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Taking Supranational Citizenship Seriously
This collective volume examines how EU citizenship reconstructs in unexpected ways what citizenship as a status means and stands for. EU citizenship can neither be accurately described as a citizenship status similar to national citizenship, nor as an immigration one. The book examines the tension at the heart of attempts to grasp the nature of EU citizenship as supranational status in relation to family reunification, social rights and expulsion. It shows that while events such as Brexit stress the importance of EU citizenship, the construction of supranational citizenship along the axis of non-discrimination and equality remains a work in progress that requires the efforts of all actors involved - institutions, implementing authorities, courts and citizens.
Arctic Lessons Learnt for the Regulation and Management of Tourism in the Antarctic
Antarctica’s wilderness values, even though specifically recognized by the Environmental Protocol to the Antarctic Treaty, are rarely considered in practice. This deficiency is especially apparent with regard to a more and more increasing human footprint caused, among others, by a growing number of tourists visiting the region and conducting a broad variety of activities.
On the basis of a detailed study of three Arctic wilderness areas – the Hammastunturi Wilderness Reserve (Finland), the Archipelago of Svalbard (Norway) and the Denali National Park and Preserve (Alaska, United States) – as well as the relevant policies and legislation in these countries, Antje Neumann identifies numerous ‘lessons learnt’ that can serve as suggestions for improving the protection of wilderness in Antarctica.
In the book Chinese Policy and Presence in the Arctic, Koivurova and Kopra (editors) offer a comprehensive account of China’s evolving interests, policies and strategies in the Arctic region. Despite its lack of geography north of the Arctic Circle, China’s presence in the High North is expected to grow in the coming years, which, in turn, is likely to speed up globalization in the region. This book brings together experts on China and the Arctic, each chapter contributing to a detailed overview of China’s diplomatic, economic, environmental, scientific and strategic presence in the Arctic and its influence on regional affairs. The book is of interest to students, scholars and those dealing with China’s foreign policy and Arctic affairs.

Abstract

Scientific presence and capacities are the foundation of China’s polar engagement and according to China’s White Paper on the Arctic, exploring and understanding the Arctic “serves as the priority and focus for China in its Arctic activities” (prc State Council, 2018). With that and China’s rise in terms of its global and polar science position in mind, the aim of this chapter is to cast light on the history, development and current state of China’s research engagement in the Arctic.

In: Chinese Policy and Presence in the Arctic

Abstract

This chapter offers an account of China’s ecological footprint in the Arctic. Because China is the world’s biggest carbon dioxide emitter and a significant contributor of short-lived climate pollutants, the chapter pays special attention to China’s role in international efforts to tackle climate change. In addition to China’s domestic climate policies, the chapter elaborates the state’s contribution to international climate negotiations under the United Nations climate regime. It also introduces the ways in which China’s Arctic policy addresses climate change and reviews China’s potential to reduce black carbon and other pollutants.

In: Chinese Policy and Presence in the Arctic

Abstract

This chapter elaborates on China’s evolving strategy in the Arctic. For China, the Arctic is no longer about simply being an observer in the Arctic Council, but much more. The chapter will analyze mainly the specifics of China’s Arctic white paper and examine a pair of specific cases, namely China’s role in negotiating the Polar Code and the Arctic fisheries agreement. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which China’s national policy towards the Arctic has emerged and how it has been viewed by other actors and commentators following China’s role in the Arctic. As a sub-section, China’s policy towards the Arctic’s indigenous peoples will also be studied.

In: Chinese Policy and Presence in the Arctic

Abstract

The chapter focuses on economic presence of China in the Arctic regions. First, it considers the economic relations between China and the Nordic states, North American Arctic and Russia. China and Chinese actors are active in different ways in different parts of the Arctic. Second, it looks at the key Arctic industries, where China’s role is or may become relevant: shipping, oil and gas, minerals extraction, and tourism. Finally, the chapter considers the two dimensions of concerns related to Chinese economic activities: the problem of economic and political influence gained through investments and the environment and social performance as well as reliability of Chinese companies.

In: Chinese Policy and Presence in the Arctic

Abstract

As China’s cross-regional diplomacy is not separated from the party-state’s overall foreign policy goals and doctrines, this chapter offers a review of China’s foreign policy and economic interests. Without doubt, these dynamics also shape China’s policy in the Arctic. The chapter concludes that Beijing is no longer content to be a norm-taker in international politics but it is more comfortable with becoming a norm-maker. However, there are noteworthy differences between China’s Arctic engagement and its diplomacy in other parts of the world.

In: Chinese Policy and Presence in the Arctic

Abstract

The chapter focuses on economic relations between China and Finland in the Arctic context. This is done from two perspectives. First, the chapter considers Chinese investments and presence in northern Finland and particularly Lapland. Relevant sectors include bioeconomy and tourism, the Arctic railway project, as well as – in terms of future prospects – mining, renewable energy, data centres and testing facilities. Second, the chapter looks at the instances of economic cooperation – Finnish investments in China, Chinese in Finland and joint ventures – in areas of Finnish Arctic expertise.

In: Chinese Policy and Presence in the Arctic

Abstract

This chapter summarises the key findings of the book. In particular, it reviews China’s Arctic actorness and the party-state’s contribution to Arctic affairs. It also briefly ponders risks and future prospects of China’s role in the Arctic – a role that the chapter expects to grow in the coming years.

In: Chinese Policy and Presence in the Arctic