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Abstract

How should a cluster be designed to foster the innovativeness of its members? In this article, we view self-aware and organised clusters as “meta-organisations” which can deliberately shape their internal structures through design-based interventions. To formulate interventions for cluster design fostering its innovativeness, we adopt a methodology combining a systematic literature review and a design-oriented synthesis. We distinguish between six cluster business model elements: actors and their roles, resources and capabilities, value flows, governance, value propositions and value-creating activities. To gain insight into the properties of these elements conducive to cluster innovativeness, we review literature at the intersection of cluster, meta-organisation, business model and innovation studies. Our study allows to consolidate the extant research into “organised” clustering and the drivers of the cluster actors’ innovativeness. It also helps identify several important unanswered questions in the literature and to suggest potentially fruitful directions for further work.

In: Triple Helix

Abstract

Scholars have highlighted the need for a clearer knowledge, conceptualization and theorizing on the practicality of integrating arts entrepreneurship education in university programs. The objective of this study is to identify the themes in the Arts Entrepreneurship (AE) and to develop these themes to a conceptual model that describes the Arts Entrepreneurship Education (AEE). This research article fills the existing gap in the literature on the AEE through the research question: What are the key themes in AEE, and how can these themes be linked to the conceptual development of the AEE literature? This study argues that if entrepreneurship is to be viewed as a fundamental part of AEE, teachers need to have proper knowledge of the importance and inclusion in the University’s art subject curriculum. The findings identified pertinent themes, subthemes and trends several scholars have worked on finding the best practices to promote the development of AEE.

In: Triple Helix

Abstract

The article links upgrading in the global value chains with the triple helix concept by focusing on business-academia collaborations that played a part in firms’ capacity to upgrade. Both are crucial for Central Eastern European countries, which face the need to restructure their economies and escape the “middle income trap”. The article asks the following research question: how can public policy encourage business-academia collaboration or other types of activities that contribute to firm upgrading? Data on four different case studies in Lithuania is analysed to answer this question. Results indicate that building endogenous technological capacity through a variety of business-university collaboration types is needed to attract higher-value foreign direct investment and facilitate intersectoral and functional global value chain upgrading. Furthermore, besides research and development, educating and training the labour force are likely to be even more poweful drivers for business-academia collaboration in Central and Eastern Europe.

In: Triple Helix
Author: Yiming Qin

Abstract

In early 2020, almost all schools were closed in China due to the Covid-19 pandemic. This article offers a snapshot of China’s improvisational approaches of online learning adopted shortly after the outbreak of Covid-19 in the early 2020 with a system-wide policy of “No Lesson Suspended”. It captures three major approaches of online learning in the context of such a policy. It is also concluded that online learning has resulted in varied outcomes for students, teachers and parents, which play profound and multidimensional roles in educational equality and quality. Additionally, several hidden challenges are identified for critical reflections on the improvement of online education in the future.

In: Beijing International Review of Education
In: The Jewish Struggle in the 21st Century

Abstract

Ecological Civilization (EC) represents a constituted effort on the part of China to utilize its developing regional linkages to promote a form of globalization that places the bioeconomy as a foundational core of sustainable global development. This article first outlines how China, through a unique form of state-centric globalization-through-regionalism, has continued to develop cooperative networks based on global trade, infrastructure, and educational exchanges. Second, signaling a fundamental shift within the higher education (HE) landscape, we outline that the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), and its ever-increasing number of open and inclusive university partnerships, represents a rich avenue for people-to-people exchange within a third-space for scientific collaboration. Third, within both a shifting HE landscape (and the scholarly push to engage with a new postdigital scientific/philosophical paradigm) China’s pursuit of EC constitutes a form of biodigitalism which conceptualizes the bioeconomy as a pursuit of technological advancement that preserves and strengthens humanity’s intimate relationship with the natural world. Finally, we argue that building a BRI-ESD community undergirded by the biodigital ecopedagogy of EC will provide both the curriculum and educational space to more fully enact UNESCO’s ESD 2030 framework.

In: Beijing International Review of Education
In: Beijing International Review of Education
In: Beijing International Review of Education
In: The Jewish Struggle in the 21st Century
Author: Xiaoying Jiang

Abstract

This is a systematic literature review of the internationalization of higher education in the context of the Belt and Road Initiative (bri). Following the systematic literature review methods, the author selected eight English and 29 Chinese studies in the academic databases. Through an inductive thematic analysis, the author synthesized five primary themes: (a) philosophical and theoretical foundations of bri education; (b) introduction of higher education development in bri countries; (c) higher education cooperation between China and bri countries; (d) international higher education and economic development; and (e) international student education management. The goal of this review is to underline new opportunities and challenges of bri education discussed within the literature and to present how the research can inform scholars, practitioners, and policymakers in the field of international higher education. It called for more joint research among Chinese scholars and overseas scholars in bri countries. In terms of the future research direction, the author suggested more research on the theoretical exploration and empirical investigation in international higher education within the context of bri.

In: Beijing International Review of Education