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Relevant Prose and Postscripts
Teachers are not automatons. An educator’s personal values, concerns, and aspirations cannot be cleaved from one’s professional life without impacting the quality and relevance of the teaching experience. This book examines spaces where the personal and professional intersect, thereby deepening our understanding of the nuances and complexities of a teacher’s work. It draws readers into places of vulnerability—moments of grieving. As a teacher’s curriculum—as a curriculum of life—grief has much to teach about sympathy, compassion, and resilience.

Educational philosophy, literary analysis, and reflective practice are used to explore ways grief can help us better ascertain the scope and depth of the educators we are and have the potential to become. Pieces of literature used include works by Pat Conroy, Charles Dickens, Stephen King, Rabindranath Tagore, Virgil, Franz Wedekind, and Virginia Woolf. Also included are ideas from a diverse set of educational philosophers, social and cultural commentators, poets, and more. Chapters conclude with "Topics for Reflection" for further individual and/or collective reflection and discourse.

Educators at all stages of their careers will benefit from this study that demonstrates the impact personal grieving can have on remembering, recovering, and reidentifying with one’s mission and vision. As a resource for pre-service or veteran teachers, the text celebrates the power of introspection to transform our work, our lives, and the lives of our students. It is equally relevant for parents, coaches, mentors, and anyone who takes on the kinds of teacher roles that impact, nourish, and inspire the lives of others.

Reconnecting School and Society
What should the relationship between school and society be? Obstinate Education: Reconnecting School and Society argues that education is not just there to give individuals, groups and societies what they want from it, but that education has a duty to resist. Education needs to be obstinate, not for the sake of being difficult, but in order to make sure that it can contribute to emancipation and democratisation. This requires that education always brings in the question whether what is desired from it is going to help with living life well, individually and collectively, on a planet that has a limited capacity for giving everything that is desired from it.

This book argues that education should not just be responsive but should keep its own responsibility; should not just focus on empowerment but also on emancipation; and, through this, should help students to become ‘world-wise.’ It argues that critical thinking and classroom philosophy should retain a political orientation and not be reduced to useful thinking skills, and shows the importance of hesitation in educational relationships. This text makes a strong case for the connection between education and democracy, both in the context of schools, colleges and universities and in the work of public pedagogy.
Philosophers of Technology Inspiring Technology Education
Reflections on Technology for Educational Practitioners analyzes the use of philosophy of technology in technology education and unpacks the concept of ‘reflective practitioners’ (Donald Schön) in the field. Philosophy of technology develops ideas and concepts that are valuable for technology education because they show the basic characteristics of technology that are important if technology education is to present a fair image of what technology is. Each chapter focuses on the oeuvre of one particular philosopher of which a description is given and then insights are offered about technology as developed by that philosopher and how it has been fruitful for technology education in all its aspects: motives for having it in the curriculum, goals for technology education, content of the curriculum, teaching strategies, knowledge types taught, ways of assessing, resources, educational research for technology education, amongst others.
Common Concepts for Contemporary Movements
Editor: Derek R. Ford
While education is an inherently political field and practice, and while the political struggles that radical philosophy takes up necessarily involve education, there remains much to be done at the intersection of education and radical philosophy. That so many intense political struggles today actually center educational processes and institutions makes this gap all the more pressing. Yet in order for this work to be done, we need to begin to establish common frameworks and languages in and with which to move.

Keywords in Radical Philosophy and Education takes up this crucial and urgent task. Dozens of emerging and leading activists, organizers, and scholars assemble a collective body of concepts to interrogate, provoke, and mobilize contemporary political, economic, and social struggles. This wide-ranging edited collection covers key and innovative philosophical and educational themes—from animals, sex, wind, and praxis, to studying, podcasting, debt, and students.

This field-defining work is a necessary resource for all activists and academics interested in exploring the latest conceptual contributions growing out of the intersection of social struggles and the university.

Contributors are: Rebecca Alexander, Barbara Applebaum, David Backer, Jesse Bazzul, Brian Becker, Jesse Benjamin, Matt Bernico, Elijah Blanton, Polina-Theopoula Chrysochou, Clayton Cooprider, Katie Crabtree, Noah De Lissovoy, Sandra Delgado, Dean Dettloff, Zeyad El Nabolsy, Derek R. Ford, Raúl Olmo Fregoso Bailón, Michelle Gautreaux, Salina Gray, Aashish Hemrajani, Caitlin Howlett, Khuram Hussain, Petar Jandrić, Colin Jenkins, Kelsey Dayle John, Lenore Kenny, Tyson E. Lewis, Curry Malott, Peter McLaren, Glenn Rikowski, Marelis Rivera, Alexa Schindel, Steven Singer, Ajit Singh, Nicole Snook, Devyn Springer, Sara Tolbert, Katherine Vroman, Anneliese Waalkes, Chris Widimaier, Savannah Jo Wilcek, David Wolken, Jason Wozniak, and Weili Zhao.
Teaching, Responsibility, and the Corruption of Youth explores the concept and practice of responsibility in education and teaching in the new post-Cold War era after the long run of globalization and liberal internationalism has been disrupted by the rise of populism, anti-immigration sentiments and new forms of terrorism. The old liberal values and forms of tolerance have been questioned. Responsibility is a complex concept in our lives with moral, social, financial and political aspects. It embraces both legal and moral forms, and refers to the state of being accountable or answerable for one’s actions implying a sense of obligation associated with being in a position of authority such as a parent, teacher or guardian having authority over children. First used with schools in 1855, the concept's legal meaning was only tested in the 1960s when student conduct, especially when materially affecting the rights of other students, was not considered immune by constitutional guarantees of freedom.

This volume investigates the questions left with us today: What does responsibility mean in the present era? Does loco parentis still hold? What of the rights of students? In what does teacher responsibility consist? Can student autonomy be reconciled with market accountability? To what extent can responsibility of or for students be linked to ‘care of the self’ and ‘care for others’? And, most importantly, to what extent, if any, can teachers be held accountable for the actions of their students?
Althusser for Educators
In the last decade, there has been an international resurgence of interest in the philosophy of Louis Althusser. New essays, journalism, collections, secondary literature, and even manuscripts by Althusser himself are emerging, speaking in fresh ways to audiences of theorists and activists. Althusser is especially important in educational thought, as he famously claimed that school is the most impactful ideological state apparatus in modern society. This insight inspired a generation of educational researchers, but Althusser’s philosophy—unique in a number of ways, one of which was its emphasis on education—largely lost popularity.

Despite this resurgence of interest, and while Althusser’s philosophy is important for educators and activists to know about, it remains difficult to understand. The Gold and the Dross: Althusser for Educators, with succinct prose and a creative organization, introduces readers to Althusser’s thinking. Intended for those who have never encountered Althusser’s theory before, and even those who are new to philosophy and critical theory in general, the book elaborates the basic tenets of Althusser’s philosophy using examples and personal stories juxtaposed with selected passages of Althusser’s writing. Starting with a beginner’s guide to interpellation and Althusser’s concept of ideology, the book continues by elaborating the epistemology and ontology Althusser produced, and concludes with his concepts of society and science. The Gold and the Dross makes Althusser’s philosophy more available to contemporary audiences of educators and activists.
A Post-Constructivist Perspective on Education, Learning, and Development
In this book, the author presents a major challenge to (social) constructivism, which has become an ideology that few dare to critique. Transgressing the boundaries of this ideology, the author develops an alternative epistemology that takes dwelling as the starting point and ground. Dwelling enables building and thinking (‘constructing’). It is an epistemology in which there is a primacy of social relations, which are the first instantiations of the higher psychological functions ascribed to humans. Starkly contrasting constructivism, the author shows how the commonness of the senses and the existence of social relations lead to common sense, which is the foundation of everything rational and scientific. Common sense, which comes from and with dwelling, is the ground in which all education is rooted. Any attempt to eradicate it literally uproots and thus alienates students from the life and world with which they are so familiar.
In Professionals’ Ethos and Education for Responsibility, Alfred Weinberger, Horst Biedermann, Jean-Luc Patry and Sieglinde Weyringer offer insights into different concepts and applications of professionals’ ethos focusing on teachers’ ethos. Ethos refers to the responsibility of a professional, and it is considered a key element of a professional’s work. The first time mentioned in ancient Greece denoting character and habit, the word ethos nowadays has several definitions and meanings. This book intends to explore the variety of meanings, with authors in this volume drawing from established concepts of ethos and empirical research to push the field forward.
Simón Rodríguez
A constant belief seems to give life to Kohan’s theoretical work and philosophical practice. A supposition that one could never prove, or disprove, motivates Kohan’s ceaseless erring and essaying, his efforts to invent school. We read it in-between the lines of nearly all of his published work, and those who have had the chance to take part in his manner of philosophical ask
An Examination of Innovation and Philosophical Denial
As the foundation of our modern world, innovation has generated a seemingly endless ocean of new products, new processes, new thoughts, and new ways of doing things. Every day, we enhance our innovation and its effects—and we advance, accomplish and constantly seek even more! Generally, we tend to live well based on our innovation outputs.
This suggests that we think we know what we are doing, and that we know where we are headed. We do know what we’re doing, don’t we? Most would say: yes, we do; indeed, we are inclined to be certain of it.
But, can we be certain about what we know about innovation?
To address this question, we search for evidence of any useful outputs of the work of philosophy. Such outputs should help us better understand if we can, indeed, be certain about what we do, and where we are going. Is there any evidence of this? Alas!—philosophy is nowhere to be found! As a tool of rigorous reflection and understanding, even where some of the most exciting and forward-looking innovation enterprise in science, engineering and organizational structuring takes place, philosophy seems to have vanished—if it was ever there in the first place.
Today, this seems somehow normal, and quite all right. But is it? Of course, we are aware that our history of philosophy illuminates the earlier pathways we once followed to achieve our modernity, and that is fine; but, where is philosophy and its work today? Where has philosophy gone?
In this book we explore these questions, and more: why is philosophy vanishing, or even entirely absent from our world today? What has happened? If, at one time, philosophy was so very important, why would it no longer be much in evidence, if it is there at all? Where is the work of philosophy today as we push forward with innovation in our astonishing, leading-edge realms? Do we really understand what we are doing? Do we have any idea where we are going? And, most chillingly, regardless of the answers—does it matter?
The claim is made in this book that the disappearance of philosophy does matter, and alarm bells ought to be ringing. Why? Because the work of philosophy, work we seem to have forgotten, is essential for us to know where we are going. If we are truly serious about surviving and thriving, especially by being so innovative in so many spectacular and challenging ways, we cannot afford to have philosophy and its works disappear and then be forgotten. Said plainly, we cannot deny and then lose the maps and compass of philosophy applied to the challenges of today and tomorrow. If we do, we lose any reason for any journey, anywhere. And, more broadly, we are in danger of losing reason generally.
To continue denying philosophy—and then, in the end, to deny that very denial—is a move with no hope of benefit. But, the lack of evidence for the work of philosophy indicates that move is underway. We are destroying any useful link between innovation and philosophy. In so doing, we are seriously reducing the value of innovation (no matter how wonderful we think it might be) while blindly forgetting the critical importance of philosophy and its work. This move will guarantee that the path to our future will be fraught with unnecessary hardship and difficulty, and then, if it is permanent, will deal a fatal blow.
If we truly wish to thrive and persevere, we are compelled to avoid the fatal error of philosophical denial. To do so, we must rediscover, revitalize and apply anew the rigorous work of philosophy to innovation in our modern era.