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Mary Ginsberg

Revolutionary art generally means propaganda – art with a political message that is intended to motivate or persuade. However, propaganda is not just a sinister manipulation, as connoted in the West since the early twentieth century.

In revolutionary and wartime societies, propaganda is considered a vital part of education and political participation. Propaganda encourages or condemns; reinforces existing attitudes and behaviour; and promotes social membership within nation, class or work unit.

Drawing on the British Museum’s wide-ranging collection, this book provides a fascinating contextual survey of political art across Asia, covering the period from about 1900 to 1976. The author explores themes such as propaganda in daily life; heroes and villains; the use of the past; symbolism; dissent; women and children; and revolutionary inspirations. Over 100
works of art from China, Japan, Vietnam, Korea, India and other countries are featured. Here are posters, prints, cartoons, calligraphy, ceramics, papercuts, textiles, panels and badges – powerful images designed to move hearts and minds.

This title is only available through Hotei Publishing in the United States of America, Canada and the Philippines.
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The Beauty of Silence

Japanese Nō and Nature Prints by Tsukioka Kōgyo (1869-1927)

Robert Schaap and J. Thomas Rimer


The Beauty of Silence. Japanese Nō and Nature Prints by Tsukioka Kōgyo (1867-1927) is the first monograph in English on Tsukioka Kōgyo, one of the lesser-known exponents of Japanese woodblock prints of the Meiji period (1868-1912). This publication exposes Kōgyo’s life and work, presenting a detailed and abundantly-illustrated overview of his rich oeuvre of prints and paintings, and places them in the context of his times. For the first time, Kōgyo’s life and work are accessible to readers throughout the world.
Kōgyo is particularly well-known for his many depictions of the Nō, Japan’s elegant and poetic theatrical form, dating back to medieval times. Performances of Nō continue to have wide audiences even today, with admirers not only in Japan, but throughout Asia, Europe and the United States.
Kōgyo often created unusual images of the theatrical productions he attended, and his prints provide fascinating visual clues and insights into how these classic plays were actually performed during his lifetime. In these theatrical prints, Kōgyo created images of an evocative beauty that are comparable with the work of some of the great artists in the European tradition who also recorded the theatrical practices of their times.
The Beauty of Silence illustrates a range of Kōgyo’s works on a variety of subjects, including landscapes, as well as samples of his art created in other media. The publication includes his biography, historical information on the Nō, a detailed analysis of the prints, and useful information on each of the Nō plays pictured. The appendices section includes listings of more than a hundred artist-seals used by Kōgyo, an index of Nō plays and illustrations of all 120 prints belonging to Kōgyo’s famous print series Nōgaku hyakuban (One Hundred Nō Plays).
This book, with almost 400 full color illustrations, will be of wide interest both to lovers of woodblock prints and to those interested in the power and beauty of Japan’s theatrical traditions.
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Births and Rebirths in Japanese Art

Essays Celebrating the Inauguration of The Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures

Edited by Nicole Coolidge Rousmaniere

This volume brings together five essays by prominent scholars of Japanese studies, each taking up a central topic in Japanese cultural history. Based on a series of lectures marking the inauguration of the Sainsbury Institute in Norwich and London, each essay introduces in concise and readable form subjects that the authors have worked on as part of larger publishing projects. Written or translated specifically for this collection, each author has distilled their views on an aspect of their research that relates to an important artistic, cultural, or intellectual 'birth' or 'rebirth' in Japanese history. Medieval Zen concepts of the transmigration of the soul are explored in Helmut Brinker's discussion of death poems and commemorative portraits of Zen priests. Tsuji Nobuo, moving back and forth between ancient and modern times, tests the tenability of arguments that contemporary enthusiasm for manga and anime in Japan can be seen as a revival of modes of viewing images established as far back as the twelfth century. Focussing on Western influence on Japan during early modern times, Timon Screech analyses controversies over curative practices that occurred in eighteenth-century Japan as symptoms of a struggle over ideological positions that impregnated medical concerns. The final two essays discuss the modern age, with Donald Keene exploring the biography of the individual who occupied the throne during the Meiji Restoration of 1868 and John Rosenfield showing how Nihonga fits into a broader cultural movement motivated by the desire to preserve a national cultural identity.
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A Brush With Animals [hardback]

Japanese Paintings 1700-1950

Robert Schaap

Japan has a long and rich tradition of using animal imagery in works of art. A Brush with Animals. Japanese Painting 1700-1950 gives an overview of Japanese animal painting, covering some 250 years, with an emphasis on works by artists of the naturalistic Shijô School. It illustrates the wonderful variety of animals that figure in Japanese iconography, including the 12 animals of the zodiac and many mythological creatures. The reader is thus taken on a tour through the animal kingdom, which is profusely illustrated with no less than 300 colour images. A selection of essays explains in great detail the stories and legends behind the animal imagery and provides background information on the practical aspects and social context of Japanese hanging scroll paintings. A useful tool for the collector and a delight for anyone sensitive to the beauty of Japanese art.
A Brush with Animals was selected from collections of members of the Society for Japanese Arts (private and museum collections), to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Society. Many of the paintings are published here for the first time.
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A Brush With Animals [paperback]

Japanese Paintings 1700-1950

Robert Schaap

Japan has a long and rich tradition of using animal imagery in works of art. A Brush with Animals. Japanese Painting 1700-1950 gives an overview of Japanese animal painting, covering some 250 years, with an emphasis on works by artists of the naturalistic Shijô School. It illustrates the wonderful variety of animals that figure in Japanese iconography, including the 12 animals of the zodiac and many mythological creatures. The reader is thus taken on a tour through the animal kingdom, which is profusely illustrated with no less than 300 colour images. A selection of essays explains in great detail the stories and legends behind the animal imagery and provides background information on the practical aspects and social context of Japanese hanging scroll paintings. A useful tool for the collector and a delight for anyone sensitive to the beauty of Japanese art.
A Brush with Animals was selected from collections of members of the Society for Japanese Arts (private and museum collections), to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Society. Many of the paintings are published here for the first time.
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Henri Kerlen

An overview of Japanese illustrated books in public Dutch collections with detailed descriptions of nearly 2000 titles and extensive indices.
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Chikanobu

Modernity and Nostalgia in Japanese Prints

Bruce Coats

Chikanobu. Modernity and Nostalgia in Japanese Prints is the first monograph in English on the Meiji print artist Yōshū Chikanobu (1838-1912), well known for his depictions of women and scenes of Japanese history and legends. Author Bruce A. Coats presents a detailed overview of Chikanobu’s life and works, placed within the historical and artistic context of Meiji Japan, when its rapid modernization and westernization created an interest for ‘old’ Japan among the Japanese and when the arts underwent significant changes as well.
Essays by Bruce A. Coats, Allen Hockley, Kyoko Kurita and Joshua Mostow draw upon various topics related to Chikanobu’s work, such as Meiji literature and the heroic ethos in the late Meiji period.
Works donated to the Scripps College collection form the core of the illustrative material. The images are accompanied by elaborate descriptions and in a number of cases compared with similar designs from other artists. Two of Chikanobu’s well known series of 50 prints each, Snow, Moon, Flowers ( Setsugekka) and Eastern Brocades: Day and Night Compared ( Azuma nishiki chūya kurabe) are illustrated in their entirety. And with over 270 full color illustrations, Chikanobu. Modernity and Nostalgia in Japanese Prints truly displays the richness of the intense Meiji print palette.
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Edited by Amy Reigle Newland

Volume 2 of Hotei Academic European Studies on Japan is a compilation of essays covering subjects relating to the artistic environment of the artists and the economic considerations of Japanese print production. The essays are extended versions of the lectures presented at the First International Conference on Ukiyo-e, organized by Hotei Publishing. Contributions by Chris Uhlenbeck, David Waterhouse, Roger Keyes, Shigeru Oikawa, Asano Shugo, Timothy Clark, John Carpenter, Timon Screech, Matthi Forrer, Ellis Tinios and Philip Meredith.
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Competition and Collaboration

Japanese Prints of the Utagawa School

Joan Mueller

The prolific Utagawa school is one of the most famous lineages of print artists in the history of Japanese woodblock prints. It was founded by Utagawa Toyoharu during the second half of the eighteenth century and remained active in Edo, present-day Tokyo, throughout the nineteenth century. During this period, Utagawa-school artists dominated virtually every genre of ukiyo-e prints, or “pictures of the floating world,” including pictures of beautiful women, prints of kabuki actors, warrior prints, erotica, and landscape pictures. Colorful, technically innovative, and sometimes defiant of government regulations, these prints documented for a popular audience the pleasures of urban life, leisure, and travel. The diverse works by Utagawa Kunisada, Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Utagawa Hiroshige, and others reflected the changing social, economic, and political conditions present during the closing century of the Edo period (1615-1868) and early years of the Meiji period (1868-1912).
This 232-page groundbreaking catalogue features full-color images of more than 200 prints from the renowned Van Vleck Collection of Japanese Prints at the Chazen Museum of Art, University of Wisconsin–Madison. This collection – a number of which were once part of Frank Lloyd Wright’s personal collection of Japanese prints – is particularly noteworthy for its strong holdings of landscape prints including rare designs incorporating western perspective by the school’s founder Toyoharu. The book includes explicated entries for each work, artist biographies, and five scholarly essays about Japanese print culture and the Utagawa school.
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Edited by Institut de Tokyo

During the last twenty years of his life, the art dealer Tadamasa Hayashi (1853-1906) received an important and impassioned correspondence from around the world. Through these letters the friend of many artists, collectors and intellectuals, and the specialist in Japanese art and connoisseur of Western art, reveals himself to us. These letters allow us to determine the fundamental role played by Tadamasa Hayashi in the West and in Japan.
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A courtesan's day in the carefree atmosphere of the famous pleasure quarter the Yoshiwara in Edo (present-day Tokyo) was carefully planned to an hourly schedule. This sequence of 12 and later 24 hours proved a convenient device for Japanese print artists and their publishers when devising sets of prints showing favourite beauties of the day engaged in daily activities.
In this second volume of Hotei Publishing's Famous Japanese Prints Series, three sets centred on the theme of the hours of the clock in the pleasure quarters are discussed in detail:
• Kitagawa Utamaro's The Twelve Hours of the 'Green Houses' ( Seirō jūnitoki, c. 1794)
• Tsukioka Yoshitoshi's Twenty-four Hours in Shinbashi and Yanagibashi ( Shinryū nijūyoji, 1880-81)
• Toyohara Kunichika's Scenes of the Twenty-four Hours, A Prictorial Trope ( Mitate chūya nijūyoji, 1890-91)
A contextual and visual analysis of these works by the authors provides the reader with an insight into the broader cultural and artistic milieu of the early and later nineteenth century.
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Crows, Cranes & Camellias

The Natural World of Ohara Koson 1877-1945

Amy Reigle Newland, Jan Perrée and Robert Schaap

The work of print artist Ohara Koson (1877-1945) mainly consists of prints of birds and flowers, characterised by their peaceful charm. This book about Koson is the first Western publication of his oeuvre of prints and paintings. It provides all known information on the artist's life and work, his teachers and publishers, facsimiles of his signatures and seals and illustrations of an estimated seventy-five percent of his total print output, now kept in the splendid collection of Japanese prints in the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. First published in 2001, this new edition features an additional chapter on Koson’s oeuvre and designs which have been discovered since the original publication of Crows, Cranes and Camellias. This title is the definitive reference book for Koson collectors. The 1st edition with ISBN 9789074822381 is now out of stock.
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Dismissed as elegant fossils

Konoe Nobutada and the role of aristocrats in Early Modern Japan

Lee Bruschke-Johnson

Konoe Nobutada (1565-1614) was a famous calligrapher and head of a high-ranking aristocratic family. Nobutada's contributions to the art and culture, have frequently been overlooked, largely because of the common misperception that aristocrats were too outdated, impoverished and powerless to be worthy of discussion. Dismissed as Elegant Fossils seeks to reinstate aristocrats as key players in the competition for political and artistic supremacy by examining Nobutada's calligraphy and painting, his turbulent relationship with Tokugawa Ieyasu, and his family's role in marital politics.


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The Ear Catches the Eye

Music in Japanese Prints

Magda Kyrova

The ear catches the eye presents a clear picture of the diversity of Japanese instruments and their use in the Kabuki and Nō theatres, during various festivals and within the celebrated Yoshiwara pleasure quarter. The 150 featured prints depicting musical instruments have been described at length, the photographs of the actual instruments are accompanied by thorough explanations of their shape and use. This catalogue accompanied an exhibition held at the Gemeentemuseum, Den Haag.
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Erotic Japonisme

The Influence of Japanese Sexual Imagery on Western Art

Ricard Bru

At its height in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Japonisme had a tremendous impact on Western art. In this publication, author Ricard Bru approaches the cultural phenomenon of Japonisme from an innovative standpoint. He presents an in-depth discussion of the influence of Japanese printed erotic imagery by ukiyo-e masters such as Kitagawa Utamaro, Katsushika Hokusai, and Utagawa Hiroshige on European artists, including Edgar Degas, Auguste Rodin, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Gustav Klimt and Pablo Picasso, as well as writers, critics, and collectors, such as Edmond de Goncourt, Joris-Karl Huysmans, and Émile Zola. With over 160 color illustrations sourced from public and private collections, Erotic Japonisme demonstrates the rich artistic dialogue that existed between Europe and Japan.
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The Female Image

20th Century Japanese Prints of Japanese Beauties.

Shinji Hamanaka and Amy Reigle Newland

The female image is a comprehensive survey of the genre of bijinga ('prints of beautiful women') produced in the Shin hanga tradition that evolved in the early 20th century. This bilingual (Japanese/English) publication is lavishly illustrated with works from Japanese, European and American public and private collections. Prints by major artists such as Hashiguchi Goyō (1880-1921), Torii Kotondo (1900-76) and Itō Shinsui (1898-1972) are included, as are examples from more obscure print designers which have rarely been reproduced.
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Fine & Curious

Japanese Export Porcelain in Dutch Collections

C.J.A. Jörg

An enduring witness to Dutch-Japanese relations is Arita export porcelain made for the Dutch market in the 17th and 18th centuries. The Dutch East India Company (VOC) was instrumental in ordering and distributing a variety of export wares. Private trade also played an important role. This resulted in the importation of large amounts of Japanese porcelain into The Netherlands, particularly during a period when Chinese porcelain was not available. These objects were assimilated into Dutch life and they stimulated the interest in exotica from the Orient. While many of these exquisite pieces have been lost over time, numerous examples are still preserved in public and private collections in The Netherlands. Professor Dr Jörg discusses the variety of export ware and the extraordinary pieces in those collections, many of which are published here for the first time. This survey offers a fascinating insight into a relatively unknown aspect of Dutch-Japanese interaction and is the first book of its kind devoted to this subject in English.
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Andreas Marks

Genji's world in Japanese Woodblock Prints provides the first comprehensive overview of Genji prints, an exceptional subject and publishing phenomenon among Japanese woodblock prints that gives insight into nineteenth-century Japan and its art practices.
In the late 1820s, when the writer Ryūtei Tanehiko (1783–1842), the print designer and book illustrator Utagawa Kunisada (1786–1865) and the publisher Tsuruya Kiemon sat down together in Edo to plot the inaugural chapter of the serial novel A Rustic Genji by a Fraudulent Murasaki (Nise Murasaki inaka Genji), it is doubtful that any one of them envisioned that their actions would generate a new genre in Japanese woodblock prints that would flourish until the turn of the century, Genjie (“Genji pictures”). During these sixty years, over 1,300 original designs were created, of which many were very popular at their time of release.
The story of A Rustic Genji, set in fifteenth-century Japan, is in many respects drawn from Murasaki Shikibu’s (c.973–1014/25) classic novel The Tale of Genji from the early eleventh century.
As the foremost collection of prints of this subject, the extensive holdings of Paulette and Jack Lantz provided the majority of images necessary for this publication.