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Teachers in schools nowadays are challenged to create inclusive learning environments and safe spaces for encountering diversity in values, cultures and religions, as well as in (dis)ability and talent. Classrooms are micro-cosmoses in which local and global issues are confronted and addressed.

This volume discusses the characteristics of good teachers and the teaching that is needed in today’s and tomorrow’s schools. The focus is on research-based perspectives, with contributions from several internationally renowned scholars on what constitutes good and quality in teaching-studying-learning processes. The chapters focus on good teaching and good teachers from perspectives concerning the fundamental and transversal features of what constitutes a good teacher. More specifically, it is argued that good teachers in tomorrow’s schools will need capabilities that reflect the purpose of education, values in education, and talent in education.

As an outcome, the book provides insights into how, in attending not only to the cognitive but also to the affective, behavioral, moral and spiritual domains, teachers are able to support holistic growth and learning among their students in schools of the 21st century. This volume discusses good teaching for schools in the future from the perspectives of school pedagogy, educational psychology, and neuropsychology.
Access to and participation in education are critical issues in contemporary South Africa. Awareness of inclusiveness and equality is not recent, having possibly first been described in the dawn of the millennium by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). Drawing from the current framings in the SADC education systems the contributors argue that ICT has a key role to play in transformation, Africanisation and decolonisation of education.

Contributors are: Skye Adams, Najma Agherdien, Andrew Crouch, Andries Du Plessis, Nazira Hoosen, Katijah Khoza-Shangase, Mhulaheni Maguvhe, Khetsiwe Masuku, Sharon Moonsamy, Munyane Mophosho, Nomfundo Moroe, Ramashego Shila Mphahlele, Ndileleni Mudzielwana, Shonisani Mulovhedzi, Anniah Mupawose, Mapula Ngoepe, Moshe Phoshoko, Dhanashree Pillay, Roshni Pillay, Ben Sebothoma and Susan Thuketana.
Author: Alexis Kokkos
We live in a socio-cultural reality which is dominated by an entrepreneurial and instrumental rationality, as well as by a discriminative and populist mentality. Questioning the validity of taken-for-granted sovereign perspectives is thus of vital importance. Our contact with art can serve as a pathway through which we might be empowered to identify false life values and develop the disposition and ability to challenge them.

The learning potential of aesthetic experience is, however, barely exploited within educational systems. In addition, although major scholars have contributed to a deeper understanding of the liberating dimension of processing important artworks, there has been surprisingly little discussion in the relevant literature focusing on educational practice.

Exploring Art for Perspective Transformation provides a comprehensive analysis and synthesis of theoretical views pertaining to the emancipatory process of exploring art. Moreover, it presents the educational method Transformative Learning through Aesthetic Experience (TLAE), with reference to particular examples of implementation. TLAE is addressed to adult educators and school teachers regardless of the subject they teach and their theoretical background on aesthetics. It involves engaging learners in exploring works from fine arts, literature, theatre, cinema and music with a view to promoting critical reflection on one’s potentially problematic perspectives.
The Power of Autoethnographic Narratives in Education
Educational reality is weaved within stories, poems, and dialogues, as the author demonstrates his becoming of a transformative educator. Transformative learning is important for teachers to think about their practices, change their thinking, and share the stories of their experience for learners’ empowerment.

This is an autoethnographic account of the author's experience as a transformative and transforming educator that unfolds the ways he has used ethical dilemma story pedagogy to explore interpretative and creative spaces for transformative learning, both personally and with a group of trainee teachers who take the responsibility to facilitate students’ learning into a purposeful path. The ethical dilemma story pedagogy provides relatable scenarios to challenge and unsettle learners’ thought processes leading to acknowledgment of multiple viewpoints. Theorising Transformative Learning serves to help educators utilise the sociocultural contexts connected to students’ lives and experiences.
Volume Editors: Tarquam McKenna, Donna Moodie, and Pat Onesta
How should new knowledge systems for the academy be reflective of a 60,000-year-old Aboriginal histories? Indigenous Knowledges: Privileging Our Voices offers an answer to this question with generative and sometimes challenging narratives and addresses a unique higher education situation in Australia. At NIKERI Institute, Indigenous and Non-Indigenous academics engage in collaborative discipline-specific learning and teaching. In this collection of writings, these joint and sole authors find ways to present their world views to scholars, Indigenous communities and researchers alike. Knowledge systems and ways of knowing are made accessible in 10 chapters building on occasions of reflection as communities of practice positioned around Australia’s unique indigeneity as known at NIKERI. The notion of respectful encounter is at the heart of these chapters. Depth ecology, personal and collective narratives along with other ways to deliver research design and teacher education are considered through the lens of Indigenous Knowing in this unique community of academics at Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

In this chapter, the author presents a first-person, narrative vignettes of his experience as a transformative educator cum researcher for enhancing contextual student engagement. He sets out his ideas in chronological order as he explains the importance of his birthplace, home country, early school days, working life, culture, and university teaching as well as research trails. He also focuses on his narratives about life and learning as a financially and socially struggling student with his reflections on university teaching days and other significant events that have played a prime role in creating who he is today and who he seeks to become. He has brought his childhood experiences into account to see things more clearly with creative imagination and less inhibition. When he started to write about his experiences of, and connections to early life, he has tried to conceive of other worlds and others’ worlds by comparing ideas and feelings with a kind of childlike vision on his part of free-ranging curiosity and imagination. He has sought to employ this naive, open, child-mindedness as the foundation of his writing and find the freedom to imagine the world and the environment around him in all its immediacy and wonder. The aim is to make his stories accessible to the readers to highlight the power of life events and ideas as “the doorway for imagination” (, p. 16). Inspired by transformative learning theory, the author claims that each experience has opened new doors for him which also brought a deeper understanding of the worlds around him.

In: Theorising Transformative Learning
In: Theorising Transformative Learning

Abstract

In this chapter, the author describes the use of ethical dilemma story pedagogy as a teaching method in delivery of educational activities. As a trial of this pedagogy, he has presented two of his ethical dilemma stories as part of the research project to a group of trainee teachers, studying in rural Nepal. With his intention to allow them to make informed decisions about whether to participate in this study, he gave written information of the aims, procedures, and their roles in the research process to the participants. The participants came from different sociocultural and economic backgrounds. Van Maanen (, p. 49) asserts that “ethnography must present accounts and explanations by members of the culture of the events in their lives.” In many cultures worldwide, we often think in terms of metaphor, comparing two different things through their similarities or networks of analogies. The ethical dilemma stories that the author wrote for this research purpose were centred on metaphors relating to people’s lives and living. The result of this research suggests that active engagement enhances the sense of belonging to both teachers and students while also enabling meaningful student learning from their own sociocultural perspectives.

In: Theorising Transformative Learning

Abstract

This chapter illustrates the teacher/researcher’s role as a transformative learner, drawing on an engaging, meaningful, autoethnographic inquiry. The chapter starts with the theme of author’s personal reflection as a transformative learner. He has explained how the traditional ways of thinking about education and research have changed over the years, and encouraged him to see teaching and learning as a transformative process. The author has developed new understandings and insights within eight key conditions of transformative learning based on his experiences and those of his research collaborators. These elements range from connecting learning to students’ and teachers’ lives to encouraging critical reflection, analytic skills and empowerment.

In: Theorising Transformative Learning

Abstract

This introductory chapter sets the scene around transformative learning and the author’s transition towards ethical dilemma story pedagogy through autoethnographic experience. By drawing on an autoethnographic methodology, the author proposes for interactive classroom activities to promote students’ critical awareness. The purpose is to facilitate students’ inner understanding of reflective pedagogy principles through an in-depth, self-analytical understanding of educational practices. The use of self-reflective writing to promote improvement in pedagogic practice is expressed in a creative written form. By acknowledging the insights from research collaborators, and combining the findings from self-reflection, the intended objective of this study is to arrive at a clearer understanding of transformative practice seen from a variety of educational perspectives.

In: Theorising Transformative Learning