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The craft of teaching and learning is like playing in a symphony orchestra; every instrument has a voice and every voice is integral to the whole. The arts, history, anthropology, and philosophy and their forged discourses offer us a series of cautionary tales about the multiplicity of ways we can see and understand our world, ways we often ignore in the classroom. In the case of epistemology, and pedagogy in particular, we have hinged our understanding on a binary of opposites engaged in a dialectic dance and a type of discourse constructed to describe and explain it. The art and act of teaching in this as-if world necessitates teachers to be public intellectuals; intellectual symbols who represent something more than just subject-knowledge expertise but serve as conduits between the discourses of our world.
Established genres and discourses are exclusionary. The vast migration of people and ideas is producing a new set of presuppositions. The manner in which we decode other discourses and fuse them into meanings, both personal and shared, is the root of both teaching and learning, giving us a window into the way that each form of thought is connected, both historically and experientially. Look around you, your school is becoming the United Nations, but it’s not so united. Don’t aim for truth, aim for understanding. Today’s students construct and deconstruct in a multitude of ways on an as-needed, just-in-time basis. Since ideas of difference are often nudged but unacknowledged, we are in danger of becoming pedagogical dinosaurs, not heeding change until it is too late.
Teaching and learning are construction zones, so get out your hard hat. These constructions are possibilities that need to be discussed and negotiated, allowing us to sidestep the traps of grand narratives and a hierarchy of discplinarity and research methodology. Our possibilities need to be forged on an anvil of diversity. These are the spaces, the interstices, where our voices become innovative and our silence offers a safe harbor. Spaces to listen, collaborate, and craft cautionary tales about our lives and the possibilities for a shared future.
International Perspectives
Teacher Assemblage is a groundbreaking report in the tradition of fieldwork in philosophy, using Michel Foucault’s and Gilles Deleuze’s ideas to better understand how accountability policy affected teachers. The case study examines different vectors of power and demonstrates how teachers interacted with each other, and interacted with their immediate policy environments. This unique book provides readers with grounded insights into Foucault’s and Deleuze’s ideas by paying close attention to the macro- and micro- political worlds of schools as teachers struggle with new forms of performance accountability. The book illustrates ideas of power, politics, and policy with a unique use of surrealist art to illustrate the philosophical ideas at play in the case study. The book will have a wide appeal to teachers, teacher educators, educational researchers, policy and curriculum scholars, art aficionados, and those interested in the thoughts of Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze.
Being with A/r/tography is a collection of essays that explain and exemplify the arts-based research methodology called a/r/tography. Edited by four scholars who are artists, researchers, and teachers (a/r/tographers), this book is a methodology book for practitioners in arts-based educational research. In addition to an introductory essay which contextualizes and theorizes the methodological framework of a/r/tography, the book is divided into three main thematic sections that are integral to a/r/tographical research: (1) self-study and autobiography; (2) communities of a/r/tographic practice; (3) ethics and activism. The book concludes with a consideration of issues related to assessment, validity, and interpretation.
Being with A/r/tography will be an excellent core text in graduate courses that focus on arts-based educational research, as well as a valuable text in pre-service teacher education programs. The book will also be significant for qualitative research courses in all the social sciences and the health sciences, including communication studies, nursing, counseling psychology, and arts therapy. The book provides a clear and comprehensive introduction to a/r/tography. Even though a/r/tography as a research methodology is relatively new in the scholarly field, Being with A/r/tography spells out how scholarly practitioners who are artists and researchers and teachers have been pursuing this kind of research for a long time.
Canadian Perspectives
This collection of timely articles is the first to explore the dynamics between globalization and education from a specifically Canadian perspective. The articles engage with emergent debates and new discourses around global orientations to citizenship education currently defining scholarly work and teaching practices in Canada. This book will, therefore, be of great interest to Canadian teacher educators who are seeking to infuse a global perspective into their pre-service programs as well as to globally-oriented undergraduate and graduate course instructors from a range of scholarly disciplines both in Canada and elsewhere. The Canadian perspective proves to be, not surprisingly, global in essence.
The articles contained in Citizenship Education in the Era of Globalization: Canadian Perspectives map the history of citizenship, citizenship education and global studies and probe the notion of global citizenship for its possibilities and impossibilities. Recognizing the importance of engaging with the lives of students and teachers, the contributions also include articles reporting on research and theory about such topics as the complexities of second-generation youth identity and the extent to which mainstream teachers can bring global citizenship education into their classrooms. The collection presents an engaging look into the theory and practice of citizenship education in Canada during a time when bringing global issues to the classroom is an imperative of democratic schooling.
Like other fields of study, teacher education defines itself both by what it includes and by what it excludes. Teacher educators and researchers have spent a great deal of time seeking and attempting to eradicate the flaws in existing structures and practices, but significantly less time learning to perceive the absences. The premise of this book is that until we can identify and begin to address what is absent, teacher education will be constrained by a perennial recycling of concerns that have characterized so much of research, policy and practice to date. If teacher education is to have a different future, we need to ask different and difficult questions. This book, with contributions from theorists in Australia, Canada and the United States, addresses the challenges we face in establishing a more hopeful future for teacher education. The authors’ provocative contributions identify what is ‘missing’ in teacher education while providing critical counterpoints to existing frames of reference in the field. In writing ‘against the grain’ they open up new conceptual spaces and exciting trajectories for a different teacher education.
Conceptual and Empirical Trends in the Teaching Profession
Editors: Jan Ax and Petra Ponte
Critiquing Praxis describes the contemporary state of the teaching profession based on different aspects of Dutch educational praxis, and the descriptions are followed by reflections from Australia and Scandinavian perspectives. Its critique of the current state of the profession, especially in the face of the centralisation of education policy and the decentralisation of responsibility to schools, has widespread application elsewhere in the world. The volume does not aim to judge those who made choices about schools and teacher education in the past; rather it aims to offer an evaluation of how the perspectives that shaped past choices were themselves shaped by ways of understanding the world, and by past historical conditions. In our turn, we who are making such choices and responding to such challenges now will ourselves be judged by history. That being so, we should prepare ourselves by learning from history. Critiquing Praxis offers us a unique opportunity to do that with a praxis model for critique that is mainly based on European perspectives in pedagogy and sociology.
Editor: Tony Di Petta
c ICT’s subtle and seductive impact on educational administration; globalisation; curriculum design, development and delivery; and teacher roles and responsibilities has challenged the privileged notion of how education in society is or should be delivered. Most schools and curricula require ICT enabled or supported courses as part of their mission or design. Yet the seeming ubiquitous adoption of ICT has not made the technology’s use any less controversial. There is much that is still puzzling and troubling about Information and Communication Technology and its impact on teachers and learners. The Emperor’s New Computer: ICT, Teaching and Learning presents nine chapters that reflect international points of view on the intersection of Information and Communication Technology and education, pose critical questions about ICT’s use and examine ways of navigating the complex paths that ICT has carved in all aspects of global education, society and culture.
Challenges for Education
In a range of professions, professional practice today is under threat. It is endangered, for example, by pressures of bureaucratic control, commodification, marketization, and the standardisation of practice in some professions. In these times, there is a need for deeper understandings of professional practice and how it develops through professional careers. Enabling Praxis: Challenges for education explores these questions in the context of initial and continuing professional education of teachers. It presents a theory of the development of praxis—morally committed action oriented by tradition—to show the ways praxis is enabled and constrained by the cultural-discursive, material and social-political conditions under which professional practice occurs. It introduces the notion of ‘practice architectures’ to show how particular conditions for practice shape the possibilities of praxis. The way these processes work is illustrated by detailed exploration of a number of cases of praxis development in a variety of educational settings, at a variety of levels—in teacher education for schools and for vocational education and training, in the continuing professional education of teachers, in educational administration, and in informal, community-based education for sustainability initiatives. The book provides conceptual resources that permit deeper analysis of the character, conduct and consequences of professional practice. It concludes with challenges for education, and for initial and continuing teacher education, suggesting that the contemporary threats to education as a professional practice call for revitalisation of the profession, professional bodies and the intellectual traditions that orient and guide educational practice.
Assessment and Knowledge Construction in Teacher Education
Global Citizenship Development and Sources of Moral Values
Getting involved' in society means becoming a human person by doing something for others and thus being connected to mankind and society. Youngsters who get involved, give meaning to life and develop a feeling of agency. But ‘getting involved’ is not easy. Getting involved’ is necessary for living together, creating democracy and sustainability of a global world. The paradox is that in a modern, multicultural society ‘getting involved’ is even more important than in a traditional, more monocultural society.
‘Getting involved’ relates to various scientific orientations. Political, sociological, psychological and pedagogical questions are at issue, and all of these will be consulted in this volume. The main perspective however remains the issue of identity development relating to ‘getting involved’, and will therefore be psychological.
This book gives a broad overview of current research in the field of moral development and citizenship. It shows the diversity of concepts, research methodologies, and educational practices. The book also shows the influence of local social, cultural and political contexts.
The book can help researchers, teacher educators, politicians and practitioners in finding new and better ways of supporting youngsters in their moral and civic identity development.