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Practical and Theoretical Challenges to 21st Century Federalism
Beyond Autonomy forces us to rethink the meaning of autonomy as a central organising pillar of federalism. Can federations exist beyond the autonomy realm designed to promote territorial self-governance and direct representation among various levels of government? How do governments of federal systems interact over the design and implementation of policy in highly topical areas such as security, where the optimal distribution of authority is blurred? Which mechanisms promote the compromise necessary in many of today’s democratic federal systems? How do newly emerging federations in Africa and Asia design federal institutions in order to decrease conflict while promoting national solidarity? How can federal systems protect the rights of non-territorial minorities such as many indigenous peoples?
This series critically examines issues of legal doctrine and practice in Central and Eastern Europe, including studies on the harmonization of legal principles and rules; the legal impact of the intertwining of domestic economies, on the one hand, with regional economies and the processes of international trade and investment on the other. The series offers a forum for discussion of topical questions of public and private law from domestic, regional, and international perspectives. Comparative research that provides insights in legal developments that can be communicated to those interested in questions, not only of law, but also of politics, economics, and of society of countries in the region also finds a home in the series.

For information about a related title, visit the webpages of the Brill journal Review of Central and East European Law.
Sino-European Dialogue between Judges and Academics
Volume Editors: Ragna Aarli and Anne Sanders
The challenges courts face today all over the world can only be solved in close cooperation between judges and academics which crosses national borders. The anthology brings judges and academics together for a dialogue on judicial reforms. The book presents contributions by the judges on their judicial systems (China, Germany, Slovenia, England and Wales and Norway). The contributions by the academics take up different themes which have emerged in the country reports: The topics include comparative, normative and organisational perspectives on national court systems as well as international perspectives on courts as guarantors of individual rights in an increasingly globalised rule-of-law framework.
Author: Julia Schmidt
In The European Union and the Use of Force, Julia Schmidt examines the development and activities of the EU as an emerging international military actor. The author offers a comprehensive analysis of the conditions under which the EU can engage in military crisis management operations from the perspective of EU law as well as from the perspective of public international law, with a particular emphasis on the EU’s relationship with the United Nations and the EU’s relationship with its Member States in the context of the use of force.
Throughout the monograph, questions of European integration in the sphere of the common security and defence policy as well as the EU’s place and role within the international community are put into focus.
Author: Odile Ammann
Special missions play an increasing and crucial role in international diplomacy and yet the international law governing them remains to some extent uncertain. This book is based on the responses of States to the questionnaire of the Council of Europe Committee of Legal Advisers on Public International Law (CAHDI) on ‘Immunities of special missions’, considered against the background of the 1969 United Nations Convention on Special Missions, key judicial decisions and national legislation on special mission immunity, government statements, and other state practice and evidence of opinio juris. The book presents and analyses the international law and practice governing special missions, while identifying remaining areas of uncertainty.

This volume contains an up-to-date analysis of the law and practice of special missions, based on information from a wide range of States. It aims to provide a practical guide on this issue for governments, judges, practitioners, academics and students alike.

Immunités des missions spéciales
Les missions spéciales jouent un rôle croissant et crucial sur la scène diplomatique internationale et pourtant, le droit international qui les régit reste dans une certaine mesure incertain. Ce livre s’appuie sur les réponses des Etats au questionnaire du Comité des conseillers juridiques sur le droit international public (CAHDI) du Conseil de l'Europe sur les « immunités des missions spéciales », à la lumière de la Convention des Nations Unies sur les missions spéciales de 1969, de la législation nationale et de la jurisprudence sur l'immunité des missions spéciales, des déclarations gouvernementales et d'autres pratiques étatiques et la preuve de l' opinio juris. L’ouvrage présente et analyse le droit international et la pratique régissant les missions spéciales, tout en identifiant les domaines où des incertitudes subsistent.

Ce volume contient une analyse à jour de la législation et de la pratique relatives aux missions spéciales, basée sur des informations provenant de nombreux Etats. Il vise à fournir un guide pratique sur cette question pour les gouvernements, les juges, les praticiens, les universitaires et les étudiants.
In this monograph, Aistė Mickonytė examines the compliance of the European anti-cartel enforcement procedure with the presumption of innocence under Article 6(2) of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). The author maintains that the pursuit of manifestly severe punishment with insistence of the European Commission on administrative-level procedural safeguards is inconsistent with the robust standards of protection under the Convention. Arguing that EU anti-cartel procedure is criminal within the meaning of the Convention, this work considers this procedure in light of the core elements of the presumption of innocence such as the burden of proof and the principle of fault. The author zeroes in on the de facto automatic liability of parental companies for offences committed by their subsidiaries.
Author: Kate Shaw
In the Court of Justice of the European Union, Subsidiarity and Proportionality Kate Shaw sets out how a subsidiarity and proportionality review applied to competences could be anchored by the Court of Justice when balancing the competing interests in cases concerning the residency rights of EU citizens. The book also considers the extent to which a court which is dedicated to enhancing the European project is really able to be an independent arbiter between the EU and the Member States in this context. Both the legal reasoning of the Court and the controversial nature of residency rights of EU citizens are legally and politically very topical at the moment and of interest to legal academics and law students.
Traditionally viewed as a positive phenomenon, student mobility has recently come under critical scrutiny as a result of the financial crisis pushing European solidarity to its breaking point, and the fear of excessive EU incursion into the autonomy of Member States with respect to their higher education systems.
In Balancing Student Mobility Rights and National Higher Education Autonomy in the European Union, Alexander Hoogenboom contributes to the ongoing and evolving debate from a legal perspective. The book offers recommendations with a view to reconcile the mobility rights of Union citizens for study purposes and the need to respect Member State autonomy in the organisation of their higher education systems. The argument made suggests rethinking established principles in EU free movement law while encouraging greater EU involvement in student funding opportunities.

EU and WTO Service Trade Liberalization and Their Impact on Dutch and UK Immigration Rules
Author: Simon J. Tans
This book investigates how liberalization of service provision related to movement of natural persons takes shape within EU and WTO law. It provides an overview and analysis of the implementation of the identified obligations derived from EU law and the GATS in the Dutch legal order and that of the United Kingdom. A thorough investigation of the chosen strategies in each legal order is provided, including a comparison of the differences and similarities between these strategies. The resulting overview leads to insight into the tension that exists between the international obligations related to service mobility of the two investigated states on the one hand, and their migration law and access to the labour market legislation on the other.