Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for :

  • Teacher Education x
  • Professional Development x
  • Brill | Sense x
  • Status (Books): Published x
  • Status (Books): Out Of Print x
Clear All
Study Research Methodologies for Teacher Educators is a comprehensive text that delineates a range of research methodologies. This edited volume, with many chapters written by self-study scholars who are noted in the field for particular methodological and epistemological perspectives, helps fill the gap in the literature on self-study research methods. It provides readers with an opportunity to examine various methodologies which will not only help them deepen their understanding of research but also, will allow them to select one that best suits their needs. Both new and experienced researchers will find this text valuable. We consider Self-Study Research Methodologies for Teacher Educators a valuable contribution to the field of teacher education.
Aims, Modules, Evaluation
Within the central topics of the debate on teachers’ professionalism are the problems of research-based and evidence-based initial and lifelong teacher behavior. Although the statements on professional similarities of teacher actions with those of other (academic) professionals are very plausible, there remains a central task for teacher education programs: How to develop towards such expertise—which is equal to evidence convictions—effectively and efficiently. Which role do scientific research and its results play in this context? How can research results be converted into recommendations for teacher actions?
The contributions to this book focus on central problems of the conversion process: In the first part the goal dimension is treated: Maiello & Oser emphasize the relationship of central variables of teacher behaviour as identity, professional satisfaction or self-efficacy to teachers’ professional behaviour; Blömeke, Felbrich & Müller discuss the role of future teachers’ beliefs on the nature of mathematics; Stevenson uses cultural historical activity theory to work out cognitive schemas that can be targeted in vocational teacher education; Gruber tackles the problem of how vocational teachers can be supported to become experts by discussing especially four major possible research strategies.
The second part of this book is dedicated to possible intervention approaches by which the gap of theory and practice shall be bridged. Steiner & Steiner report on critical learning incidents which heavily influence the micro-processes which characterize teachers’ instructional measures; Winther differentiates the trait and state perspective of motivation with regard to their consequences for the learning process; Boekaerts focuses on aspects of collaborative learning; Weber sharpens her deliberations explicitly to a design experiment on the problem of initiating intercultural learning.
The third part of this book is a report of the use and the consequences of Oser’s model of teaching standards. Baer, Dörr, Fraefel, Kocher, Kiester, Larcher, Müller, Sempert & Wyss show results of a large study on the development of teacher competences run in Switzerland and Germany. The study observes the competence development of prospective teachers from the beginning of their teaching training up to the job entry phase. This book is published under the auspices of the Swiss Federal Office for Professional Education and Technology.
Editor: Bill Green
Understanding and researching professional practice is crucial both to enhancing the quality of professional learning and to improving professional education more generally. Yet professional practice remains something that is little known, theoretically and philosophically, despite a longstanding interest in what might be called the meta-field of professional practice, learning and education.
The contributors to this book, drawn from fields such as education, allied health, psychology and business, explore different aspects of practice in the professions, professionalism, and research. This includes engaging with the burgeoning literature on practice theory and philosophy, including the increasingly influential neo-Aristotelian tradition, and taking account of growing interest in practice thinking across contemporary scholarship. It considers issues such as the primacy of practice, the nature of professional judgement, the role of ‘experience’, ethics, context, and the practitioner standpoint. As such, it raises important and timely questions about practice ontologies, epistemologies and methodologies, and also praxis and politics. This is especially needed in a context otherwise increasingly organised by neoliberalism, economic rationality, anxious managerialism, and what some see as a general drive towards de-professionalisation and new nuances and intensities of regulation.
Writing Qualitative Research on Practice brings together key authors in the field of qualitative research to critique current trends and expand discourse about the challenges and practices of writing qualitative research. This book is located in the context of professional practice and the practice world. It scopes and maps the broad horizons of qualitative research on practice and explores writing in major qualitative research traditions. A key issue addressed in writing qualitative research, particularly the narrative forms, is finding a way to write that encapsulates the goals and genre of the research project. Writing is presented as a process and journey and also a way of thinking and creating knowledge. Within research, writing is an essential expression of the research frame of reference and a key element of the research genre. This book explores writing for a range of publications including books, chapters, theses and papers for journals. The practical and accessible style of this book makes it an invaluable resource for postgraduate research students, teachers and supervisors and scholars of qualitative research.
Investigating the Teacher’s Life and Work attempts to bring together the methodological and substantive aspects of studying the teacher’s life and work. Some of the chapters in the book provide a “how to do” approach for those wishing to study the teacher’s life and work employing a life history method; whilst other chapters provide the kind of substantive and generic findings which might be anticipated when conducting life history work.
The focus on professional life and work has been growing rapidly in the last two or three decades. There are a number of reasons for this. Firstly there is a methodological impulse; many new studies are adopting a life history approach. The life history tradition aims to understand the interface between people’s life and their work. It also seeks to explore the historical context and the socio-political circumstances in which people’s life and work is located.
A further major reason for investigating the teacher’s life and work at the moment is the huge range of restructuring initiatives taking place throughout the educational world. There is a kind of ‘world movement’ to restructure education and health—certainly in most Western countries. Generally this takes the form of the introduction of the three T’s—targets, tests and tables—and the increasing accountability and performativity regimes associated with these new forms of evaluation.
Significantly these initiatives have been introduced at governmental level in most countries with the minimum of consultation with teacher workforces. As a result there is growing evidence of a clash between professional life and work missions and the restructuring initiatives which aim to transform these missions. Perhaps the best way to explore this increasingly acute clash of values is through the investigation of professional life and work.
Investigating the Teacher’s Life and Work aims to bring together the methodological and substantive approaches and to show how this kind of study can increase our understanding of the interface between government intentions and teacher’s beliefs and motives.
Knowledge, Beliefs, and Identity in Mathematics Teaching and Teaching Development (Second Edition)
This second edition of the International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education builds on and extends the topics/ideas in the first edition while maintaining the themes for each of the volumes. Collectively, the authors looked back beyond and within the last 10 years to establish the state-of-the-art and continuing and new trends in mathematics teacher and mathematics teacher educator education, and looked forward regarding possible avenues for teachers, teacher educators, researchers, and policy makers to consider to enhance and/or further investigate mathematics teacher and teacher educator learning and practice, in particular. The volume editors provide introductions to each volume that highlight the subthemes used to group related chapters, which offer meaningful lenses to see important connections within and across chapters. Readers can also use these subthemes to make connections across the four volumes, which, although presented separately, include topics that have relevance across them since they are all situated in the common focus regarding mathematics teachers.

Volume 1, Knowledge, Beliefs, and Identity in Mathematics Teaching and Teaching Development, edited by Despina Potari and Olive Chapman, examines teacher knowledge, beliefs, identity, practice and relationships among them. These important aspects of mathematics teacher education continue to be the focus of extensive research and policy debate globally. Thus, as the first volume in the series, it appropriately addresses central topics/issues that provide an excellent beginning to engage in the field of mathematics education through the handbook.

Contributors are: Jill Adler, Mike Askew, Maria Bartolini Bussi, Anne Bennison, Kim Beswick, Olive Chapman, Charalambos Charalambus, Helen Chick, Marta Civil, Sandra Crespo, Sean Delaney, Silvia Funghi, Merrilyn Goos, Roberta Hunter, Barbara Jaworski, Kim Koh, Esther S. Levenson, Yeping Li, Niamh O’ Meara, JoengSuk Pang, Randolph Phillipp, Despina Potari, Craig Pournara, Stephen Quirke, Alessandro Ramploud, Tim Rowland, John (Zig) Siegfried, Naiqing Song, Konstantinos Stouraitis, Eva Thanheiser, Collen Vale, Hamsa Venkat, and Huirong Zhang.
Tools and Processes in Mathematics Teacher Education (Second Edition)
This second edition of the International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education builds on and extends the topics/ideas in the first edition while maintaining the themes for each of the volumes. Collectively, the authors look back beyond and within the last 10 years to establish the state-of-the-art and continuing and new trends in mathematics teacher and mathematics teacher educator education, and look forward regarding possible avenues for teachers, teacher educators, researchers, and policy makers to consider to enhance and/or further investigate mathematics teacher and teacher educator learning and practice, in particular. The volume editors provide introductions to each volume that highlight the subthemes used to group related chapters, which offer meaningful lenses to see important connections within and across chapters. Readers can also use these subthemes to make connections across the four volumes, which, although presented separately, include topics that have relevance across them since they are all situated in the common focus regarding mathematics teachers.

Volume 2, Tools and Processes in Mathematics Teacher Education, describes and analyze various promising tools and processes, from different perspectives, aimed at facilitating the mathematics teacher learning and development. It provides insights of how mathematics teacher educators think about and approach their work with teachers. Thus, as the second volume in the series, it broadens our understanding of the mathematics teacher and their learning and teaching.
Participants in Mathematics Teacher Education (Second Edition)
This second edition of the International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education builds on and extends the topics/ideas in the first edition while maintaining the themes for each of the volumes. Collectively, the authors looked back beyond and within the last 10 years to establish the state-of-the-art and continuing and new trends in mathematics teacher and mathematics teacher educator education, and looked forward regarding possible avenues for teachers, teacher educators, researchers, and policy makers to consider to enhance and/or further investigate mathematics teacher and teacher educator learning and practice, in particular. The volume editors provide introductions to each volume that highlight the subthemes used to group related chapters, which offer meaningful lenses to see important connections within and across chapters. Readers can also use these subthemes to make connections across the four volumes, which, although presented separately, include topics that have relevance across them since they are all situated in the common focus regarding mathematics teachers.

Volume 3, Participants in Mathematics Teacher Education, focuses not only on prospective and practicing teachers as learners but also on school colleagues, teacher educators, researchers, and others who work to provide effective learning opportunities for teachers. The emphasis is on describing and analysing participants’ engagement in mathematics teacher education collaborations and contexts from various perspectives. Thus, as the third volume in the series, it further broadens our understanding of the development of mathematics teachers.