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This book focuses on trend-setting judgements in different parts of the world that impacted on the rights of individuals belonging to minorities and indigenous people. The cases illustrate how the judiciary has been called upon to fill out the detail of minority protection arrangements and how, in doing so, in many instances the judiciary has taken the respective countries on a course that parliament may not have been able to navigate. In this book authors from various nationalities and backgrounds in the practical application of minority protection arrangements investigate the role of the judiciary in constitutional arrangements aimed at the protection of the rights of minorities and indigenous peoples.
Why do churches assist people without authorized residence even when the state prohibits and punishes such conduct? What does it mean for church-state relations when the church steps into the shoes (or perhaps on the feet) of the government? And are all levels of government on the same page when it comes to migration? These are just some of the questions that this book addresses.
In a world in which migration is an omnipresent reality, these issues pervade national borders, ethnic divides, and physical barriers. These issues are shared among all nations and peoples of this world, and deserve utmost attention as geopolitical contours continue to evolve.
Sustainable Energy Democracy and the Law explores the concept of sustainable energy democracy from a legal perspective. It explains what sustainable energy democracy means and how law can help in moulding the concept. Through discussion of legal approaches and instruments from various jurisdictions around the globe, the book provides valuable insights into how law can either facilitate or restrict sustainable energy democracy in practice. It assesses how potential frictions and synergies between legal instruments could influence sustainable energy democracy.
An International Human Rights Analysis
This book investigates the dynamics between international incitement prohibitions and international standards on freedom of religious speech, with a special focus on the potential incitement prohibitions for the protection of the rights of LGBT+ people. To that end, the book seeks to determine if and to what extent sexual orientation and gender identity are protected grounds under international anti-incitement law. Building on that analysis, the book also delves deeper into the particularly controversial and complex issue of religiously-motivated speech against LGBT+ people, a phenomenon engaging both religious speech rights and equality and other rights of LGBT+ people. Drawing on recent international law benchmarking in the area of incitement and complementing this with extensive comparative legal analysis, best practice lessons are presented on how to calibrate free religious expression and the protection of LGBT rights in the pluralist state. Among other findings, the present research rejects a sweeping a priori trump in the form of a ‘scripture defence’ against incitement charges, but rather recommends a context-based risk assessment of speech acts potentially affecting the rights of LGBT+ people.
Challenged Justice: In Pursuit of Judicial Independence is an academic continuation of the previous volumes on judicial Independence edited by Shimon Shetreet, with others: Jules Deschenes, Christopher Forsyth, and Wayne McCormack. All books were published by Brill Nijhoff: Judicial Independence: The Contemporary Debate (1985), The Culture of Judicial Independence: Conceptual Foundations and Practical Challenges (2012), The Culture of Judicial Independence: Rule of Law and World Peace (2014) and The Culture of Judicial Independence in a Globalised World (2016).
This book offers academic articles by distinguished jurists on judicial independence and judicial process in many jurisdictions including indicators of justice and analysis of international Standards on judicial independence and judicial ethics.
This book examines different approaches by which states characterised by federal or decentralized arrangements reconcile equality and autonomy. In case studies from four continents, leading experts analyse the challenges of ensuring institutional, social and economic equality whilst respecting the competences of regions and the rights of groups.
Author: Maria Cahill

Abstract

Recent technological advances have made clear that law needs to take a stance in relation to freedom of thought. Although there is no formal recognition of freedom of thought in the text of the 1937 Constitution of Ireland, I will argue that such a right does exist in Irish law on the basis of both implicit and initial explicit recognition for freedom of thought in the decisions of the superior courts. Part 2 lays out the ways in which freedom of thought is implicitly recognised in the Irish legal system, both through the protection of other constitutional rights and through the place of international law in the Irish legal order. Part 3 takes the analysis a step further, using the doctrine of unenumerated rights (a peculiarity of Irish constitutional law) to spotlight an overlooked Supreme Court judgment in which the right to freedom of thought has been judicially recognised in the absence of a textual mandate in the Constitution. It then proceeds to shore up arguments in favour of such recognition, arguing that protecting freedom of thought is a good thing, because it honours human freedom and human dignity.

In: European Journal of Comparative Law and Governance

Abstract

This paper examines the right to freedom of thought in the European Convention on Human Rights against the background of technological developments in neuroscience and algorithmic processes. Article 9 echr provides an absolute right to freedom of thought when the integrity of our inner life or forum internum is at stake. In all other cases, where thoughts have been manifested in some way in the forum externum, the right to freedom of thought is treated as a qualified right. While Article 9 echr is a core focus of this paper, we argue that freedom of thought is further supported by Articles 8, 10 and 11 echr. This complex of rights carves out breathing space for the individual’s personal development and therefore supports the enjoyment of freedom of thought in its fullest sense. Charged with ‘maintaining and promoting the ideals and values of a democratic society’ as well as ensuring that individual human rights are given ‘practical and effective protection’, this paper predicts that the ECtHR will make greater use of the right to freedom of thought in the face of the emerging challenges of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

In: European Journal of Comparative Law and Governance

Abstract

This paper focuses on management of Islam by the French State since the state of emergency declared in 2015. We analyze the legal actions of the State using a law-in-context approach and theorize secularism as the State’s management of religion. We focus on the Senate Report (2016) concerning Muslim worship, the legal changes wrought by the state of emergency, and the institutions formed to govern Islam and secularism. We examine whether there has been a change in the French State’s approach to Muslim worship. Rather than remaining neutral, the French State has become even more actively involved in the field of religion by adopting a reformist attitude intended to transform not the principles of laïcité but the Muslims in France. In this period, the State has taken concrete steps and built institutions both to support the formation of a secularized French Islam and to govern the boundaries of laïcité.

In: Journal of Law, Religion and State
Authors: Ka Wai Mak and Ebbe Rogge

Abstract

This paper studies (i) the effects of external directors and managerial ownership, and (ii) the effects of shareholder monitoring, on risk-taking at banks. The former is part of the internal control mechanisms, the latter of external control. It also examines the difference between control mechanisms in the UK and in Japan. It shows that shareholder supremacy is likely to weaken corporate governance at banks. In particular, it finds that: (i) the substituted effects between internal and external controls differ between countries, or that the substituted effects of governance mechanisms may not exist; (ii) an internal corporate governance approach to shareholder supremacy increases risk-taking at banks; and (iii) foreign shareholders are likely to increase risk-taking at banks.

In: European Journal of Comparative Law and Governance