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Author: Alexis Kokkos
We live in a socio-cultural reality which is dominated by an entrepreneurial and instrumental rationality, as well as by a discriminative and populist mentality. Questioning the validity of taken-for-granted sovereign perspectives is thus of vital importance. Our contact with art can serve as a pathway through which we might be empowered to identify false life values and develop the disposition and ability to challenge them.

The learning potential of aesthetic experience is, however, barely exploited within educational systems. In addition, although major scholars have contributed to a deeper understanding of the liberating dimension of processing important artworks, there has been surprisingly little discussion in the relevant literature focusing on educational practice.

Exploring Art for Perspective Transformation provides a comprehensive analysis and synthesis of theoretical views pertaining to the emancipatory process of exploring art. Moreover, it presents the educational method Transformative Learning through Aesthetic Experience (TLAE), with reference to particular examples of implementation. TLAE is addressed to adult educators and school teachers regardless of the subject they teach and their theoretical background on aesthetics. It involves engaging learners in exploring works from fine arts, literature, theatre, cinema and music with a view to promoting critical reflection on one’s potentially problematic perspectives.
A Guidebook of Practices, Claims, Issues, and Implications
In this volume, the author offers an exploratory analysis of the history of homeschooling in the United States, current curricular practices, religious and political rationales for homeschooling, a critique of the claims by homeschooling advocates that the practice leads to greater efficiency and effectiveness, and what homeschooling and individualistic-oriented approaches mean for society.

Teaching the next generation at home is, with little doubt, the oldest form of educating children. Yet, this simplistic understanding of “homeschooling” does not adequately capture the growth of homeschooling as a practice in the 21st century nor is it a widely accessible form of “school choice” for most families. While many parents keep their children out of formal schooling – public and private – for myriad reasons, what is clear is that homeschooling is the epitome of a conceiving of education as an individualistic good – a commodity – that can, or should, be done outside of a conception of the common good, a reasonable understanding of teaching as a profession, and the elevation of ideological echo chambers of information which can have deleterious impacts on the students who are homeschooled and society, broadly.
Curriculum studies is at the core of the educational endeavour and informs what happens in every educational institution. As a result of its criticality or primacy, every educational practitioner appears to claim expertise in curriculum matters and what direction the field should take. In Africa, the curriculum practitioner has been given little or no space to theorise and orient the future of the field in Africa. Instead, European, and American curriculum theorisers have been allowed to exert a marked influence on the nature and direction of African theoretical and philosophical underpinnings. This situation raises fundamental questions about the future of education in Africa and this volume explores and answers these questions relating to curriculum theory, theorising and the theoriser by breaking traditions and experimenting on alternative approaches and pathways.

Contributors are: Aruna Ankiah-Gangadeen, Lynn Biggs, Eunice Champion, Taryn Isaacs De Vega, Kehdinga George Fomunyam, Nadaraj Govender, Angela James, Simon Bheki Khoza, NomaChina Kubashe, Nehemiah Latolla, Jacqui Lück, Dumisa Celumusa Mabuza, Simeon Maile, Suriamurthee Maistry, Makhulu A. Makumane, Emily Ndlovu Mangwaya, Zvisinei Moyo, Cedric Bheki Mpungose, Pascal Nadal, Blanche Ntombizodwa Ndlovu, Chris Ndlovu, Nellie Ngcongo-James, Dee (Deirdre) Pratt, Mukhtar Raban, Nolundi Radana, Makhosazana Edith Shoba, Mahlapahlapana Themane, Molaodi Tshelane, and Denise Zinn.
This book focuses on reflective writing, guiding teachers to recognize their potential as professional leaders. The shift to online and blended learning models now favored in education encourages a broader understanding of leadership, particularly its growing relevance to teachers. These models, combined with reflective writing, foster flexible, inclusive teacher learning that responds to each teacher’s strengths, can be used individually and collaboratively to develop teachers as leaders inside and outside the classroom who are critically involved in creating their own professional learning environments. The authors examine leadership in a global range of teaching contexts, each chapter raising diverse issues for teachers aspiring to be leaders in this post-COVID world.
Volume Editors: Denise Bentrovato and Johan Wassermann
Emerging from the pioneering work of the African Association for History Education (AHE-Afrika), Teaching African History in Schools offers an original Africa-centred contribution to international history education research. Edited by AHE-Afrika’s founders and directors, the volume thus addresses a notable gap in this field by showcasing otherwise marginalised scholarship from and about Africa.

Teaching African History in Schools constitutes a unique collection of nine empirical studies, interrogating curriculum and textbook contents, and teachers’ and learners’ voices and experiences as they relate to teaching and learning African history across the continent and beyond. Case studies include South Africa, Kenya, Rwanda, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Cameroon and Tanzania, as well as the UK and Canada.

Contributors are: Denise Bentrovato, Carol Bertram, Jean-Leonard Buhigiro, Annie Fatsereni Chiponda, Raymond Nkwenti Fru, Marshall Tamuka Maposa, Abdul Mohamud, Sabrina Moisan, Reville Nussey, Nancy Rushohora, Johan Wassermann, and Robin Whitburn.
Volume Editors: Kenneth Tobin and Konstantinos Alexakos
Doing Authentic Inquiry to Improve Learning and Teaching consists of 18 chapters, and 19 authors from 4 countries. The book is suited for use by educators, researchers and classroom practitioners involved in teaching and learning, teacher education, and policy. All chapters are grounded in urban contexts, but are broadly applicable. Multilogical research highlights uses of sociocultural theory, authentic, event-oriented, interpretive inquiry, narrative, and willingness to learn from difference. Methodologies are historically constituted, emergent, contingent, and participatory, embracing collaborative, and contemplative practices, and value of many voices and diverse meaning systems. Readers experience research that is potentially both personally and professionally transformative and applicable to today’s challenges.

Contributors are: Jennifer D. Adams, Konstantinos Alexakos, Arnau Amat, Marissa E. Bellino, Mitch Bleier, Corinna Yolanda Brathwaite, Olga Calderon, Katelin Corbett, Amy DeFelice, Gene Fellner, Helen Kwah, Manny Lopez, Anna Malyukova, Kate E. O'Hara, Malgorzata Powietrzyńska, Isabel Sellas, Kenneth Tobin, and Yau Yan Wong.
The chapters in Art as an Agent for Social Change, presented as snapshots, focus on exploring the power of drama, dance, visual arts, media, music, poetry and film as educative, artistic, imaginative, embodied and relational art forms that are agents of personal and societal change. A range of methods and ontological views are used by the authors in this unique contribution to scholarship, illustrating the comprehensive methodologies and theories that ground arts-based research in Canada, the US, Norway, India, Hong Kong and South Africa.

Weaving together a series of chapters (snapshots) under the themes of community building, collaboration and teaching and pedagogy, this book offers examples of how Art as an Agent for Social Change is of particular relevance for many different and often overlapping groups including community artists, K-university instructors, teachers, students, and arts-based educational researchers interested in using the arts to explore social justice in educative ways. This book provokes us to think critically and creatively about what really matters!
Theory, Development, Instruction, and Assessment
The Partnership for 21st Century Skills states that critical thinking encompasses skills that students and professionals will need to succeed in their careers, school, and life. The demand for critical thinkers will increase in the future to meet the demands of world-wide problems. Educators need to show students how to eliminate errors, such as biases in their reasoning, and to be effective decision makers. To do this, teachers and leaders in schools and businesses need to provide an atmosphere conducive to developing critical thinking skills and dispositions.

Meeting this challenge is the goal of the chapters collected in Critical Thinking and Reasoning. This book begins with experts laying out their best current understanding of the skills and attitudes critical thinking requires. Next, the relationship between critical thinking and the psychology of development and learning is explored to understand better how to develop critical thinkers from childhood to adulthood.

But how can we best teach for critical thinking? How can we incorporate into the classroom the challenges presented in the workplace? This book provides several extensive examples of current practices from the elementary level through the secondary level to the university level of how to stimulate critical thinking skills and dispositions.
Overarching principles of human rights which shore up a nearly 30-year history of international efforts to develop educational systems that are responsive to the needs of all. Arguably the most widely recognised international inclusive education policy, the Salamanca Statement released in 1994 from the United Nations Education, Science and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO), recognised that every child has a basic right to education.

In so doing, however, it drew a line around special needs as a particular emphasis, in globalising efforts towards equal opportunity through decrees for first principles of universally attainable privileges. Considered a watershed moment in global responses to educational exclusion, the Salamanca Statement was core to increasing awareness among nations of the need for fostering more inclusive education policy and practice. Nonetheless, the liberal ideologies that frame human rights in inclusive education are seldom called into question, despite perpetual marginalisation and disadvantage post Salamanca.

Inclusive Education Is a Right, Right? brings the many together to consider educational democracy at a moment in global history where the political order fractures populations, and the displacement of socio-economic participation is displayed in every news bulletin – true, fake or otherwise. Under these conditions, the significance of academic activism, wherein diverse perspectives, methodologies and theoretical approaches are put to work to increase equity in education, has perhaps never been so stark. Across the collection the combined chapters engage with researchers, students, education professionals and leaders, advocacy organisations, and people experiencing exclusion and consider human rights in relation to inclusive education.

Contributors are: Kate Anderson, Alison Baker, Tim Corcoran, Edwin Creely, Jenny Duke, Peng-Sim Eng, Leechin Heng, Anna Kilderry, Sarah Lambert, Bec Marland, Julianne Moss, Philippa Moylan, Mia Nosrat, Joanne O’Mara, Jo Raphael, Bethany Rice, Andrew Riordan, Amathullah Shakeeb, Roger Slee, Kitty te Riele, Matthew K. E. Thomas, Peter Walker, Scott Welsh, Ben Whitburn, Julie White and Michalinos Zembylas.
The educational world is experiencing exciting yet tension-filled times. We all wish to strengthen and support creativity and creative teaching in schools. Yet recent debates about what “creativity” means, and how it should be implemented, raise the need for more specific approaches. Write a Science Opera (WASO) is one such approach. WASO is a transdisciplinary, inquiry-based approach to teaching at the intersection of art and science in schools. It is all about creative teaching and teaching for creativity.

Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guidebook to Writing a Science Opera provides teachers with the reasons for, and advantages of, introducing pupils of all ages to WASO. It provides step-by-step instructions for how to implement WASO in classrooms. WASO is challenging, but the rewards are powerful: In WASO, it is the pupils’ curiosity and creative imagination which develop their science and art curriculum.

Get ready for an exciting, creative journey …