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Tina Besley and Michael A. Peters

Teaching, Responsibility, and the Corruption of Youth explores the concept and practice of responsibility in education and teaching in the new post-Cold War era after the long run of globalization and liberal internationalism has been disrupted by the rise of populism, anti-immigration sentiments and new forms of terrorism. The old liberal values and forms of tolerance have been questioned. Responsibility is a complex concept in our lives with moral, social, financial and political aspects. It embraces both legal and moral forms, and refers to the state of being accountable or answerable for one’s actions implying a sense of obligation associated with being in a position of authority such as a parent, teacher or guardian having authority over children. First used with schools in 1855, the concept's legal meaning was only tested in the 1960s when student conduct, especially when materially affecting the rights of other students, was not considered immune by constitutional guarantees of freedom. This volume investigates the questions left with us today: What does responsibility mean in the present era? Does loco parentis still hold? What of the rights of students? In what does teacher responsibility consist? Can student autonomy be reconciled with market accountability? To what extent can responsibility of or for students be linked to ‘care of the self’ and ‘care for others’? And, most importantly, to what extent, if any, can teachers be held accountable for the actions of their students?
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The Negotiated Self

Employing Reflexive Inquiry to Explore Teacher Identity

Teacher identity resides in the foundational beliefs and assumptions educators have about teaching and learning. These beliefs and assumptions develop both inside and outside of the classroom, blurring the lines between the professional and the personal. Examining the development of teacher identity at this intersection requires a unique reflexive capacity.

Reflexive inquiry is both established and continually emerging. At its most basic, reflexivity refers to researchers’ consciousness of their role in and effect on both the act of doing research and arriving at research findings. In making central the role of the researcher in the research process, reflexive inquiry interrogates agency while examining philosophical notions about the nature of knowledge.

While advancements have been made in investigating the relationship between teacher knowledge and teacher practice, the research often fails to connect this meaning with self-knowledge and issues of identity. Through a consideration of these tenets, the authors in this collection embrace critical, qualitative, creative, and arts-integrated approaches to examine ways that reflexive inquiry supports studies in teacher identity. Moving between theory and lived experience, the authors individually and collectively lay bare teacher identity as negotiated while evidencing the epistemological merits of reflexive inquiry.
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Exploring Pedagogic Frailty and Resilience

Case Studies of Academic Narrative

Exploring Pedagogic Frailty and Resilience presents the practical application of the frailty model to demonstrate how it may be used to support the professional development of university teachers. Case studies from colleagues representing a diverse variety of disciplines illustrate how the development of a reflective narrative can be initiated and framed through the use of concept map-mediated interviews. The emerging accounts share a common structure to facilitate comparison across academic disciplines.

Chapters are written by academic leaders – colleagues who are recognised as excellent teachers within their disciplines and whose voices will be acknowledged as offering authentic commentary on the current state of university teaching. These commentaries offer a unique resource for other academics who may be tempted to reflect on their teaching in a scholarly manner, or to university managers and academic developers who want to explore the detail that lies beneath broad surveys of teaching quality and investigate the factors that can either support the development of teaching or impede its progress.

This collection of narratives drawn from a single institution will resonate with the experiences of teachers in higher education more broadly through areas of common interest and regions of generalisability that can be explored to inform professional development of university teachers in other institutional and national contexts.

“Concept mapping and the pedagogic frailty model form a powerful combination to drive reflection upon professional development, which is critical to respond rapidly to changes in the higher education system. This book is a must-read for any academic who wishes to become a resilient teacher.” – Paulo Correia, Professor, University of São Paulo, Brazil

“Increasing pedagogic frailty is one of the biggest risks for academic quality in universities. This book gives a systematic, compact and research-based view about contemporary issues related to university teaching. It helped me to see the problems in my own university, and more importantly, it gave me ideas for solving them. I recommend this book to everybody who is involved in teaching at universities - from novice teachers to professors, administrators and senior managers.” – Priit Reiska, Professor, Tallinn University, Estonia
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Critical Issues and Bold Visions for Science Education contains 16 chapters written by 32 authors from 11 countries. The book is intended for a broad audience of teachers, teacher educators, researchers, and policymakers. Interesting perspectives, challenging problems, and fresh solutions grounded in cutting edge theory and research are presented, interrogated, elaborated and, while retaining complexity, offer transformative visions within a context of political tensions, historical legacies, and grand challenges associated with Anthropocene (e.g., sustainability, climate change, mass extinctions).

Within overarching sociocultural frameworks, authors address diverse critical issues using rich theoretical frameworks and methodologies suited to research today and a necessity to make a difference while ensuring that all participants benefit from research and high standards of ethical conduct. The focus of education is broad, encompassing teaching, learning and curriculum in pre-k-12 schools, museums and other informal institutions, community gardens, and cheeseworld. Teaching and learning are considered for a wide range of ages, languages, and nationalities. An important stance that permeates the book is that research is an activity from which all participants learn, benefit, and transform personal and community practices. Transformation is an integral part of research in science education.

Contributors are: Jennifer Adams, Arnau Amat, Lucy Avraamidou, Marcília Elis Barcellos, Alberto Bellocchi, Mitch Bleier, Lynn A. Bryan, Helen Douglass, Colin Hennessy Elliott, Alejandro J. Gallard Martínez, Elisabeth Gonçalves de Souza, Da Yeon Kang, Shakhnoza Kayumova, Shruti Krishnamoorthy, Ralph Levinson, Sonya N. Martin, Jordan McKenzie, Kathy Mills, Catherine Milne, Ashley Morton, Masakata Ogawa, Rebecca Olson, Roger Patulny, Chantal Pouliot, Leah D. Pride, Anton Puvirajah, S. Lizette Ramos de Robles, Kathryn Scantlebury, Glauco S. F. da Silva, Michael Tan, Kenneth Tobin, and Geeta Verma.
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Through the Fire: From Intake to Credential

Teacher Candidates Share Their Experiences through Narrative

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Cleveland Hayes, Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, Hillary B. Eisworth and Kimberly White-Smith

By applying an auto-ethnographic approach in this volume to share and explore the experiences of prospective teachers as they navigate the preparation and credentialing processes of teacher education, we – as those who have gone before the future educators in this text and those who will come behind them, gain first hand insights from these young women and men about what it means and how to better prepare prospective educators to become a teacher against a backdrop of historical inequities in schooling and prepared for the multi-culturally diverse classrooms of today. Teacher educators, school and community leaders, and others committed to pushing toward more equitable social domains and forms of living and learning hence would do well to take up the opportunity provided in this text to learn from the narratives included in this volume and those of other teacher candidates; indeed, the narratives of teacher candidates herein and elsewhere are, in part, reflections of ourselves as teacher educators and evaluations of our work in teacher education and the professional preparation of those who will carry on our professions after us and for rising generations. What we as teacher educators teach, or think we are teaching, in teacher preparation courses may, or may not, be what prospective teachers are learning about being a teacher and successful teaching and learning for all learners, particularly those students historically underserved.

Each of the prospective educators who share their narratives in this volume are striving to become critical educators capable of promoting equitable educational and social opportunities, outcomes, and experiences for all learners. While their journeys are each distinctive and unique to them personally, the teacher candidates who share their narratives in this volume highlight some of the challenges and opportunities they have encountered in teacher preparation courses to learn about the functioning of social structures that sustain society’s existing hierarchies and develop the skills and knowledge requisite to identify, implement, and assess critical learning strategies aimed at challenging inequities and promoting more inclusive forms of education. Specifically, these future teachers included in this volume are sharing with us, their readers, their attempts at learning to unhook from Whiteness and to disrupt the pernicious and historical school-to-prison pipeline that has long existed in the US between the nation’s prison system and schools serving learners and their families and communities identified as racially not White, economically poor, and otherwise not members of the White, middle-class, primary English speaking, heterosexual, patriarchal mainstream.
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Living a Motivated Life

A Memoir and Activities

Raymond J. Wlodkowski

What if, as psychologists and adult educators advocate, a person chose a life where his motivation for the work itself determined what he did? Living a Motivated Life: A Memoir and Activities follows the author through forty years, revealing how he selected vocational pursuits guided by his understanding of intrinsic motivation and transformative learning. As a compass for relevant decisions, these ideas gave energy and purpose to how he lived, and an instinct as sure as sight for the future.

Written with nuance, humor, and unpredictability, this story renders how he came to appreciate learning for the pleasure of learning. Facing similar challenges as those of today’s first generation college students, the memoir narrates his unexpected college enrollment, his friendship with an ancient history professor, and his triumphs and travails as teacher, psychologist, human relations specialist, psychotherapist, and adult educator.

This is the first memoir of someone who consciously chose to lead a professional life to experience flow on a daily basis. It is an important step in the integration and evolution of intrinsic motivation theory and transformative learning. But it reaches beyond this outcome, humanely sharing how the author aspired simply to be more, as adults hope to be everywhere.

The second part of this book provides an overview of intrinsic motivation and transformation theory. It offers activities for teaching adults how to use techniques of storytelling and memoir to increase their agency for making intrinsic motivation and transformation productive ways to determine their future.
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We live in a time of educational transformations towards more 21st century pedagogies and learning. In the digital age children and young people need to learn critical thinking, creativity and innovation and the ability to solve complex problems and challenges. Traditional pedagogies are in crisis and many pupils experience school as both boring and irrelevant. As a response educators and researchers need to engage in transforming education through the invention of new designs in and for learning. This book explores how games can provide new ideas and new designs for future education. Computer games have become hugely popular and engaging, but as is apparent in this book, games are not magical solutions to making education more engaging, fun and relevant.

Making change in educational practices calls for participatory projects where researchers, designers and teachers work together to create innovative new learning spaces in schools. Through empirical research, innovative theoretical frameworks and new context sensitive design models this book opens up for creating new pathways for education for the future. With contributions from Scandinavian researchers continuing a strong tradition of participatory approaches to research and practice, the book also communicates the importance of education as a means for creating equal opportunities for all.

Games and Education explores new designs in and for learning and offer inspiration to teachers, technologist and researchers interested in changing educational practices. Highlighting the translation of theory into practice, this book also provides more realistic experiences and models of how games can facilitate learning in school.

Contributors are: Hans Christian Arnseth, Jeppe Bundsgaard, Pernille Toftgaard Christensen, Caroline Cruaud, Filipa de Sousa, Thomas Duus Henriksen, Victor Lim Fei, Uno Fors, Simon Skov Fougt, Thorkild Hanghøj, Lise Busk Kofoed, Carsten Jessen, Jari Jessen, Morten Misfeldt, Johanna Öberg, Kristine Øygardslia, Robert Ramberg, Lars Reng, Henrik Schoenau-Fog, Staffan Selander, Kenneth Silseth, Olga Timcenko, Charlotte Lærke Weitze, and Mats Wiklund.
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At a time when universities demand immediate and quantifiable impact of researchers’ scholarship, the voice of research participants becomes tertiary behind impact factors and the volume of research produced. Moreover, what counts as research within the academy constrains practices and methods that may best articulate the phenomenon being studied. When external forces constrain methodological practices, research innovation slows and.

This book aims to address the methodological, interpretive, ethical/procedural challenges and tensions within theatre-based research with a goal of improving our field’s research practice and quality. Each chapter embraces various methodologies, research methods, positionalities and examples of mediation by inviting two or more leading researchers in their field who interrogated each other’s work and, in so doing, highlighted current debates and practices in the field of theatre-based research. Topics include: ethics, method, audience, purpose, mediation, form, aesthetics, voice, data generation, and research participants. Each chapter frames a critical dialogue between researchers that may take multiple forms, (dialogic interlude, research conversation, dramatic narrative, duologue, poetic exchange, etc.).

Drama Research Methods fills a gap in the field in that it is the first theatre-based research book to provide a rigorous critique of the research genre. Some of the field’s leading researchers will also administer self-critiques of their and their co-author’s work. They will focus on the innovative use of drama/theatre research methods in ever-widening contexts and for a broad range of purposes and outcomes both within and outside of the arts and the challenges this poses for researchers, writers and research participants.

Contributors are: Vivien Aitken, Allison Anders, George Belliveau, Selina Busby, Helen Cahill, Diane Conrad, Peter Duffy, Lynn Fels, Kelly Freebody, Kathleen Gallagher, Janinka Greenwood, Anne Harris, Brad Haseman, Christine Hatton, Brian S. Heap, Yasmine Kandil, Joe Norris, John O’Toole, Robin Pascoe, Jo Raphael, Nisha Sajnani, Richard Sallis, Joe Salvatore, Emma Selwyn, Christine Sinclair, Liselle Terret, and Peter Wright.
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In Belonging: Rethinking Inclusive Practices to Support Well-Being and Identity, issues related to inclusive education and belonging across a range of education contexts from early childhood to tertiary education are examined and matters related to participation, policy and theory, and identity and well-being are explored. Individual chapters, which are drawn from papers presented at The Inclusive Education Summit held at the University of Canterbury, 2016, canvass a variety of topics including issues related to pedagogy, sexuality, theory, policy and practice from a range of different author perspectives as practitioners, academics and lay-persons. and also from the perspective of different international contexts including New Zealand, South Africa and Australia.

Contributors are: Keith Ballard, Hera Cook, Michael Gaffney, Gwen Gilmore, Annie Guerin, Fiona Henderson, Leechin Heng, Kate McAnelly, Trish McMenamin, Be Pannell, Christine Rietveld, Marie Turner, Scott Welsh, Ben Whitburn, Julie White, and Melanie Wong.
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Another Way

Decentralization, Democratization and the Global Politics of Community-Based Schooling

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The case studies compiled in Another Way: Decentralization, Democratization and the Global Politics of Community-Based Schooling offer a comparative look at how global processes of educational decentralization have both helped and hindered the development of community-based schools in local-level settings across Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas. Drawing on a variety of methodological and theoretical perspectives, the diverse chapters combine to reveal that while increased decentralization is often perceived as essential to assuring robust levels of democratization, community participation and social justice in education, decentralization is also often experienced as a mechanism of austerity, privatization and segregation.