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The Narrative of Mathematics Teachers

Elementary School Mathematics Teachers’ Features of Education, Knowledge, Teaching and Personality

Edited by Dorit Patkin and Avikam Gazit

The issue of mathematics teaching and its impact on learners' attainments in this subject has continuously been on the public agenda. The anthology of chapters in this book consists of varied up-to-date studies of some of the best mathematics education researchers and mathematics teaching experts, exploring the varied aspects of this essential. The book depicts the elementary school mathematics teachers' world while relating to three aspects which comprise the professional environment of mathematics teachers: Teachers' education and teachers' knowledge, Teaching and Teachers' personality. The chapters are written on a level which addresses and might interest a wide readership: researchers, in-service teachers, pre-service teachers, parents and learners.

Edited by Jinfa Cai, Gabriele Kaiser, Bob Perry and Ngai-Ying Wong

What is effective mathematics teaching? This book represents the first purposeful cross-cultural collection of studies to answer this question from teachers’ perspectives. It focuses particularly on how teachers view effective teaching of mathematics. Teachers’ voices are heard and celebrated throughout the studies reported in this volume. These studies are drawn from many parts of the world representing both Eastern and Western cultural traditions. The editors and authors have deliberately included the views of teachers and educators from different cultural backgrounds, taking into account that beliefs on effective mathematics teaching and its features are highly influenced by one’s own culture.
The book will provide readers and scholars with the stimulus to take the ideas presented and expand on them in ways that help improve mathematics education for children, teachers and researchers in both the East and the West.

Rina Zazkis and Peter Liljedahl

This book presents storytelling in mathematics as a medium for creating a classroom in which mathematics is appreciated, understood, and enjoyed. The authors demonstrate how students’ mathematical activity can be engaged via storytelling. Readers are introduced to many mathematical stories of different kinds, such as stories that provide a frame or a background to mathematical problems, stories that deeply intertwine with the content, and stories that explain concepts or ideas. Moreover, the authors present a framework for creating new stories, ideas for using and enriching existing stories, as well as several techniques for storytelling that make telling more interactive and more appealing to the learner. This book is of interest for those who teach mathematics, or teach teachers to teach mathematics. It may be of interest to those who like stories or like mathematics, or those who dislike either mathematics or stories, but are ready to reconsider their position.

Children Learn Mathematics

A Learning-Teaching Trajectory with Intermediate Attainment Targets for Calculation with Whole Numbers in Primary School

Series:

Edited by Marja van den Heuvel-Panhuizen

Improving the quality of education is an important endeavor of educational policy and TAL aims to contribute to this. TAL is a project initiated by the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Sciences, and carried out by the Freudenthal Institute (FI) of Utrecht University and the Dutch National Institute for Curriculum Development (SLO), in collaboration with the Rotterdam Center for Educational Services (CED). The quality of education can be improved in many ways. TAL proposes to do this by providing insights into the broad outline of the learning-teaching process and its internal coherence. It aims to be a support for teachers alongside mathematics textbook series. Furthermore, TAL can provide extra support for teachers if it is incorporated into a circle of implementation.
The TAL project aims to describe the intermediate attainment targets of primary school mathematics.
These objectives represent a further development of, and a supplement to, the previously established core goals for the end of primary school. A defining feature of the intermediate attainment targets is that they are embedded in a learning-teaching trajectory. This is also the reason for calling the project TAL, which in Dutch stands for Tussendoelen Annex Leerlijnen; in English this means Intermediate Attainment Targets in Learning-Teaching Trajectories. The middle letter of TAL can also be considered as referring to Afbeeldingen (Representations). This term indicates that the trajectory description contains many examples of students’ and teachers’ behavior, which form an integral part of the learning-teaching trajectory. Eventually, learning-teaching trajectory descriptions will
be developed for all domains of primary school mathematics.
The present book contains the learning-teaching trajectory for the domain of whole number calculation. The book contains of one trajectory for the lower grades (kindergarten 1 and 2, and grades 1 and 2) and one for the upper grades of primary school (grades 3, 4, 5 and 6). This means that the book covers the learning process in this domain for children ranging from 4 to 12 years of age.

Fractions, Percentages, Decimals and Proportions

A Learning-Teaching Trajectory for Grade 4, 5 and 6

Series:

Frans van Galen, Els Feijs, Nisa Figueiredo, Koeno Gravemeijer, Els van Herpen and Ronald Keijzer

This book describes the field of fractions, percentages, decimals and proportions. It shows the relations between these topics, and how they can be taught in a way that emphasizes these relations.
The book also describes the need for change in the way we teach mathematics. The authors argue for a shift in emphasis from “acquired skill” to “understanding”. First and foremost, students should grasp the underlying concepts. Placing less high demands on the skill level of students in the use of formal procedures can set free time that can be invested in in-depth understanding.

The Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Volume 4

The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional

Series:

Edited by Barbara Jaworski and Terry Wood

The Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education, the first of its kind, addresses the learning of mathematics teachers at all levels of schooling to teach mathematics, and the provision of activity and programmes in which this learning can take place. It consists of four volumes.
Volume 4 of this handbook has the title The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. The volume seeks to complement the other three volumes by focusing on knowledge and roles of teacher educators working with teachers in teacher education processes and practices. In this respect it is unique. Chapter authors represent a community of teacher educators world wide who can speak from practical, professional and theoretical viewpoints about what it means to promote teacher education practice.
The volume is in 3 main sections. In the first we focus on Challenges to and Theory in Mathematics Teacher Education. Here authors write from perspectives of theory and/or challenge and relate this to examples and insights from their practice. The second section, Reflection On Developing as a Mathematics Teacher Educator has four autobiographical chapters in which authors delineate their experiences as teacher educators and relate these to theoretical and/or moral standpoints. In Section 3, Working With Prospective and Practising Teachers: What We Learn; What We Come to Know, authors write from perspectives on practice—in many cases, the practices in which they themselves have engaged—and relate this to theoretical perspectives and rationales for teacher education programmes.
The volume also has an introductory chapter in which the purpose and content of the volume is set out, and a final chapter that syntheses themes and issues from the chapters as a whole, offering an overview of the field and suggesting future directions.
Bibliographical Information for the complete set:
VOLUME 1:
Knowledge and Beliefs in Mathematics Teaching and Teaching Development
Peter Sullivan, Monash University, Clayton, Australia and Terry Wood, Purdue University, West Lafayette, USA (eds. )
paperback: 978-90-8790-541-5, hardback: 978-90-8790-542-2, ebook: 978-90-8790-543-9
VOLUME 2:
Tools and Processes in Mathematics Teacher Education
Dina Tirosh, Tel Aviv University, Israel and Terry Wood, Purdue University, West Lafayette, USA (eds. )
paperback: 978-90-8790-544-6, hardback: 978-90-8790-545-3, ebook: 978-90-8790-546-0
VOLUME 3:
Participants in Mathematics Teacher Education: Individuals, Teams, Communities and Networks
Konrad Krainer, University of Klagenfurt, Austria and Terry Wood, Purdue University, West Lafayette, USA (eds. )
paperback: 978-90-8790-547-7, hardback: 978-90-8790-548-4, ebook: 978-90-8790-549-1
VOLUME 4:
The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional
Barbara Jaworski, Loughborough University, UK and Terry Wood, Purdue University, West Lafayette, USA (eds. )
paperback: 978-90-8790-550-7, hardback: 978-90-8790-551-4, ebook: 978-90-8790-552-1

How should I know?

Preservice Teachers' Images of Knowing (by Heart ) in Mathematics and Science

Series:

Kathleen T. Nolan

Elementary preservice teachers’school experiences of mathematics and science have shaped their images of knowing, including what counts as knowledge and what it means to know (in) mathematics and science. In this book, preservice teachers’ voices challenge the hegemony of official everyday narratives relating to these images.
The book is written as a parody of a physical science textbook on the topic of light, presenting a kaleidoscope of elementary preservice teachers’ narratives of knowing (in) mathematics and science. These narratives are tied together by the metaphorical thread of the properties of light, but also held apart by the tensions and contradictions with/in such a critical epistemological exploration. Through a postmodern lens, the only grand narrative that could be imag(in)ed for this text is one in which the personal lived experience narratives of the participants mingle and interweave to create a sort of kaleidoscope of narratives. With each turn of a kaleidoscope, light’s reflection engenders new patterns and emergent designs. The narratives of this research text highlight patterns of exclusion, gendered messages, binary oppositions, and the particle nature and shadowy texture of knowing (in) mathematics and science. The presentation format of the book emphasizes the reflexive and polyphonic nature of the research design, illustrated through layers of spoken text with/in performative text with/in metaphorical text.
The metaphor of a kaleidoscope is an empowering possibility for a critical narrative written to both engage and provoke the reader into imag(in)ing a critical journey toward possibilities for a different “knowing by heart” in mathematics and science and for appreciating lived experience narratives with/in teacher education.

Theorems in School

From History, Epistemology and Cognition to Classroom Practice

Series:

Edited by Paulo Boero

During the last decade, a revaluation of proof and proving within mathematics curricula was recommended; great emphasis was put on the need of developing proof-related skills since the beginning of primary school.
This book, addressing mathematics educators, teacher-trainers and teachers, is published as a contribution to the endeavour of renewing the teaching of proof (and theorems) on the basis of historical-epistemological, cognitive and didactical considerations. Authors come from eight countries and different research traditions: this fact offers a broad scientific and cultural perspective.
In this book, the historical and epistemological dimensions are dealt with by authors who look at specific research results in the history and epistemology of mathematics with an eye to crucial issues related to educational choices. Two papers deal with the relationships between curriculum choices concerning proof (and the related implicit or explicit epistemological assumptions and historical traditions) in two different school systems, and the teaching and learning of proof there.
The cognitive dimension is important in order to avoid that the didactical choices do not fit the needs and the potentialities of learners. Our choice was to firstly deal with the features of reasoning related to proof, mainly concerning the relationships between argumentation and proof.
The second part of this book concentrates on some crucial cognitive and didactical aspects of the development of proof from the early approach in primary school, to high school and university. We will show how suitable didactical proposals within appropriate educational contexts can match the great (yet, underestimated!) young students’ potentialities in approaching theorems and theories.

Edited by Ángel Gutiérrez and Paulo Boero

"This volume is a compilation of the research produced by the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) since its creation, 30 years ago. It has been written to become an essential reference for Mathematics Education research in the coming years.
The chapters offer summaries and synthesis of the research produced by the PME Group, presented to let the readers grasp the evolution of paradigms, questions, methodologies and most relevant research results during the last 30 years. They also include extensive lists of references. Beyond this, the chapters raise the main current research questions and suggest directions for future research.
The handbook is divided into five sections devoted to the main research domains of interest to the PME Group. The first three sections summarize cognitively oriented research on learning and teaching specific content areas, transversal areas, and based on technology rich environments. The fourth section is devoted to the research on social, affective, cultural and cognitive aspects of Mathematics Education. Finally, the fifth section includes two chapters summarizing the PME research on teacher training and professional life of mathematics teachers.
The volume is the result of the effort of 30 authors and 26 reviewers. Most of them are recognized leading PME researchers with great expertise on the topic of their chapter. This handbook shall be of interest to both experienced researchers and doctoral students needing detailed synthesis of the advances and future directions of research in Mathematics Education, and also to mathematics teacher trainers who need to have a comprehensive reference as background for their courses on Mathematics Education.

Making Connections

Comparing Mathematics Classrooms Around the World

Series:

Edited by David Clarke, Jonas Emanuelsson, Eva Jablonka and Ida Ah Chee Mok

In this book, comparisons are made between the practices of classrooms in a variety of different school systems around the world. The abiding challenge for classroom research is the realization of structure in diversity. The structure in this case takes the form of patterns of participation: regularities in the social practices of mathematics classrooms. The expansion of our field of view to include international rather than just local classrooms increases the diversity and heightens the challenge of the search for structure, while increasing the significance of any structures, once found. In particular, this book reports on the use of ‘lesson events’ as an entry point for the analysis of lesson structure. International research offers opportunities to study settings and characteristics untenable in the researcher’s local situation. Importantly, international comparative studies can reveal possibilities for practice that would go unrecognized within the established norms of educational practice of one country or one culture. Our capacity to conceive of alternatives to our current practice is constrained by deep-rooted assumptions, reflecting cultural and societal values that we lack the perspective to question. The comparisons made possible by international research facilitate our identification and interrogation of these assumptions. Such interrogation opens up possibilities for innovation that might not otherwise be identified, expanding the repertoire of mathematics teachers internationally, and providing the basis for theory development.