The contributors to Amplified Voices, Intersecting Identities: First-Gen PhDs Navigating Institutional Power overcame deeply unequal educational systems to become the first in their families to finish college. Now, they are among the 3% of first-generation undergraduate students to go on to graduate school, in spite of structural barriers that worked against them.

These scholars write of socialization to the professoriate through the complex lens of intersectional identities of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and social class.

These first-generation graduate students have crafted critical narratives of the structural obstacles within higher education that stand in the way of brilliant scholars who are poor and working-class, Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian, immigrant, queer, white, and women. They write of agency in creating defiant networks of support, of sustaining connections to family and communities, of their activism and advocacy on campus. They refuse to perpetuate the myths of meritocracy that reproduce the inequalities of higher education. In response to research literature and to campus programming that frames their identities around “need”, they write instead of agentive and politicized intersectional identities as first-generation graduate students, committed to institutional change through their research, teaching, and service.

Contributors are: Lamesha C. Brown, LaToya Brown, Altheria Caldera, Araceli Calderón, Marisa V. Cervantes, Joy Cobb, Raven K. Cokley, Francine R. Coston, Angela Gay, Josué R. López, Rebecca Morgan, Gloria A. Negrete-Lopez, Lisa S. Palacios, Takeshia Pierre, Alejandra I. Ramírez, Matt Reid, Ebony Russ, Jaye Sablan, Travis Smith, Phitsamay S. Uy, Jane A. Van Galen, Jason K. Wallace and Lin Wu.
First-Gen PhDs Navigating Institutional Power in Early Academic Careers
The contributors to Amplified Voices, Intersecting Identities: First-Gen PhDs Navigating Institutional Power in Early Careers overcame deeply unequal educational systems to become the first in their families to finish college. Now, they are among the 3% of first-generation undergraduate students to go on to graduate school and then become faculty, in spite of structural barriers that worked against them.

These scholars write of socialization to the professoriate through the complex lens of intersectional identities of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, ability and social class.

These first-generation graduate students have crafted critical narratives of the structural obstacles within higher education that stand in the way of brilliant scholars who are poor and working-class, Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian, immigrant, queer, white, women, or people with disabilities. They write of agency in creating defiant networks of support, of sustaining connections to family and communities, of their activism and advocacy on campus. They refuse to perpetuate the myths of meritocracy that reproduce the inequalities of higher education. In response to a research literature and to campus programming that frames their identities around “need”, they write instead of agentive and politicized intersectional identities as first-generation graduate students, committed to institutional change through their research, teaching, and service.

Contributors are: Veronica R. Barrios, Candis Bond, Beth Buyserie, Noralis Rodríguez Coss, Charise Paulette DeBerry, Janette Diaz, Alfred P. Flores, José García, Cynthia George, Shonda Goward, Luis Javier Pentón Herrera, Nataria T. Joseph, Castagna Lacet, Jennifer M. Longley, Catherine Ma, Esther Díaz Martín, Nadia Yolanda Alverez Mexia, T. Mark Montoya, Miranda Mosier, Michelle Parrinello-Cason, J. Michael Ryan, Adrián Arroyo Pérez, Will Porter, Jaye Sablan, Theresa Stewart-Ambo, Keisha Thompson, Ethan Trinh, Jane A. Van Galen and Wendy Champagnie Williams.
The chapters in Art as an Agent for Social Change, presented as snapshots, focus on exploring the power of drama, dance, visual arts, media, music, poetry and film as educative, artistic, imaginative, embodied and relational art forms that are agents of personal and societal change. A range of methods and ontological views are used by the authors in this unique contribution to scholarship, illustrating the comprehensive methodologies and theories that ground arts-based research in Canada, the US, Norway, India, Hong Kong and South Africa.

Weaving together a series of chapters (snapshots) under the themes of community building, collaboration and teaching and pedagogy, this book offers examples of how Art as an Agent for Social Change is of particular relevance for many different and often overlapping groups including community artists, K-university instructors, teachers, students, and arts-based educational researchers interested in using the arts to explore social justice in educative ways. This book provokes us to think critically and creatively about what really matters!
A Case of Social Justice
Author: R. P. Clair
Blood into Water: A Case of Social Justice is a novel that weaves together the past and the present, from Mayan legends to contemporary stories of corporate greed. The story connects a mother and son, Sofia and Miguel Rodríguez, to a corporate scheme of exploitation uncovered by reporter Caleb Barthes. Barthes is sent to Nicaragua on an investigative assignment to look into water privatization plans. He learns far more than he expects about the environmental, political, and cultural issues surrounding ‘water.’ Perhaps more importantly, he learns about postcolonial exploitation and his own complicity, as well as the loss that can follow, not only for himself, but others.

This novel, inspired by the Bolivian Water Wars, offers students a creative text dealing with an environmental issue that leads to a social movement. Anthropologists, archaeologists, historians, rhetoricians, sociologists, psychologists, political scientists, as well as scholars of business, organizational communication, interpersonal communication, cultural studies and environmental studies will easily find a place in the curriculum for this novel. It is both a stand-alone novel and a sequel to the popular novel, Zombie Seed and the Butterfly Blues: A Case of Social Justice.
International cooperation in higher education is not new, but gained new urgency in recent years with the expansion of the knowledge economy, the easy flow of communications and the emulation created by international rankings. In the European Union’s countries, international competition and the process of political and economic unification required national higher education institutions to give priority to international cooperation, while large countries such as Russia, China, Brazil and South Africa intensified their effort to modernize their institutions and link them to the international flow of science, technology and talent, leading similar trends in other countries in their regions. These global trends are shaped by the national culture and institutions of each country, and the existing national and international cooperation policies and instruments on all sides. In Building Higher Education Cooperation with the EU: Challenges and Opportunities from Four Continents, the authors look at how these interactions occur from the perspectives of the European Union and the countries involved and make recommendations on policies that could make international cooperation more fluid and beneficial to all parties involved.
30 Years of the UN Convention of the Rights of the Child in Action towards Sustainability
This book investigates and uncover paradoxes and ambivalences that are actualised when seeking to make the right choices in the best interests of the child. The 1989 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child established a milestone for the 20th century. Many of these ideas still stand, but time calls for new reflections, empirical descriptions and knowledge as provided in this book.

Special attention is directed to the conceptualisation of children and childhood cultures, the missing voices of infants and fragile children, as well as transformations during times of globalisation and change. All chapters contribute to understand and discuss aspects of societal demands and cultural conditions for modern-day children age 0–18, accompanied by pointers to their future.

Contributors are: Eli Kristin Aadland, Wenche Bjorbækmo, Elin Eriksen Ødegaard, Eldbjørg Fossgard, Ida Marie Lyså Hege Wergedahl, Susanne Højlund Petersen, Asle Holthe, Liisa Karlsson, Karen Klitgaard Povlsen, Jonatan Leer, Czarecah Oropilla, Anja Maria Pesch, Gro Rugseth, Jorunn Spord Borgen, Stinne Gunder Strøm Krogager, Liv Torunn Grindheim, Kristin Vindhol Evensen, Pauline von Bonsdorff and Susanne C. Ylönen.
Multilingual Immigrants in the United States
This edited book is a beautiful and powerful collection of poems and personal and visual narratives of multilingual immigrants in the United States. The purpose of this book is to create a space where immigrant stories can be told from their personal perspectives. The contributors are immigrants from all walks of life who represent a diverse picture of languages, professions, and beliefs from the immigrant diasporas within the United States. Inspired by the use of autoethnography, authors examine their own lives through poems and personal and visual narratives to share with others who might have similar experiences.

Contributors are: Fatmeh Alalawneh, Bashar Al Hariri, Rajwan Alshareefy, Ana Bautista, May F. Chung, Zurisaray Espinosa, Manuel De Jesús Gómez Portillo, Jamie Harris, Ben Haseen, Lydiah Kananu Kiramba, Babak Khoshnevisan, Sharada Krishnamurthy, Judith Landeros, Jiyoon Lee, Pablo Montes, Aracelis Nieves, Gloria Park, Mauricio Patrón Rivera, Luis Javier Pentón Herrera, Tairan Qiu, R. Joseph Rodríguez, Geovanny Vicente Romero, Cristina Sánchez-Martín, Sandy Tadeo, Gabriel Teodoro Acevedo Velázquez, Polina Vinogradova, and Ethan Tính Trịnh.
Theory, Development, Instruction, and Assessment
The Partnership for 21st Century Skills states that critical thinking encompasses skills that students and professionals will need to succeed in their careers, school, and life. The demand for critical thinkers will increase in the future to meet the demands of world-wide problems. Educators need to show students how to eliminate errors, such as biases in their reasoning, and to be effective decision makers. To do this, teachers and leaders in schools and businesses need to provide an atmosphere conducive to developing critical thinking skills and dispositions.

Meeting this challenge is the goal of the chapters collected in Critical Thinking and Reasoning. This book begins with experts laying out their best current understanding of the skills and attitudes critical thinking requires. Next, the relationship between critical thinking and the psychology of development and learning is explored to understand better how to develop critical thinkers from childhood to adulthood.

But how can we best teach for critical thinking? How can we incorporate into the classroom the challenges presented in the workplace? This book provides several extensive examples of current practices from the elementary level through the secondary level to the university level of how to stimulate critical thinking skills and dispositions.
The genealogy of racism dates back to 610 AD when Islamic jihadists invented whiteness as a religious justification for deracinating and enslaving African people out of East African and into Southeastern Europe for more than 1,300 years.

Through a new interdisciplinary research methodology, Ancestorology, a taxonomy of Western cultural and visual productions of history are juxtaposed with the social stratifications of the African Diaspora to arrive at a new interpretation of the historical narrative.

Decolonizing Arts-Based Methodologies: Researching the African Diaspora provokes critical analytical thought between the historical narrative and current public discourse in Western societies where people of African descent exist. The importance of this work begins the process of unlearning Western ways of knowing and seeing through hegemonic productions of knowledge and by assigning new values to humanity’s collective memory.
International Educationalist Perspectives
Editor: Brent Bradford
The Doctoral Journey: International Educationalist Perspectives assembles a collective narrative related to the doctoral journey of recent graduates in the field of education. Clearly, the doctoral journey is not a linear process but rather a lattice of ever-evolving professional and personal relationships, experiences, perspectives, and insights.

From early on when considering whether or not to apply to a programme, to deciding on an institution and supervisor, to delving into the related literature, to data collection and analyses, to closing in on the defence, to results dissemination, and everything in between and beyond, the doctoral journey presents incalculable obstacles that can be, and have been, overcome by doctoral graduates—including the contributors in this inspirationally-sparked collective narrative.

Contributors are: Trudy Cardinal, Philip Wing Keung Chan, José da Costa, Alison Egan, Janet McConaghy, June McConaghy, Kelsey McEntyre, Sammy M. Mutisya, Christina A. Parker, Carla L. Peck, Colin G. Pennington, Kathleen Pithouse-Morgan, Edgar Schmidt, and Pearl Subban.