In The Shipmaster's Duty to Render Assistance at Sea under Internationl Law, Felicity G. Attard examines the web of applicable international rules regulating one of the most fundamental obligations at sea. The study explores the shipmaster's duty to render assistance at sea under treaty law, customary international law, and other international instruments. It focuses on an assessment of the duty in light of contemporary challenges posed by the phenomenon of irregular migration by sea, a problem which has intensified in recent years. Whilst Article 98 of the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea provides the basis for the regime regulating the duty, the study addresses other relevant rules adopted by the International Maritime Organization and the International Labour Organization. Due to the humanitarian ramifications of the rendering of assistance at sea, the book considers further obligations imposed under human rights law and refugee law. The study presents a comprehensive analysis of shipmaster's responsibilities in rescue operations, and their role in the fulfilment of States' international obligations in the rendering of assistance.
Editor: Ineta Ziemele
Celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Baltic Yearbook of International Law, this volume contains a selection of articles chosen by the editors to showcase the Yearbook’s important contribution to international legal scholarship and practice. It thus offers ground-breaking articles on diverse legal areas, including international humanitarian law, international human rights law, peaceful settlement of disputes, European Union law, and the history of international law. Naturally, issues relevant to the international legal status of the Baltic States and the consequences of their occupation by the Soviet Union are also explored, as well as to transitional justice and the collapse of communism. Finally, articles on new areas, such as bioethics and cyperspace, are also included, showing where the development of science prompts the need for legal regulation. This wide-ranging selection reflects the Yearbook’s aim to offer a unique forum among international legal periodicals - where the past meets the future.
The originality of this volume lies in the interdisciplinary synergies that emerge through the issues it explores and the approaches it adopts. It offers legal and ethical reflections on the criminal qualification of a series of conducts ranging from human experimentation and non-consensual medical interventions to organ transplant trafficking and marketing of human body parts. It also considers procedural matters, notably related to psychiatric and medical evidence. In so doing, it combines legal and other types of conceptualizations to examine such contemporary issues as rights of the LGBTIQ population, access to medical care, corporate criminal liability, rights of children and Islamic jurisprudence.
Dispute Resolution in the Law of International Watercourses and the Law of the Sea
Editor-in-Chief: Wei Zhang
Editors: Ruoyu LI, Chong Zhang and Hui Shi
This volume presents the concept of a Human Community with a Shared Future as a new path towards the realization of human rights. This idea tries to encourage all countries and economies to focus on a shared future and common destiny for all humankind as well as to work together to build a Human Community with a Shared Future through interdependence and joint development.
The present volume consists of a collection of texts arising from conferences organized by the China Society for Human Rights Studies. The texts centre on the concept of a Human Community with a Shared Future, reflecting the current reality and extent of human rights thinking with respect to both law and policy in establishment circles in China, and helping to demonstrate the likely direction of official policy in the near future.
Rights to their traditional lands and resources are essential to the survival of indigenous peoples. They have been formulated and advanced in the most progressive way by the Inter-American system of human rights protection.

In this book, Mariana Monteiro de Matos analyzes, in detailed and comprehensive inquiry, the pertinent jurisprudence of the Inter-American Commission and Court of Human Rights. She identifies three distinct waves of decision regarding the objects of ownership or possession, the rights associated, and the holders of the rights. Originally, the book also offers a profound analysis of corollary procedural law.
As a discipline, International Criminal Law seems to be fully emancipated from public international law, international humanitarian law and international human rights law. Yet it does not operate in a vacuum. At the international level, the practice at the different international criminal tribunals and courts constitutes clear evidence of the synergies between these legal spheres. At the national level, International Criminal Law is increasingly becoming an integral part of the legal culture, thus interacting with substantive and procedural domestic norms. In addition, whether at the international or the national level, the practice also highlights the societal import and impact of international criminal law and justice. Anthropological, criminological, sociological, ethical and historical research on international criminal law and justice is thus key to fully grasp the discipline, in both its theoretical and practical dimensions. These blurred frontiers make it necessary to provide for a cross-disciplinary and interdisciplinary academic forum to enable discussions on the interactions between international criminal law and justice and distinct legal domains, other disciplines, transitional justice mechanisms, and domestic systems. Studies in International Criminal Law follows the path drawn by the International Criminal Law Review and aims at publishing in-depth analytical research that deals with these issues in a format that will allow for both single-authored monographs and edited volumes.