideals.
Author: Ruobing Xian
The Odyssey is ‘ein Epos des Raums’. As the narrative unfolds, a number of speculative spaces are made vivid before the eyes of the audience: the locus amoenus surrounding Calypso’s cave, Alcinous’ palace, the landscape of Ithaca, and not least Odysseus’ megaron. The present study argues that the representation of space in the Odyssey plays a much more important role in the epic’s narrative dynamics than is hitherto recognized. By drawing on different approaches to Homeric poetry aiming at profound literary interpretation, this book offers close reading of selected passages from the Odyssey, focusing on the linguistic form as well as the narrative function of the epic’s representation of space.

Die Odyssee ist 'ein Epos des Raums'. Während sich die Erzählung entfaltet, werden der Hörerschaft einige spekulative Räumlichkeiten vor Augen geführt: der locus amoenus um Kalypsos Höhle herum, Alkinoos' Palast, die Ithakalandschaft und nicht zuletzt die Halle des Odysseus. Das vorliegende Buch vertritt die These, dass die Raumdarstellung in der Odyssee eine erheblich wichtigere Rolle spielt als bisher erkannt worden ist. Sich auf verschiedene Ansätze stützend, die auf eine tiefgreifende literarische Interpretation homerischer Dichtung abzielen, bietet dieses Buch eine genaue Lektüre ausgewählter Passagen aus der Odyssee, wobei der Schwerpunkt auf der sprachlichen Form sowie der narrativen Funktion der Raumdarstellung des Epos liegt.
Text, Interpretation, and Reception
In Ilias Latina. Text, Interpretation, and Reception, the contributors approach this short poem, whose appeal and importance have not been sufficiently appreciated, from a multitude of scholarly perspectives. The challenging synthesis of the different issues shows that both a new edition and a modern literary interpretation of the poem are needed. Particularly focusing in various ways on the technique of vertere, the papers concern four main issues: the different elements of the narration, such as macro- and microstructure, single Bauformen and motifs, characters and scenes; the intertextual allusions to Homer and the texts of the Roman poetic tradition; the literary genre, the explicitly metaliterary passages and the implicit narrative and poetic choices; the medieval reception of the Ilias Latina.
Through the variety of its scholarly perspectives, Brill Companion to Theocritus offers a tool for the study of one of antiquity’s foremost poets. Offering a thorough examination of textual transmission, ancient commentaries, literary dialect, and poetic forms, the present volume considers Theocritus’ work from novel theoretical perspectives, such as gender and emotions. It expands the usual field of inquiry to include religion, and the poet’s reception in Late Antiquity and early modern times. The various chapters promote Theocritus’ profile as an erudite poet, who both responds to and inaugurates a rich and variegated tradition. The combination of these various perspectives places Theocritus at the crossroads of Ptolemaic patronage, contemporary society, and art.
Volume Editor: Deborah Beck
This edited volume, arising from the 2019 conference “Orality and Literacy: Repetition,” explores some of the many forms and uses of repetition, in poetry, philosophy, and inscriptions, from Homeric epic through the Latin novel and the Gospels to reception in the twentieth century. All human communication depends on repeating signs that are comprehensible to the speaker and the addressee. Yet “repetition” takes many specific forms, in different performance contexts, time periods, and literary genres. Repetition may operate within one utterance, or across several times, places, and artists. The relationship between two repeated utterances cannot always be determined with certainty. But repetition offers exciting ways to understand the communicative process in oral and literate contexts across the ancient world.
Volume Editors: Serena Citro and Fabio Tanga
Philology, philosophy, commentary and reception in Plutarch's work are only some of the main topics discussed within a large academic output devoted to the writer of Chaeronea by Professor Paola Volpe Cacciatore. The volume is divided into four sections: Plutarchean Fragments, Quaestiones convivales, Religion & Philosophy, and Plutarch's Reception from Humanism to Modern Times. The eighteen studies collected in this volume, originally published in Italian and here translated into English, concern the Corpus Plutarcheum and, especially, some Plutarchean fragments, including Table-Talks, De Iside et Osiride, the treatises against the Stoics, De genio Socratis, De liberis educandis and De musica. The volume is a tribute to celebrate the lifelong study of Plutarch's work by Professor Paola Volpe Cacciatore, one of the most remarkable Plutarchean scholars of the last decades.
Studies in Book History, the Classical Tradition, and Humanism in Honor of Craig Kallendorf
Habent sua fata libelli honors the work of Craig Kallendorf, offering studies in several fields in which he chiefly distinguished himself: the history of the book and reading, the classical tradition and reception studies, Renaissance humanism, and Virgilian scholarship with a special focus on the creative transformation of the Aeneid through the centuries. The volume is rounded out by an appreciation of Craig Kallendorf, including a review of his scholarship and its significance.

In addition to the topics mentioned above, the volume’s twenty-five contributions by scholars in America and Europe are of relevance to those working in the fields of classical philology, Neo-Latin, political philosophy, poetry and poetics, printing and print culture, Romance languages, art history, translation studies, and Renaissance and early modern Europe generally.

Contributors include: Alessandro Barchiesi, Susanna Braund, Hélène Casanova-Robin, Jean-Louis Charlet, Federica Ciccolella, Ingrid De Smet, Margaret Ezell, Edoardo Fumagalli, Julia Gaisser, Lucia Gualdo Rosa, James Hankins, Andrew Laird, Marc Laureys, John Monfasani, Timothy Moore, Colette Nativel, Marianne Pade, Lisa Pon, Wayne Rebhorn, Alden Smith, Sarah Spence, Fabio Stok, Richard Thomas, and Marino Zorzi.
Author: John Tholen
Printers in the early modern Low Countries produced no fewer than 152 editions of Ovid’s Metamorphoses. John Tholen investigates what these editions can tell us about the early modern application of the popular ancient text. Analysis of paratexts shows, for example, how editors and commentators guide readers to Ovid’s potentially subversive contents. Paratextual infrastructures intended to create commercial credibility, but simultaneously were a response to criticism of reading the Metamorphoses. The book combines two often separated fields of research: book history and reception studies. It provides a compelling case study of how investigation into the material contexts of ancient texts sheds new light on early modern receptions of antiquity.
Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond
Choreonarratives, a collection of essays by classicists, dance scholars, and dance practitioners, explores the uses of dance as a narrative medium. Case studies from Greek and Roman antiquity illustrate how dance contributed to narrative repertoires in their multimodal manifestations, while discussions of modern and contemporary dance shed light on practices, discourses, and ancient legacies regarding the art of dancing stories.
Benefitting from the crossover of different disciplinary, historical, and artistic perspectives, the volume looks beyond current narratological trends and investigates the manifold ways in which dance can acquire meaning, disclose storyworlds ranging from myths to individual life-stories, elicit the narratees’ responses, and generate powerful narratives of its own. Together, the eclectic approaches of Choreonarratives>7i> rethink dance’s capacity to tell, enrich, and inspire stories.

Contributors are Sophie M. Bocksberger, Iris J. Bührle, Marie-Louise Crawley, Samuel N. Dorf, Karin Fenböck, Susan L. Foster, Laura Gianvittorio-Ungar, Sarah Olsen, Lucia Ruprecht, Karin Schlapbach, Danuta Shanzer, Christina Thurner, Yana Zarifi-Sistovari, Bernhard Zimmermann
Author: Robin Greene
In this volume, Robin J. Greene traces the development of Greek elegy and lyric in the hands of Hellenistic and Roman-era poets, from literary superstars such as Callimachus and Theocritus to more obscure, often anonymous authors. Designed as a guide for advanced students and scholars working in adjacent fields, this volume introduces and explores the diverse body of surviving later Greek elegy and lyric, contextualizes it within Hellenistic and Roman culture and politics, and surveys contemporary critical interpretations, methodological approaches, and avenues for future study.