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Ebenezer Durojaye and Mariam Wallet Med Aboubakrine

This article examines non-communicable diseases (NCDs) as a challenge among indigenous population in Africa. From a rights-based perspective, the article considers some of the social determinants of health and other challenges that can aggravate NCDs among indigenous groups in Africa. It further examines the recognition of the right to health of indigenous populations under international law. This is followed by a discussion on some of the barriers to addressing NCDs among indigenous peoples in the region. It concludes by urging African governments to be more proactive in adopting measures grounded in human rights standards to address the rising incidence of NCDs among indigenous peoples in the region.

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Edited by Jeremy Gunn, Jeroen Temperman and Malcolm D. Evans

As the tensions involving religion and society increase, the European Court of Human Rights and the Freedom of Religion or Belief is the first systematic analysis of the first twenty-five years of European Court's religion jurisprudence. The Court is one of the most significant institutions confronting the interactions among states, religious groups, minorities, and dissenters. In the 25 years since its first religion case, Kokkinakis v. Greece, the Court has inserted itself squarely into the international human rights debate regarding the freedom of religion or belief. The authors demonstrate the positive contributions and the significant flaws of the Court's jurisprudence involving religion, society, and secularism.
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Tamsin Phillipa Paige

Aside from self-defence, a UN Security Council authorisation under /chapter VII is the only exception to the prohibition on the use of force. Authorisation of the use of force requires the Security Council to first determine whether that situation constitutes a ‘threat to the peace’ under Article 39. The Charter has long been interpreted as placing few bounds around how the Security Council arrives at such determinations. As such commentators have argued that the phrase ‘threat to the peace’ is undefinable in nature and lacking in consistency. Through a critical discourse analysis of the justificatory discourse of the P5 surrounding individual decisions relating to ‘threat to the peace’ (found in the meeting transcripts), this book demonstrates that each P5 member has a consistent definition and understanding of what constitutes a ‘threat to the peace’.
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Judiciary as Constituted Power

European Court History from Medieval Canon Law to ECHR

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Ulrike Juliane Maria Müßig

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Intergenerational Equity

Environmental and Cultural Concerns

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Edited by Thomas Cottier, Shaheeza Lalani and Clarence Siziba

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The Future of EU Criminal Justice Policy and Practice

Legal and Criminological Perspectives

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Edited by Jannemieke Ouwerkerk, Jacob Öberg, Judit Altena, Samuli Miettinen and Annika Suominen

EU criminal justice is a fast developing and challenging area of EU law and policy that requires scholars from different disciplines to join forces. This book is a first attempt to establish such synergies. Coming from different angles, the authors deal with questions in the area of EU substantive criminal law, such as when criminalisation of conduct is an appropriate choice; how the process of (de)criminalisation could be advanced; what the role of evidence could be in this regard; and what consequences criminalisation decisions at EU level have for national legal orders. The book concludes with a demonstration of how similar issues arise in the field of procedural criminal law.
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Scope and Aims Launched in 2018, the European Criminal Justice Series provides a forum for high-quality scholarship on the European dimensions of crime, criminal law, criminal policy, and punishment. Publications in the series provide insight into how crime, criminal law and criminal justice is developing within the European Union and on the European continent, both from a legal and criminological perspectives. The series particularly welcomes monographs but is also open to edited volumes.

Information for Authors
Authors who are interested to publish in the European Criminal Justice Series, are invited to submit a proposal for consideration by the editorial board. For questions regarding the European Criminal Justice Series, or to submit a proposal, please contact the Editorial Board. The Editorial Board consists of the board members of the European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, and two additional members. Each manuscript will be reviewed by the two editors-in-chief and by either one or two board members – depending on the topic and the required expertise.
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Francisco Pascual-Vives

In Consensus-Based Interpretation of Regional Human Rights Treaties Francisco Pascual-Vives examines the central role played by the notion of consensus in the case law of the European and Inter-American Courts of Human Rights. As many other international courts and tribunals do, both regional human rights courts resort to this concept while undertaking an evolutive interpretation of the Rome Convention and the Pact of San José, respectively. The role exerted by the notion of consensus in this framework can be used not only to understand the evolving character of the rights and freedoms recognized by these international treaties, but also to reaffirm the international nature of these regional human rights courts.
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Edited by Barry Steiner

The essays in this book, originally published in a special issue of the journal International Negotiation (vol. 23.1, 2018), are intended to enhance America's ability to mediate Israel-Palestine conflict. Every American president for the last thirty years, down to Donald Trump, has chosen to engage in this effort. To help understand and evaluate these efforts, and to focus upon the more promising mediation directions, these essays analyze mediation options in detail.
I. William Zartman accentuates special challenges of third party mediation. Amira Schiff critiques John Kerry’s mediation effort made on behalf of the Obama Administration. Galia Golan outlines mediation requirements in light of past American mediation efforts. Walid Salem suggests a new paradigm centered upon symmetry rather than asymmetry to assist Israel-Palestine peacemaking. And Barry Steiner studies a specific mediation action proposal.
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Christian H. Kälin

In Ius Doni in International Law and EU Law, Dr. Christian H. Kälin establishes the concept of ius doni in the contemporary legal and political theorising of citizenship. Providing a comprehensive analysis of the subject, it discusses the legal and political concepts of citizenship. It also introduces a new term for what is already an increasingly common and accepted practice of granting citizenship on the basis of substantial contributions to the State. Consisting of two main parts – law and practice – the monograph analyses the ius doni concept in both international law and EU law, further tests its application in practice and establishes best practices among states. Finally, the book discusses the conceptual and practical implications for citizenship.